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College....Is it everything?

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College....Is it everything?

Old 11-01-04, 11:46 AM
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College....Is it everything?

Kind of a weird question I know but do you think College is everything?

I myself have 4 years of Military service and an Associates degree, but I couldn't stomach going the distance with school........I think mainly because I wasn't taking anything that would directly help me after I was done (I was going for a Bachelors degree in Business Administration). It was unbearable in the sense that I felt like I was attending a glorified high school and some of the projects they had us doing were more than laughable - (in all honesty, the work was easy - I only purchased books for the classes that REALLY required them and homework, while a little tedious, was never a burden or felt like too much).

I taught myself everything I know about computers and have some advanced experience (mainly with fixing operating systems).

I see a lot of my friends also passing by others with at least a 4 year degree at their jobs as well (both have equal experience in their fields).

It just seems to me that it's not what is used to be or maybe it never was the answer to everything. Please note as well that just because it wasn't my thing and that I never plan on going back, I would never down somebody for going to college to try and better themselves and I'm not saying it's worthless - I'm only describing what I see now that I have a good career going.
Old 11-01-04, 11:49 AM
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more important now than it has ever been
Old 11-01-04, 11:50 AM
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I think I learned more from being at college than I learned from going to classes. The interaction outside your comfort zone, learning you know nothing, and making lifelong friends turned out to be much more important than any of the classes I attended.
Old 11-01-04, 11:51 AM
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Well, as more and more people go to college, the equivalent worth of having a degree does go down, but it is almost seen as a bare minimum now.


I do agree with you on the glorified high school part in a lot of instances. Do you have any interest in taking any night classes? I found that often times those were actually better, in that the crowd was much mature and took it much more seriously, as they were often older working class people who were really there to get an education.

Last edited by muggins; 11-01-04 at 11:55 AM.
Old 11-01-04, 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by Chew
I think I learned more from being at college than I learned from going to classes. The interaction outside your comfort zone, learning you know nothing, and making lifelong friends turned out to be much more important than any of the classes I attended.


My biggest regret was not getting the full "experience" of dorm life, and on-campus living. When I started school, I had no desire to live in a dorm and share a room with someone I had never met before. Looking back on it now, I wish I had gotten the chance to do that--I would have made a lot of friends, and probably would have a lot of stories to tell. I went to a community college, then transferred to a university. I save a ton of money, but I actually became more responsible because I was paying for my classes at that point.
Old 11-01-04, 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by muggins
Well, as more and more people go to college, the equivalent worth of having a degree does go down.


I do agree with you on the glorified high school part in a lot of instances. Do you have any interest in taking any night classes? I found that often times those were actually better, in that the crowd was much mature and took it much more seriously, as they were often older working class people who were really there to get an education.
Yes, most of my classes were at night and it definitely helped with a more mature interaction with things like group studies and outside projects - but it also made those day classes feel even more like hell.

It's not the thing that bugged me the most at all but it did get on my nerves.
Old 11-01-04, 11:59 AM
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I can't imagine anyone who has the means for college to not go to college.
Old 11-01-04, 12:00 PM
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If you want to know about Everything, ask Dr. Hathaway.
Old 11-01-04, 12:06 PM
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Speaking as a college dropout, I'd say it is valuable indeed. As a frequent member of hiring committees here, I can tell you that many applicants are rejected right off the bat for not meeting educational criteria. I must add, however, that simply having the sheepskin won't get you a job. You have to have the skills, and the ability to prove it in an interview. I was lucky, I am an excellent interviewee and entered the organization at a lower level which required no degree, then worked my way up. Places that allow you to substitute work experience for college are a wise choice. Excuse me, I have more to say but my %$#^%$ing lunch buddies are finally ready to go.
Old 11-01-04, 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by heimerSWT


My biggest regret was not getting the full "experience" of dorm life, and on-campus living. When I started school, I had no desire to live in a dorm and share a room with someone I had never met before. Looking back on it now, I wish I had gotten the chance to do that--I would have made a lot of friends, and probably would have a lot of stories to tell. I went to a community college, then transferred to a university. I save a ton of money, but I actually became more responsible because I was paying for my classes at that point.
I definitely didn't miss any of that - 4 years in the military brought a lot of friends my way and I must say it was the greatest experience of my life so far, what an eye opener.

Good point on the responsibility issue as well - sounds like you were very motivated and focused on your goals
Old 11-01-04, 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by AGuyNamedMike
Speaking as a college dropout, I'd say it is valuable indeed. As a frequent member of hiring committees here, I can tell you that many applicants are rejected right off the bat for not meeting educational criteria. I must add, however, that simply having the sheepskin won't get you a job. You have to have the skills, and the ability to prove it in an interview. I was lucky, I am an excellent interviewee and entered the organization at a lower level which required no degree, then worked my way up. Places that allow you to substitute work experience for college are a wise choice. Excuse me, I have more to say but my %$#^%$ing lunch buddies are finally ready to go.
Very well said
Old 11-01-04, 12:48 PM
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While currently reviewing some applicants for my current position (which I'm leaving on friday), I can tell you that I throw away any resumes w/o at least a 2 year degree. Being in IT, I also look for experience and certs too, but I think a college degree is almost a neccesity nowadays. When your trying to compete with 5 or even 100 other candidates for a job, you have to try to set yourself apart from the others(albiet in a positive way). Not getting a college degree will set you apart in a bad, bad way.
Old 11-01-04, 01:07 PM
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I think post secondary education needs a serious overhaul (all education does actually, in my mind.) It pisses me off. I see a lot of really stupid people going to college because they can afford it, when I can't. I wish it was more elitist and didn't require vast sums of money.

