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AH HA! See, I was right!

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AH HA! See, I was right!

Old 01-08-05, 12:06 PM
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AH HA! See, I was right!

About a year ago, I was playing Trivial Pursuit with my girlfriend and her family (we ALWAYS end up playing that game.... sigh...). I had two chances win with the following questions:

1) What does a chronometer measure?

2) In what city was the Star Spangled Banner written?

The answer to #1 is obviously time, but the card said "longitude" (sailors would use time to determine longitude based on the position of the sun in the sky), and they would not give it to me despite this explanation.

The answer to #2 is the tricky. The Star Spangled Banner was written by Francis Scott Key while a prisoner aboard a British ship in a battle with Fort McHenry in Baltimore. I explained all that to them (we took annual school field trips to Fort McHenry in middle school), but the card said "New Orleans".

Eventually, I lost to a team of 3.

Today, the history channel ran a show on the Star Spangled Banner and proved that I was 100% correct in my answer and that the Trivial Pursuit card was 100% wrong.

HA! Eat That!

Of course I can't gloat to my girlfriend or her family or they'll think I'm an *******. Of course you guys already think that, so I don't care.
Old 01-08-05, 12:16 PM
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One time I was forced (against my will!) to play the home edition of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" in a room of 30 people or so (around 15 people per team). One of the questions we received was, "How many different letters are used in Roman numerals?" Everyone said 5 (I, V, X, C, and M) but I said 7 (I, V, X, L, C, D, M) and even explained the values (1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000). "I've never heard of L and D," they said. But since I had been carrying the team up until this point on everything but pop culture-type stuff, they listened to me and answered 7. Denied! The card said 5. I said the game was wrong, and the other team leader said, "Who is probably more right? You, or the game makers?" And we didn't have access to the Internet, so I couldn't even prove I was right.
Old 01-08-05, 12:21 PM
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Moops.
Old 01-08-05, 12:45 PM
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There are lotsa mistakes in Trivial Pursuit cards. One of the creators once said something like, "There are some mistakes. Come on, it's only a game!"
Old 01-08-05, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by matta
About a year ago...
Let it go, matta... let it go. We all go through things in life that set us back a little.

Someone calls us a bad name, writes a trivial pursuit card wrong, pees in our shoes, sleeps with our sister and posts it on the internet... but there comes a time when you have to see that it's not about you, it's about them. They call you bad names because they are insecure, they write trivial pursuit cards wrong because they had their shoes peed in a year earlier, they pee in people's shoes because they don't like you, they sleep with your sister because she's easy and post it on the internet because they really really don't like you... Crap, I just realized something. It's about you.
Old 01-08-05, 01:39 PM
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Chronometers don't measure time ... they keep time (greenwich time) and use it to measure distance between two points - or longitude - by comparing time of day against the time on the clock. You were indeed wrong on that item. In fact, clocks in general don't "measure" anything.

And Francis Scott Key started writing the anthem on his way sailing back to Baltimore and finished it in his hotel. I don't know where they got New Orleans from.
Old 01-08-05, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Breakfast with Girls
One time I was forced (against my will!) to play the home edition of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" in a room of 30 people or so (around 15 people per team). One of the questions we received was, "How many different letters are used in Roman numerals?" Everyone said 5 (I, V, X, C, and M) but I said 7 (I, V, X, L, C, D, M) and even explained the values (1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000). "I've never heard of L and D," they said. But since I had been carrying the team up until this point on everything but pop culture-type stuff, they listened to me and answered 7. Denied! The card said 5. I said the game was wrong, and the other team leader said, "Who is probably more right? You, or the game makers?" And we didn't have access to the Internet, so I couldn't even prove I was right.
Should have popped in any movie made in the 1980's and skipped to the end. It would have said something like: MCMLXXX... for the copyright date.
Old 01-08-05, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
Chronometers don't measure time ... they keep time (greenwich time) and use it to measure distance between two points - or longitude - by comparing time of day against the time on the clock. You were indeed wrong on that item. In fact, clocks in general don't "measure" anything.
Check out the big brain on Trigger . . .

