Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk
Reload this Page >

Why does France have such relevance?

Other Talk "Otterville"

Why does France have such relevance?

Old 10-07-04, 02:41 PM
  #1  
DVD Talk Hero
Thread Starter
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,438
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Why does France have such relevance?

I mean, other than their constant pontificating...

Yes, they are a nuclear power. Yes, they are a pretty big blob on the map, but considering that was once Germany on a map, that shouldn't count.

Why are we constantly hearing what France has to say about things... there are a lot of countries in this world.

Is it simply their loud voice or is there more that I'm missing?

Is it their economic standing? International policies? Alliances? Military strength?

Come on now, I really want to hear what Norway, Finland and Lithuania have to say about things. Why is France's opinion so much more worth mentioning?
Old 10-07-04, 02:43 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 8,572
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
They are member of the Security Council, therefore they have a voice. You can't kick some out of the UN, even if you think they are a former world power.
Old 10-07-04, 02:44 PM
  #3  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Shazam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Canuckistan
Posts: 10,027
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
They made French Fries? Oh wait, that was the Belgiums
Old 10-07-04, 02:53 PM
  #4  
Admin
 
VinVega's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Herding cats
Posts: 35,063
Received 367 Likes on 235 Posts
Good wine?
Old 10-07-04, 02:54 PM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 34,020
Received 717 Likes on 509 Posts
Yes, I want to know what Lichtenstein and Andorra have to say too.
Old 10-07-04, 02:54 PM
  #6  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 25,058
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Mostly, it's history. France was a very important nation both diplomatically and militarily, and when the definition of important was "Europe", they were the big kid on the block. Coupled with the fact that there really aren't any better candidates for "important nation", they have benefited from political carryover.
Old 10-07-04, 02:56 PM
  #7  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 127,000
Received 326 Likes on 264 Posts
I'm still wondering why French is one of the 2 main (only) choices for foreign language study in most US high schools.
Old 10-07-04, 03:11 PM
  #8  
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 6,733
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The French have been irrelevant for over 150 years. They have yet to realize that.

http://www.brokennewz.com/worldnews/frenchbashing.asp

French-Bashing to Be Olympic Sport

Geneva - At its annual meeting, the International Olympic Committee has decided to add French-Bashing to its roster of medal sports in both the Summer and Winter Games.

"We thought it was about time," said Jesus de Manuel y Corazon, Chairman of the IOC and the 1968 European French-Bashing Champion. "Everbody hates those little lying, cowardly, collaborating, garlic-eating, never-bathing, nose-picking French bastards. It's time that French-Bashing was recognized for the truly international sport that it is, one, I might add, that is much more popular than soccer."

In Summer French-Bashing the Basher runs along a 25 meter path to the Bashee (or the Pierre as it is sometimes called), a typical French sissy picked randomly from the Paris phone book. The first phase of the Bash is called Verbal Bashing in which the Basher has 20 seconds to hurl insults at the Bashee until he starts to cry like a little girl. Then comes the second phase, or Physical Bashing in which the Basher whacks the Bashee over the head with a baseball bat. Play continues until the Bashee surrenders, which in most cases happens immediately because the Bashee is a scairdy-cat Frog after all. Scoring is similar to that in diving in which points are awarded on style, technique and degree of difficulty.

Winter French-Bashing resembles its Summer counterpart with the exception that the Basher approaches the Bashee on skis.

Sports writers are predicting French-Bashing to be the biggest spectator sport of all time, with the potential of billions of dollars in TV revenues and hundreds of millions of dollars in endorsement contracts for world-class bashers.

The United States and Great Britain are already being touted as gold medal contenders for the 2006 Games, with Canada (the only country to produce both world-class bashers and bashees) a very serious challenger.
Old 10-07-04, 03:17 PM
  #9  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 34,020
Received 717 Likes on 509 Posts
Not nearly as irrelevant as your posts in threads about France. Why you are allowed to continue to threadcrap in these threads is mindboggling.
Old 10-07-04, 03:20 PM
  #10  
DVD Talk Hero
Thread Starter
 
Th0r S1mpson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 36,438
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Originally posted by Red Dog
I'm still wondering why French is one of the 2 main (only) choices for foreign language study in most US high schools.
Because they're one of the only countries who refuses to speak English?

I wish Italian was taught in public schools... they're the same way (proud of their language).

