Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk
Reload this Page >

Scentists crash satellite into comet (on purpose)

Other Talk "Otterville"

Scentists crash satellite into comet (on purpose)

Old 07-04-05, 05:05 AM
  #1  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
Scentists crash satellite into comet (on purpose)

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...c/comet_buster

PASADENA, Calif. - A space probe hit its comet target late Sunday in a NASA-directed, Hollywood-style mission that scientists hope will reveal clues to how the solar system formed. It marked the first time a spacecraft touched the surface of a comet, igniting a dazzling Independence Day weekend fireworks display in space.

ADVERTISEMENT (Deep Impact on DVD for only $9.94!)

The successful strike 83 million miles away from Earth occurred just before 11 p.m. PDT, according to mission control at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, which is managing the $333 million mission.

Scientists at mission control erupted in applause and gave each other hugs as news of the impact spread.

It was a milestone for the U.S. space agency, which hopes the experiment will answer basic questions about the origins of the solar system.

The cosmic smash-up did not significantly alter the comet's orbit around the sun and NASA said the experiment does not pose any danger to Earth.

An image by the mothership showed a bright spot in the lower section of the comet where the collision occurred that hurled a cloud of debris into space. When the dust settles, scientists hope to peek inside the comet's frozen core a composite of ice and rock left over from the early solar system.

"We hit it just exactly where we wanted to," co-investigator Don Yeomans said.

More than 10,000 people packed Hawaii's Waikiki Beach to see the impact on a giant movie screen.

"It's almost like one of those science fiction movies," said Steve Lin, a Honolulu physician as his 7-year old son, Robi, zipped around his beach blanket.

Scientists had compared the suicide journey to standing in the middle of the road and being hit by a semi-truck roaring at 23,000 mph. They expect the crater will be anywhere from the size of a large house to a football stadium and between two and 14 stories deep.

A day earlier, the Deep Impact spacecraft successfully released its barrel-sized "impactor" probe on a high-speed collision course with Tempel 1 a pickle-shaped comet half the size of Manhattan.

After its release, the battery-powered probe tumbled in free flight toward the comet and flew on its own without human help during the critical two hours before the crash, firing its thrusters to get the perfect aim of the comet nucleus.

A direct hit was a challenge because NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory no longer controlled the probe once it was released from the spacecraft. Even so, the odds favored success based on previous testing.

Along the way, as the comet closed in, the copper probe took close-up pictures of the icy celestial body at a rapid clip until its destruction. The carefully orchestrated crash gave off energy equivalent to exploding nearly 5 tons of dynamite.

The mothership had a front-row seat to the comet strike 5,000 miles away. NASA's fleet of space telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory and Spitzer Space Telescope, and dozens of ground observatories also viewed the impact.

Soon after the probe's crash on the comet's sunlit side, the mothership prepared to approach Tempel 1 to peer into the crater site and send more data back to Earth. The spacecraft planned to fly within 310 miles of the comet before it activates its dust shields to protect itself from a blizzard of debris.

Comets are frozen balls of dirty ice, rock and dust that orbit the sun. A giant cloud of gas and dust collapsed to create the sun and planets about 4.5 billion years ago and comets formed from the leftover building blocks of the solar system.

As comets circle the sun, their surfaces heat up and change so that only their frozen interiors possess original space material. Scientists hope to analyze images of these primordial ingredients jarred loose by the impact to give new insight into how the sun and planets formed.

Deep Impact launched Jan. 12 from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on a six-month, 268 million-mile voyage toward Tempel 1. In what scientists say is a coincidence, the spacecraft shares the same name as the 1998 movie about a comet hurtling toward Earth.

No other space mission has flown this close to a comet. In 2004, NASA's Stardust craft flew within 147 miles of Comet Wild 2 en route back to Earth carrying interstellar dust samples.

The 1,300-pound spacecraft snapped its first photo of Tempel 1 from 40 million miles away in April, revealing what amounts to a dirty snowball. Last month, still 20 million miles away, scientists saw the comet's solid core for the first time.