From the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

Main Entry: chro∑nom∑e∑ter
Pronunciation: kr&-'nš-m&-t&r
Function: noun
: TIMEPIECE; especially : one designed to keep time with great accuracy
Old 01-08-05, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
Chronometers don't measure time ... they keep time (greenwich time) and use it to measure distance between two points - or longitude - by comparing time of day against the time on the clock. You were indeed wrong on that item. In fact, clocks in general don't "measure" anything.
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=chronometer

"An exceptionally precise timepiece."


Originally Posted by Trigger
And Francis Scott Key started writing the anthem on his way sailing back to Baltimore and finished it in his hotel. I don't know where they got New Orleans from.
And you ended your sentance with a preposition, but that is also useless information that does not add to the topic.
Old 01-08-05, 02:31 PM
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yeah, but prove that you won Survivor! That'd be something!
Old 01-08-05, 02:31 PM
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why don't you guys check your dictionaries for where it says that "keep" has the same meaning as the word "measure"
Old 01-08-05, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by matta
And you ended your sentance with a preposition, but that is also useless information that does not add to the topic.
You spelled 'sentence' wrong.
Old 01-08-05, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
You spelled 'sentence' wrong.

I know
Old 01-08-05, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
why don't you guys check your dictionaries for where it says that "keep" has the same meaning as the word "measure"
Hey! Don't yell at me . . . I was agreeing with you!
Old 01-08-05, 02:53 PM
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Saying a chronometer measures time is like saying a Carpenter's Square measures inches. It's an incomplete answer at best and you get a D-.

Last edited by Trigger; 01-08-05 at 03:46 PM.
Old 01-08-05, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by talemyn
Hey! Don't yell at me . . . I was agreeing with you!
<small>sorry, didn't mean to yell... that was my normal speaking voice.</small>
Old 01-08-05, 03:52 PM
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You guys are hilarious, I'm just waiting to see who starts throwing dictionaries first...
Old 01-08-05, 06:08 PM
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Hah, this made me laugh if only because the same situation happened while watching the history channel last night though regarding hydrofoils. It has been far to many years to recall the exact question but it was essentially describing how a hydrofoil worked and instead claimed hovercraft was the proper answer.

Hmm, not a winning question but eh it concerned the history channel.
Old 01-08-05, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Talzin
Hah, this made me laugh if only because the same situation happened while watching the history channel last night though regarding hydrofoils. It has been far to many years to recall the exact question but it was essentially describing how a hydrofoil worked and instead claimed hovercraft was the proper answer.

Hmm, not a winning question but eh it concerned the history channel.

I saw that one yesterday. The Navy ship lifted out of the water looked neat.
Old 01-08-05, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
Chronometers don't measure time ... they keep time (greenwich time) and use it to measure distance between two points - or longitude - by comparing time of day against the time on the clock. You were indeed wrong on that item.
Nonsense. That's like arguing that calculators don't perform mathematical operations on abstract numbers, but are used by technophobes for balancing financial accounts.

The term "chronometer" literally means "measuring time." A frequent version of a chronometer is a stopwatch, which, yes, measures the amount of time between hitting Start and hitting Stop. That could be useful for calculating longitude, speed, distance, whatever - but what it does is measure time.

- David Stein
Old 01-08-05, 06:49 PM
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and a chonometer will only tell you your longitude in conjunciton with a spedometer, and a compass, and both of those would have to be watched the entire time you were timing the trip
Old 01-08-05, 06:55 PM
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Nonsense? Do you even know what you're talking about? Chronometers are clocks basically.. they keep time. They were used to measure the distance between two points using greenwich time compared to the angle of the sun. That's what the question was asking...

And your analogy was senseless. So the question could ask "what's a financial calculator used for?" and I could answer "to display the word 'boobless'" and I would be correct?

And if you want to measure time - you need a light-clock and a space-time odometer. http://www.ling.su.se/staff/hartmut/uhr.htm - Not a chronometer.
Old 01-08-05, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Nick Danger
There are lotsa mistakes in Trivial Pursuit cards. One of the creators once said something like, "There are some mistakes. Come on, it's only a game!"
I am reminded of an excellent DS9 episode
Old 01-08-05, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Trigger
Chronometers are clocks basically.. they keep time. They were used to measure the distance between two points using greenwich time compared to the angle of the sun.
Here's a fairly concise summary of the history of chronometers:
The story behind the invention of the Chronometer is an interesting one.