However, it's great to meet people with similar interests, learn some skills you need to learn, and get contacts in an industry you want to work in. I'm sure.
Old 11-01-04, 01:11 PM
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Originally posted by cdollaz
If you want to know about Everything, ask Dr. Hathaway.
Except popcorn, he can't stand popcorn.
Old 11-01-04, 01:58 PM
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as its been mentioned.. a bachelor degree anymore is a bare minimum requirement..

it seems like anymore, everyone is going ahead and getting an mba or masters in their field...
at the current rate, even a bachelor degree may not be enough before too much longer.
Old 11-01-04, 02:55 PM
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A college degree shows that you completed something you set out to do. Some employers like that.
Old 11-01-04, 02:55 PM
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Personally, and this is my opinion. Although a a 4 yr degree is bare minimum right now. I feel that experience vs. a piece of paper will start taking over again. 25 years ago experience was what was needed more than someone with a degree. This is starting to show in IT once again. The field has gotten so watered down that it's so hard to find someone reliable because everyone has the same education. Places of business have started to find that although it looks good on paper it's not always the right choice.

My advice having military experience. IF you can find a good position that pays for education I'd take it. That way you can continue your education taking night classes. Especially if there is room for advancement. A GOOD job that you actually LIKE is hard to come by. Having the experience from the military will be a major plus in your resume.
Old 11-01-04, 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by twikoff
as its been mentioned.. a bachelor degree anymore is a bare minimum requirement..

it seems like anymore, everyone is going ahead and getting an mba or masters in their field...
at the current rate, even a bachelor degree may not be enough before too much longer.
Maybe for most but not entirely necessary. I don't have a college degree (left during my 3rd year) and doing just fine.
Old 11-01-04, 03:49 PM
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You also must take the type of work into consideration. In a structural engineering office (where I work) and most other engineering offices you don't get a position without a 4 year degree, you won't even be considered. It would be pointless not to require that. An engineering degree is very specialized and not something you can just learn from working in an engineering office. Even now bachelor degrees are becoming so common that a graduate degree is becoming a must. My office generally doesn't hire anyone without a master's, I may go back to school to get my master's eventually.

In a more general field things might be different. College is an easy way for employers to weed through a large list of applicants. A degree can only be a positive thing, obviously you have the opportunity to do well without it but many more opportunities will be open for you with a degree.
Old 11-01-04, 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by msdmoney
You also must take the type of work into consideration. In a structural engineering office (where I work) and most other engineering offices you don't get a position without a 4 year degree, you won't even be considered. It would be pointless not to require that. An engineering degree is very specialized and not something you can just learn from working in an engineering office. Even now bachelor degrees are becoming so common that a graduate degree is becoming a must. My office generally doesn't hire anyone without a master's, I may go back to school to get my master's eventually.

In a more general field things might be different. College is an easy way for employers to weed through a large list of applicants. A degree can only be a positive thing, obviously you have the opportunity to do well without it but many more opportunities will be open for you with a degree.
I was just pointing out that not 'everyone' must have one. Now for your field it may be so competitive that it is, as you say, 'weeding process' to pick out the good ones. No doubt, very hard to stick out if you are not at least as smart, or paper smart, as the other guy.
Old 11-01-04, 04:02 PM
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Presuming you're not trying to go into a profession that relies solely on talent and contacts (i.e. the entertainment industry), yeah, it's important. As someone else said, however, the system needs a major overhaul. My friend and I were discussing this the other day. I felt what was needed was that you simply took classes that interested you/pertained to your intended profession. You accumulate credits by taking those classes. Your potential employers see what classes you've taken. You only would need a degree for certain things, like to be a medical doctor or an engineer.
Old 11-01-04, 05:19 PM
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even if you can get a job... you gotta wonder how far you can go with it

everyone i know, that doesnt have a degree.. is obviously capped in their current positions, with little room to rise in either position or pay.
Old 11-01-04, 05:36 PM
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I think I'll go against the grain and say that the value of college is limited. I never went to college and have nearly always gone up in salary when job hopping as I honed my computer skills. I have been blessed with a modest amount artistic talent and negotiation skills (ie talking people into giving me a chance at things outside my experience) and in many cases have achieved more than my peers with a professional education. So basically if you're pursuing something you like to do, its easier to devour learning opportunities and experience.

I would have liked to experience many of the good college experiences that Ive heard about, but at the times in my life when my parents offered to send me to school, I wasnt ready.

Ive met many people out of college with the attitude of 'now what'. Having followed the rules and want things handed to them.

Im sure many people have benefited greatly from college, but it just wasnt for me and my career has not suffered for it.

Last edited by Save Ferris; 11-01-04 at 05:40 PM.
Old 11-01-04, 05:41 PM
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It's still as important as ever. However, having a Bachelors now is almost as having a high school diploma in the past - nothing special. Someone at work got turned down for the FBI because he "only" had a Bachelors, so now he's going to go get a Masters and then reapply.
Old 11-01-04, 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by Save Ferris
Ive met many people out of college with the attitude of 'now what'. Having followed the rules and want things handed to them.
I agree...

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