----

I am most confident this satellite crash will surely explain the existence of our universe and how it was formed.
Old 07-04-05, 07:30 AM
  #2  
DVD Talk Legend
 
raven56706's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Back in the Good Ole USA
Posts: 21,767
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
NASA said if this doesnt work... they will send a bunch of OIL Drill Experts to take care of that comet.
Old 07-04-05, 07:31 AM
  #3  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Lateralus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Valley of Megiddo
Posts: 9,570
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
I hope they have video for this, that would be neat to watch.
Old 07-04-05, 09:29 AM
  #4  
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 239
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is just a story to cover up the fact that someone at NASA was driving the satellite while drunk.
Old 07-04-05, 10:36 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hero
 
TomOpus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 37,648
Received 783 Likes on 571 Posts
Let's see.... they're calling this "Deep Impact" and they hope to discover how the solar system formed. Suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuure.

There's something they're not telling us....







WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!!
Old 07-04-05, 10:59 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,438
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Why do the pics so far suck so bad? I want the good pics and actual video (at least the series of stills spliced together into a movie). And why can't NASA in their infinite wisdom run a better web site? The initial graphics are sweet, then you get to the comet viewer pics and it's garbage, only works half the time, etc.
Old 07-04-05, 11:02 AM
  #7  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,438
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Okay, there are some better pics here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/de...dia/index.html

The image viewer feature is what appears to be the poorest right now, just like it was with the Rovers for a while.


There is a lot of cool stuff to be found though if you take the time. The media has waned in its coverage of the Mars rovers, which are amazingly STILL chugging away. The video of the dust devils is pretty sweet. (seen <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/highlights/index.html">here</a> under Video Features.

It's worth taking some time to look around.
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html

<img src="http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20050610a/sunset_a489_gamma_2sub_800_br.jpg">

Last edited by Th0r S1mpson; 07-04-05 at 11:14 AM.
Old 07-04-05, 11:45 AM
  #8  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 1,852
Received 275 Likes on 143 Posts
Nit: Deep Impact is a probe, not a satellite.
Old 07-04-05, 12:51 PM
  #9  
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 86,190
Received 8 Likes on 5 Posts
More than 10,000 people packed Hawaii's Waikiki Beach to see the impact on a giant movie screen.

I went to a movie there once. You have to be in pretty good shape just to get near the front. Seemed like it was over 100 yards deep.
Old 07-04-05, 06:17 PM
  #10  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MI
Posts: 25,110
Received 12 Likes on 9 Posts
So, let me get this straight. We banged a comet 83 million miles away, going 23,000 mph, but missile defense is a flawed concept and can't possibly work, we'd never be able to hit a moving missile. Have I got that right?
Old 07-04-05, 06:19 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Work. Or commuting. Certainly not at home.
Posts: 17,816
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by OldDude
So, let me get this straight. We banged a comet 83 million miles away, going 23,000 mph, but missile defense is a flawed concept and can't possibly work, we'd never be able to hit a moving missile. Have I got that right?
Not entirely disagreeing with you, but we can calculate the orbit of the comet fairly exactly so we know where it will be at any given time. Having the capacity to do this entirely on the fly with a missile is somewhat different, I'd think.
Old 07-04-05, 06:24 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
Exactly.

When you have 50 years to predict a comet's path, and only a few minutes to predict an incoming missile's path, there are slight differences.

Astro-Scientists have it easy, I tell'ya.
Old 07-04-05, 06:33 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 838
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This endeavor cost $300 million. What a waste of money. Why is it so important to find out how the universe started. Isn't it more important to take care of the planet we are on? We have enough problems here to worry about.
Old 07-04-05, 06:35 PM
  #14  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
That's what I keep wondering about, in addition to finding ancient relatives who are millions of years old. Who gives a neanderthal fuck. Take care of our society now, thanks.
Old 07-04-05, 06:40 PM
  #15  
DVD Talk Legend
 
