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View Poll Results: The lack of motivation by other countries to help in Iraq is mainly...
to spite the US.
10
58.82%
a lack of real concern about Iraq's future.
3
17.65%
based on the fact they don't see it as their problem.
6
35.29%
based on something else (please explain).
3
17.65%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

U.N. & Iraq

Old 10-20-04, 03:20 PM
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Iraqi Official Derides U.N. Election Prep

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...=540&ncid=1478
Iraqi Official Derides U.N. Election Prep

By RAWYA RAGEH, Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD, Iraq - The United Nations (news - web sites) has not sent enough election workers to help out with vital balloting in Iraq (news - web sites) set for January, the Iraqi foreign minister said Wednesday.

The United Nations pulled its international staff out of Iraq a year ago following bombings at its Baghdad headquarters. U.N. chief Kofi Annan (news - web sites) has since allowed a small team to return to help with elections but won't expand it without greater protection for them amid Iraq's increasing violence.

"It is unfortunate that the contribution and participation of U.N. employees in this process is not up to expectations," Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari told reporters.

Zebari said a "very limited" number of U.N. employees were expected to arrive to help out with elections. He said the number expected in Iraq was far smaller than the 300 workers the United Nations sent for the first elections in East Timor (news - web sites) which has a much smaller population and land area.

"Judging by the size of the process in Iraq and its complexity, we definitely need a larger U.N. presence in Iraq, at least to bestow trust upon the electoral process," Zebari said.

Annan said Tuesday that had tried to raise international troops to form a brigade to protect for U.N. workers, so more staffers could be sent, but he had gotten no response.

"We have not done very well. It is the same governments who are asking me to send in my civilian staff who are not going to give me troops to protect them," he said, without singling out any nations.

Annan pulled out international staff after the two anit-U.N. bombings and a spate of attacks on humanitarian workers. The first bombing, on Aug. 22, 2003, killed the top U.N. envoy, Sergio Viera de Mello, and 21 others.

In August, Annan allowed a small U.N. contingent to return to Baghdad to help organize the election. Annan imposed a ceiling of 35 international staffers, despite pressure from the United States and elsewhere to boost that figure. However, the United Nations is training Iraqis outside Iraq to return here and train other Iraqis in how to run an election.

Zebari, a Kurdish politician who served as foreign minister during the U.S. occupation, said Iraq will raise the issue of greater U.N. and international support during a conference on Iraq to be held next month in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik.

He said the Iraqi delegation will not only ask for greater U.N. participation but will also call on conference participants to "support this electoral process seriously and in good intentions."

The conference will bring together Iraq's neighbors, the eight major industrialized powers and China, the United Nations, the Arab League, the Organization of Islamic Conference and the European Union (news - web sites).

"It is important for Iraq to garner the support of the countries participating in the Sharm el-Sheik conference ... to help in providing the positive and suitable political ambiance, and encouraging all parties to participate positively; and to provide monitors and technical help," Zebari said.

Earlier this month, two organizations representing more than 60,000 United Nations staff members urged Annan to pull all U.N. staff out of Iraq because of the "unprecedented" risk to their safety and security.

In a joint letter to Annan, the staff organizations cited a dramatic escalation in attacks in Iraq and said the United Nations regrettably "has become a direct target, one that is particularly prone to attacks by ruthless extremist terrorist factions."
Old 10-20-04, 04:26 PM
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to spite the Bush administration.
Old 10-20-04, 04:51 PM
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Agreed.
Old 10-20-04, 04:53 PM
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I thought it was a combo of 1 and 2.

They're clearly happy spiting the US, but in doing so, they obviously don't give a shit about the Iraqis.

birrman54
Old 10-20-04, 08:29 PM
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Spite.
Old 10-23-04, 12:39 AM
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http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...=574&ncid=1473

UN Declines to Train Iraqis for Saddam Trial

Fri Oct 22, 8:09 PM ET

Add to My Yahoo! World - Reuters

By Evelyn Leopold

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The United Nations (news - web sites) has rejected a request from Iraqi leaders to train some 30 judges and prosecutors who would be trying former President Saddam Hussein (news - web sites), in part because Baghdad has the death penalty, a U.N. spokesman said on Friday.



The request was made to Carla del Ponte, chief prosecutor at the U.N. war crimes tribunal on the former Yugoslavia in the Hague, but U.N. Secretary-General Annan turned it down, spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

He said del Ponte and the court were under pressure to meet target dates to complete their work and that the United Nations had no mandate to help train Iraqi judges. Judicial assistance, however, was among the tasks the world body could undertake in Iraq (news - web sites) in previous Security Council resolutions.

Dujarric also said the request was rejected because "serious doubts exist regarding the capability of the Iraqi special tribunal to meet relevant international standards."

"The secretary-general recently stated that U.N. officials should not be directly involved in lending assistance to any court or tribunal that is empowered to impose the death penalty," he said in answer to questions.

Annan's position was first reported by the New York Times, which said that a weeklong training session for Iraqi judges and prosecutors chosen to try Saddam and his key associates ended in London on Monday. Both Iraqis and their Western advisers agreed that Iraqis were unprepared to undertake full-fledged trials soon.

The London courses were organized by American lawyers who assist Iraqi investigators and judges in Baghdad. Britain sent legal experts to the training sessions but Iraqis were not expected to be ready to start proceedings next month as originally planned.

The United Nations is assisting in Iraqi elections, planned for January, training Iraqi elections workers in Mexico and other places outside the country, who in turn train others. Dujarric said 6,000 Iraqis had completed direct or indirect training and were setting up 585 voter registration stations.

Annan has said plans for elections were technically feasible but that the decision was up to the Iraqis. "It's their call, not ours," he told reporters on Thursday.

The world body has only eight international electoral workers in Baghdad, part of the more than 30 staff housed in the capital's fortified Green Zone.

Annan pulled out international staff last October after two deadly attacks on U.N. offices in Baghdad. In August, a U.N. contingent took up residence the Green Zone, but Annan kept it small because of the violence.

He has acknowledged it will be necessary to send in more staff before the election but wants better security for them.

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