When humanity's fascination with the sea first began many thousands of years ago, we had one major difficulty: if we lost sight of the shore, we were in major trouble. Because we had no means of calculating our location in regards to our origin or destination, we had no real means of navigating except by following the shoreline until we reached something interesting.

With the invention of the sextant, humanity had finally solved half the puzzle. We were able to find our latitude by using the stars as our guide.

But although we had the ability to calculate how far North or South we were, we still had no means of figuring out our longitude, our East/West coordinates. This is why Christopher Columbus thought he was in India -- he had no way of knowing whether he had reached the Far East or not (the Carribean ended up being the named Near East thanks to his screw-up).

Eventually, scientists and navigators figured out that if you know what time it is where you are, and the time in another location, then you can figure out your longitude via some simple subtraction.

Sadly, wristwatches (or even pocketwatches) had not been invented in the 1700's, and the time-keeping devices of the period served better as decorative pieces than reliable timepieces (and, indeed, accuracy was necessary in order to calculate longitude).

And so, in 1714, the British Board of Longitude began a contest. The prize: 20,000 pounds (i.e. millions and millions and millions of dollars by today's inflated standards) to whomever could devise a method to calculate longitude.

A young man by the name of John Harrison dedicated much of his life to finding a solution to this problem, and in 1735 presented his first design to the Board, followed by several more until it was perfected in 1759.

Sadly, although Harrison was the only one to come close to creating an accurate timepiece, the Board decided to give the prize to an astronomer, Nevil Maskelyne, who had devised a rediculously complicated way of calculating longitude involving the moon and several specific stars.

Eventually, at the age of 80, Harrison was given the full award by King George III, but died three years later

It is interesting to note that while Maskelyne was declared the winner, Harrison's method is still in use today, and has only recently begun to be replaced by GPS.
So you're referring to a primary use of a particular kind of chronometer - the marine chronometer - and its original purpose. Today, the term "chronometer" applies generally to any clock- or stopwatch-type timekeeping device. Evidence: an eBay search for "chronometer" turns up 232 items, all of which are standard wristwatches.

The question was not, "What are marine chronometers used to measure?" or "When first invented, what was the chronometer used to measure?" In those cases, the

The question was: "What does a chronometers measure?" Given the present context of the question, the answer is time.

You can continue to argue, Trigger, but the answer seems obvious, and I'm done here. This is the textbook example of a hopelessly geeky debate. It could only be more geeky by (a) occurring on usenet or (b) indirectly referencing Star Trek.

- David Stein
Old 01-08-05, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by sfsdfd
Nonsense. That's like arguing that calculators don't perform mathematical operations on abstract numbers, but are used by technophobes for balancing financial accounts.

The term "chronometer" literally means "measuring time." A frequent version of a chronometer is a stopwatch, which, yes, measures the amount of time between hitting Start and hitting Stop. That could be useful for calculating longitude, speed, distance, whatever - but what it does is measure time.

- David Stein


Understand that I love everyone in this discussion, so I am just making an observation. If someone came here, and the first thing they saw was this post, there is no doubt their first thought would be, "Holy crap, I have landed in the biggest nerdery on the entire internet.

Ahhhhhh. Just one reason I love this place.



Now imagine if they had the fortitude to read past that post and saw this...

Originally Posted by Trigger
Nonsense? Do you even know what you're talking about? Chronometers are clocks basically.. they keep time. They were used to measure the distance between two points using greenwich time compared to the angle of the sun. That's what the question was asking...

And your analogy was senseless. So the question could ask "what's a financial calculator used for?" and I could answer "to display the word 'boobless'" and I would be correct?

And if you want to measure time - you need a light-clock and a space-time odometer. http://www.ling.su.se/staff/hartmut/uhr.htm - Not a chronometer.
I'm guessing we should be beat up by the Alpha Betas at any moment.




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