The Infidel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: the kingdom of the evil Voratians, ruled by the wicked Ak-Oga
Posts: 11,547
Received 52 Likes on 31 Posts
Originally Posted by tboogie
This endeavor cost $300 million. What a waste of money. Why is it so important to find out how the universe started. Isn't it more important to take care of the planet we are on? We have enough problems here to worry about.
That's pretty much what I was just getting ready to say. $330M is a heluva lot of money. Great...we destroyed a spacecraft on the surface of a comet millions of miles away. Now let me tell you how we could have spent that money right here on our home planet to feed and house hungry and homeless people. You guys at NASA remember our home planet, right? It's the one trying to find the money to research cures for diseases and find better sources of energy other than bleeding the land dry of oil.
Old 07-04-05, 06:42 PM
  #16  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
I bet someone is going to tell us to post in the Gaylord Nelson thread.
Old 07-04-05, 07:39 PM
  #17  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,438
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Dude, you people are nuts. If we find out the origins of teh Universe, maybe we can start a new, better, more powerful Universe with chocolate that grows on trees and moons that are really cheese. It's easy to complain about our current conditions, how bad things are, how money could be spent, yadda yadda yadda. But remember the visionairies like Einstein. What would Einstein think about this fantastic experiment? He was the dreamer who developed the theory of relativity. "Relative to the new Universe we will start, this one blows," he would say. Yes, people are suffering and people are hungry. But how hungry would people be if they could live on a cheese moon?
Old 07-05-05, 12:27 AM
  #18  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: The sprawling metropolis of Manassas Park, VA USA
Posts: 3,616
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by The_Infidel
That's pretty much what I was just getting ready to say. $330M is a heluva lot of money. Great...we destroyed a spacecraft on the surface of a comet millions of miles away. Now let me tell you how we could have spent that money right here on our home planet to feed and house hungry and homeless people. You guys at NASA remember our home planet, right? It's the one trying to find the money to research cures for diseases and find better sources of energy other than bleeding the land dry of oil.

*sigh* This is such an old and tired argument.

We spend mountains of money on problems, yet we still have the problems. And we will always have problems. When we go to the Moon and Mars and beyond, we'll take our problems with us. Money alone won't fix them anyway.

Like the War On Poverty has worked out so well.


FWIW, Here's a few ways that space technology spinoffs have enhanced our lives:





Eh, but don't listen to me...listen from someone who's been there and back a few times:

Why have a space program?
Glad you asked ...
By Jim Lovell
June 29, 1999

As long as there has been a space program, there have been detractors. "What are we doing up in space when we've got real problems right here on Earth?"

I welcome that question since it gives me a chance to list the multitude of innovations we use every day that were first developed for space exploration. And that list keeps getting longer and longer.

Just recently, I used a new ear thermometer to check the temperature of a squirming grandchild. The handy device is based on metal coatings technology developed for space helmets.

Smoke detectors, hand-held vacuum cleaners, water filters and ergonomic furniture are just some of the many household items first developed for use in space. The highly efficient foam insulation used in new homes was first used to insulate fuel tanks on liquid-fueled rockets.

Portable X-ray machines, programmable pacemakers and many surgical tools were all pioneered as part of the space program. Concentrated baby foods, as well as the freeze-dried instant mixes we feed our kids, were first consumed in space. Many of the biofeedback techniques used to reduce stress were first developed for use by astronauts.

Satellites have revolutionized telecommunications and the Global Positioning System (GPS) can help navigators on land, in the air or on the seas locate their position to within 10 feet anywhere in the world.

The list goes on and on. Studies have shown that for every dollar spent on space development, $7 have been returned to the economy in the form of a new product or service. But one space-program spin-off is paying dividends greater than anyone ever imagined.

While the economy in many parts of the world is in shambles, the U.S. economy keeps humming along. Americans are earning more money than ever before. Unemployment is near an all-time low. And, amazingly, inflation is virtually nonexistent.

Why is the American economy so strong? Economists, not generally known for brevity, answer with a single word: productivity. Since 1990, productivity increases in the United States have averaged 2.1 percent each year.

Besides our fabled work ethic, what is it that makes American workers so productive? Computers. American workers know how to use computer technology to work better and smarter. And you can thank the space program for those computers.

