Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk
Reload this Page >

Busted pipe(?) Now what?

Other Talk "Otterville"

Busted pipe(?) Now what?

Old 02-01-05, 12:09 PM
  #1  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,935
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Busted pipe(?) Now what?

I just went outside to spray off some dirt on the side of our home. I had the water on for about 15 minutes. Came back inside and my wife noticed that a 4 foot by 4 foot water puddle was on our hard wood flooring close to the window where the outdoor faucet is. My first thought was that a bunch of water came through a crack in the window, but it's completely dry, as is every inch of wall and ceiling around the puddle. Busted pipe from below it seems.

We have hard wood flooring over slab concrete (no basement). The house is two years old. I guess I wouldn't have thought that a busted pipe could force water up through the slab, but I'm probably wrong here.

Have any of you dealt with this before? I'm scared that this might be a very nasty (expensive) fix. The only good thing I can think of is that the leak seems to be close to the outside of the house. If anyone would need to get to the pipe they'd have to knock trough the concrete (just below where the hardiplank ends). Geez, I don't know. The idea of them having to go through the floor makes me sick if that was necessary. I know that home owner's insurance is really to only be used for catastrophic damage, not something like this.

I can leave the water valve shut off outside and there is no flooding going on with it off. Damn ice storm! I should have gone outside and turned on the water a bit over the weekend (?).

Advice?
Old 02-01-05, 12:25 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MI
Posts: 25,082
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
Originally Posted by atlantamoi
I can leave the water valve shut off outside and there is no flooding going on with it off.
Advice?
I think this statement is key, If the pipe going to the faucet were leaking, there would still be water and water pressure in the pipe when the faucet is off, that is, it would leak all the time.

If it only leaks when the faucet is on, there may be a leak in the faucet itself, or water from your squiting was getting inside the wall and running down the wall somewhere.

You could try repeating what you did before with your wife watching to see where the water is coming from.
Old 02-01-05, 12:32 PM
  #3  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,935
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yeah, we just repeated to see what would happen. There is a clear leak coming from the faucet. I could see water coming out of a crack in the concrete outside the house below the bottom plank. Inside, the water came out from just under the moulding where it meets the hardwood.

Okay, guess it's time to call a repair man. But damn, I think they might have to go through the hardiplank to get to the problem.
Old 02-01-05, 12:50 PM
  #4  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Heat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 16,701
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
If it's just the faucet, just replace the faucet yourself, will be much cheaper than hiring a plumber.

Turn off the water to that pipe, then take off the old faucet and take it to a small plumbing supply store. They will be able to sell you a replacement part as well as give you tips on installing the new one (such as use teflon tape).

So you are on a slab and you don't have a crawl space? I'm not sure how to get to the faucet then, is there an access panel from inside or something like that?
Old 02-01-05, 02:32 PM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Home again, Big D
Posts: 31,840
Received 62 Likes on 52 Posts
This may sound obvious, but clean up the water on your hard woods ASAP. Use towels and do NOT turn up the heat in hopes of drying quicker.
Old 02-01-05, 03:14 PM
  #6  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,935
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Heat
So you are on a slab and you don't have a crawl space? I'm not sure how to get to the faucet then, is there an access panel from inside or something like that?
No crawl space.
Yeah, after my first post where I was kind freaking out over the possibilities it is probably just the faucet. Not sure how I'm going to get to it properly, but I'll figure it out.

thanks
Old 02-01-05, 04:48 PM
  #7  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Back home in Maine!
Posts: 1,611
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Exactly the reason I would never build or buy that a house with that type of foundation. No help to you, sorry, but just thought I'd toss that in.
Old 02-01-05, 05:07 PM
  #8  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Somewhere between Heaven and Hell
Posts: 31,623
Received 200 Likes on 142 Posts
re:Busted pipe(?) Now what?

Old 02-01-05, 05:14 PM
  #9  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Home again, Big D
Posts: 31,840
Received 62 Likes on 52 Posts
Originally Posted by Mongo
Exactly the reason I would never build or buy that a house with that type of foundation. No help to you, sorry, but just thought I'd toss that in.
Pipe breaks in slab foundations are really not that big of a deal. In fact it is far less worse then say a leak in the attic, floor of a 2nd or 3rd story home, etc. True there is some concrete work that may be needed, but in general it is "rough in" work. After all, you end up covering up the concrete finished flooring.