During the 1950s, computers were the size of a supermarket. To travel into space, however, we needed computers that could fit into a phone booth. Companies like Fairchild and Intel experimented with ways to reduce the size of computers. The result was the microprocessor.

Every one of the tiny computer chips found in personal computers, network servers, airplanes, manufacturing equipment, cars, toaster ovens, washing machines, toys, alarm clocks, and thousands of other products can trace its heritage back to those integrated circuits first developed for the space program.

Thirty-five years ago, critics called the newly invented microprocessors "novelties" and "toys." Today, the cost of developing these "toys" has been returned a billion-fold, if not more.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration accounts for a mere 1 percent of the federal budget an amazingly small amount when you consider the profound effect the agency's work has had on the quality of our lives. Ironically, while the research and development budgets for other government agencies are increasing, NASA's continues to decline this in spite of its extraordinary track record.

We must continue investing in technology and the space program. We should encourage our children to study math and science. If anything, we should invest more in science education. Standard & Poors DRI estimates that if our productivity and innovation continues at its present rate, real wages could rise by 9 percent over the next decade. Corporate earnings could rise as much as 54 percent.

Scientific growth means economic growth. The evidence is irrefutable. Let's not turn our backs on progress. There is still so much to discover new medicines, new materials, new ways to protect the environment.

If I sound like I'm excited, I am. Who knows which new "toys" will revolutionize the way we live.

Last edited by Foole; 07-05-05 at 12:31 AM.
Old 07-05-05, 12:40 AM
  #19  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
Interesting statements.

How about this. Scrap deep space programs such as crashing objects into space and funding programs that are investigating how old the universe is, and just invest that money directly into products that can be used by the consumer.

Like so:

$$$$ ----> product research ----> <strike>ridiculous space missions</strike> ----> consumer products.

You don't need a space program to develop great products.

I can just see it now. The Bush Administration will hire some dumbass to say we need more wars such as Iraq, so that inventions such as the GPS, and laser devices can be made and eventually passed on to the consumer.

Last edited by DVD Polizei; 07-05-05 at 12:46 AM.
Old 07-05-05, 01:07 AM
  #20  
DVD Talk Legend
 
The Infidel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: the kingdom of the evil Voratians, ruled by the wicked Ak-Oga
Posts: 11,547
Received 52 Likes on 31 Posts
Originally Posted by Foole
*sigh* This is such an old and tired argument.

We spend mountains of money on problems, yet we still have the problems. And we will always have problems. When we go to the Moon and Mars and beyond, we'll take our problems with us. Money alone won't fix them anyway.
First of all, I never even implied that the money spent on the space program would fix any of the problems I mentioned. All your little examples of how technological advances have improved things in the medical field and whatnot are admirable. Way to go, scientists. Bringing "space technology" to Earth is fine, but what do we learn by crashing $330M into a big-ass rock? Problem is, all these things designed and created to make things more convenient for everyone are still leaving the bigger problems unsolved; namely, some of the things I mentioned, plus more. Want to go to the moon? Fine. Want to explore Mars? Go for it. Want to crash into a comet? More power to you. But first, what do you say we fix the bigger problems down here, so we don't have to take them with us when we advance outwards.

Old and tired argument? Of course it is...to the people who prefer to push the dirt under the new titanium floor, rather than sweep it up first. You don't get rid of problems by ignoring them.

Jim Lovell?!? Since when did a fucking astronut (no, not a typo) become some quotable sage for our times? With that piece of rhetoric you posted, he's nothing but a goddamn goverment shill, justifying doing nothing but making more money for corporate America, while Average Joe makes slightly more than minimum wage and gives his tax money back to a government that's not going to figure out how to help him and his family...but how to crash a spacecraft into a big...fucking...rock.

Originally Posted by DVD Polizei
I can just see it now. The Bush Administration will hire some dumbass to say we need more wars such as Iraq, so that inventions such as the GPS, and laser devices can be made and eventually passed on to the consumer.
You can keep the GPS and laser devices, Mr. <strike>President</strike> Door-to-Door Salesman. I'll take that cure for cancer you have in the bottom of the box, thank you.