Also is some parts of the country it is the best choice of foundation. For example here in the Dallas area, I'd say close to 90% of homes built in the last 15 years are slabs.

To the OP, if you have wood floor damage and the pipe is in the slab, you might contact your insurance company to see if some coverage is available. Tho you will have to pay your deductible and depending on the policy there may be limited or no coverage, it might be worth an information phone call. But personally, I would get a plumber 1st and get an estimate. That way you know exactly what you are dealing with.

edit: I just saw that you are in Atlanta. So this is possibly a "frozen" pipe issue. There is MORE likely coverage under an insurance policy for frozen pipes. Again coverage varies greatly from company to company and policy to policy to read yours or ask.

Last edited by Sdallnct; 02-01-05 at 05:18 PM.
Old 02-01-05, 05:42 PM
  #10  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,935
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sdallnct
To the OP, if you have wood floor damage and the pipe is in the slab, you might contact your insurance company to see if some coverage is available. Tho you will have to pay your deductible and depending on the policy there may be limited or no coverage, it might be worth an information phone call. But personally, I would get a plumber 1st and get an estimate. That way you know exactly what you are dealing with.

edit: I just saw that you are in Atlanta. So this is possibly a "frozen" pipe issue. There is MORE likely coverage under an insurance policy for frozen pipes. Again coverage varies greatly from company to company and policy to policy to read yours or ask.
Informative post Sdallant. I thought at first it was a busted pipe from the deep freeze this past weekend, but wouldn't a frozen/busted pipe issue keep leaking even after I turn the faucet off outside?

I think I will do what you say and get an estimate. What concerns me is my homeowners policy (Travellers). I listen to Clark Howard sometimes... on his consumer advice show he talks about how many insurance companies are dropping policy owners even for making a small claim. Just $100 can have you dropped.... I actually heard him say he's heard of people being dropped even for inquiring about a problem. His advice is to only use the policy for huge damages, like part of your house burning down.
Old 02-01-05, 10:48 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Just Lurking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Columbia, MO
Posts: 1,175
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You faucet probably has a frost/freeze back point. Here in Missouri, most faucets have a 12 in. frost back. It the actual point that the flow of water is shut off from the spigot portion of the faucet. When turn the handle it turn a rod inside the pipe that pulls back rubber stopper at the 12 in point and allows water follow pass it it. That why a little ater runs out spigot after you tun off the water. After the water drains out, the water is far enough back into house to insulate from freezing. Any remaining water in fauvcet can freeze and expand but not enough to crack the faucet housing.

Did you leave the hose connected? If you did, was the hose full of water? If it was full of water than than water expanded and cracked the ffaucet housing.

Since the faucet has stick further nto the house than the thickness of your intereior wall, the faucet is probably located in perpendicular wall to exterior wall by the faucet. Grab a drywall knife and cut into the wall at the height of the faucet.

Guess how i figued this out? Doh! forgot to disconnect the hose! Once is enough. You will see.
Old 02-01-05, 10:51 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Home again, Big D
Posts: 31,840
Received 62 Likes on 52 Posts
Originally Posted by atlantamoi
I listen to Clark Howard sometimes... on his consumer advice show he talks about how many insurance companies are dropping policy owners even for making a small claim. Just $100 can have you dropped.... I actually heard him say he's heard of people being dropped even for inquiring about a problem. His advice is to only use the policy for huge damages, like part of your house burning down.

Exactly why I say get an estimate 1st. This way if your estimate is near your deductible you are much better off just taking care of it yourself and don't even call your insurance company.

If your estimate is a lot of money, much above your deductible (how much will of course depend on you, but IMHO at least double your deductible), then call your agent and be very specific. Explain that at this time you are not turning in a claim, you just want to know if something like what you have is likely covered, if only part is covered how much, how the claim is handled, etc, etc. Then when you have all the information you can make an informed decision as to turn in a claim.

And yes, I agree if it is a frozen pipe I would think it would leak all the time, but it seems kind of odd that it just started leaking after the big freeze you guys had.
Old 02-02-05, 07:20 AM
  #13  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 7,935
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sdallnct
And yes, I agree if it is a frozen pipe I would think it would leak all the time, but it seems kind of odd that it just started leaking after the big freeze you guys had.
Yeah, I would assume the same, but this was the first time I used the faucet in at least two months.... so, I can't be sure.

Thanks guys for your help.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.