Last edited by The_Infidel; 07-05-05 at 01:23 AM.
Old 07-05-05, 01:48 AM
  #21  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: NYC
Posts: 17,016
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
There will be always be poverty, hunger, and disease. Saying, "Let's put 1% more towards it and it will suddenly get better" is fantasy. Space exploration gives us plenty of knowledge, regardless of new technology.

If nothing else, think about this. One decent-sized asteroid and we are toast. At least if we colonize other planets we won't have all of our eggs in one basket. We are the only species in the history of our planet that has had the power to choose our own fate. The dinosaurs sure as hell didn't fly to Mars 65 million years ago.
Old 07-05-05, 02:54 AM
  #22  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: a mile high, give or take a few feet
Posts: 14,325
Received 112 Likes on 91 Posts
Originally Posted by Breakfast with Girls
The dinosaurs sure as hell didn't fly to Mars 65 million years ago.
Maybe they did, and continued on. Maybe this comet is actually a big frozen pile of dinosaur spaceship waste.

That'd be kind of cool.
Old 07-05-05, 02:58 AM
  #23  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: somewhere in between
Posts: 4,395
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Breakfast with Girls
The dinosaurs sure as hell didn't fly to Mars 65 million years ago.

how can you be so sure?
Old 07-05-05, 03:28 AM
  #24  
DVD Talk Godfather
Thread Starter
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 53,754
Received 152 Likes on 112 Posts
Originally Posted by Breakfast with Girls
There will be always be poverty, hunger, and disease. Saying, "Let's put 1% more towards it and it will suddenly get better" is fantasy. Space exploration gives us plenty of knowledge, regardless of new technology.

If nothing else, think about this. One decent-sized asteroid and we are toast. At least if we colonize other planets we won't have all of our eggs in one basket. We are the only species in the history of our planet that has had the power to choose our own fate. The dinosaurs sure as hell didn't fly to Mars 65 million years ago.
I think it's rather a little presumptive to assume we are the only species to have chosen our own fate. It could very well be there were many species who evolved on this planet and left.

It could very well be we, humans, are the only retarded species who is still around, and can't get its act together, even when we are given the potential intellect for it.

We couldn't stop an asteroid from hitting the earth today, and I seriously doubt we will be able to do it 100 years from now? Why? Because we such a bureaucracy in place, nothing gets done, and promised performance is greatly exaggerated.

Think about it.

When is the last time we even went to the moon or even outside earth's orbit. It's been about 40 years. We are having to re-learn space travel because of this long timespan of absent travel.

And what happens if an asteroid hits earth within the next 10 years? 20 years? 50 years? The facts are, no one can tell us when earth is going to be extinct. And at the current rate of colonization efforts, we're better off paying Sudan witch doctors to call on spirits to keep the big rocks away.

If space exploration was narrowed down to actual colonization and missions to mars, I wouldn't have a problem--but even then it's dragging on at a snail's pace. We have billions of dollars paying scientists to revamp their litttle theories of the universe, which don't have any effect whatsoever on colonization. Just like the SETI program, which is merely a "feel-good" and parallel's society's love affair with Star Trek.

And it's not just space-related funding either. I think we should take a look at anthropology and determine today, in 2005, does it really matter what our ancestors looked like? Does it matter if they were 5 million years old or 10 million?

If we truly want to be an advanced people, we must strip unnecessary resources and divert them towards solving the core issues which will benefit us if we move off this planet.
Old 07-05-05, 04:12 AM
  #25  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Lower Beaver, Iowa
Posts: 10,521
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by The_Infidel
$330M is a heluva lot of money.
Yet it's a fraction of what Halliburton has been paid for its work in Iraq over the last two years.

I'd rather spend the money on furthering our understanding of the solar system and our place in it, thanks.

Originally Posted by DVD Polizei
If we truly want to be an advanced people, we must strip unnecessary resources and divert them towards solving the core issues which will benefit us if we move off this planet.
Truly advanced cultures embrace scientific knowledge, knowing you can never tell where it will lead. And Deep Impact is after exactly the kind of information that will benefit humankind of we ever move beyond Earth.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.