Spanish is obviously the most practical for americans to learn, or Japanese, depending on which direction you are headed.
Old 10-07-04, 03:25 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Hero
 
JasonF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 42,420
Received 18 Likes on 12 Posts
Originally posted by icondude
The French have been irrelevant for over 150 years. They have yet to realize that.
Patently untrue. They didn't really lose their stature as a world power until their colonial empire fell apart in the wake of World War II.

If I were picking permanent members of the U.N. Security Council today, I wouldn't put France on it, but then again, I probably wouldn't put Russia on it either.
Old 10-07-04, 03:26 PM
  #12  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 127,000
Received 326 Likes on 264 Posts
Originally posted by Thor Simpson


Spanish is obviously the most practical for americans to learn, or Japanese, depending on which direction you are headed.

There are many more relevant languages than French (besides Spanish): German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese, and Japanese to start. Those languages should be offered before French.
Old 10-07-04, 03:30 PM
  #13  
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: In mourning
Posts: 27,412
Received 164 Likes on 114 Posts
Originally posted by JasonF
Patently untrue. They didn't really lose their stature as a world power until their colonial empire fell apart in the wake of World War II.

If I were picking permanent members of the U.N. Security Council today, I wouldn't put France on it, but then again, I probably wouldn't put Russia on it either.

I'd go for a Security Council of two, maybe three members.

You can guess which nations.


Old 10-07-04, 03:34 PM
  #14  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 34,020
Received 717 Likes on 509 Posts
Originally posted by Thor Simpson
Because they're one of the only countries who refuses to speak English?

Not sure if I should laugh hysterically or breakdown crying...
Old 10-07-04, 03:34 PM
  #15  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Balanced on the Biggest Wave
Posts: 2,561
Received 3 Likes on 3 Posts
Originally posted by Pharoh
I'd go for a Security Council of two, maybe three members.

You can guess which nations.


Who's the third? Poland?

Old 10-07-04, 03:43 PM
  #16  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Kittydreamer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 13,605
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally posted by Red Dog
I'm still wondering why French is one of the 2 main (only) choices for foreign language study in most US high schools.
I think it's because French is the language of the diplomate, or so I was once told.

I took German in high school. It's really come in handy!
Old 10-07-04, 03:44 PM
  #17  
DVD Talk Hero
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 25,058
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally posted by Red Dog
There are many more relevant languages than French (besides Spanish): German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese, and Japanese to start. Those languages should be offered before French.
Why would German and Russian be more relevant to the average American than French?
Old 10-07-04, 03:47 PM
  #18  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Lower Appalachia
Posts: 2,908
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally posted by Red Dog
I'm still wondering why French is one of the 2 main (only) choices for foreign language study in most US high schools.
This is another carryover from France's importance in Europe in the past. At one time, it was the language of diplomacy and all (well most anyway) negotiations, contracts, treaties, etc. were written in French and as such became the unofficial offical language of government and especially diplomacy in Europe. The language spoken in most of the royal families was French and not the native language; I believe this was particularly pervasive in Russia and continued up to the revolution. The intertwined royal families of Europe most if not all with connections to France may have been a factor in it gaining importance as an as the unofficial "official" language of Europe.

Benjamin Franklin was an enormous asset to the early formation of the U.S. for many of his talents, not the least of which was his fluency in French, which no doubt was a significant factor in his appointment as ambassador to France and securing that country as the U.S.A.'s first ally.

These are all generalizations of course but the notion that an "educated" person will know some French still carries some credence today (justifiably or not) because of its wide usage in the past.
Old 10-07-04, 03:50 PM
  #19  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 127,000
Received 326 Likes on 264 Posts
Originally posted by TracerBullet
Why would German and Russian be more relevant to the average American than French?

My guess is more trade and business takes place btwn the US and Germany. Russia is far more relevant in the world and to the US than France.
Old 10-07-04, 03:52 PM
  #20  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 127,000
Received 326 Likes on 264 Posts
Originally posted by obscurelabel
This is another carryover from France's importance in Europe in the past. At one time, it was the language of diplomacy and all (well most anyway) negotiations, contracts, treaties, etc. were written in French and as such became the unofficial offical language of government and especially diplomacy in Europe. The language spoken in most of the royal families was French and not the native language; I believe this was particularly pervasive in Russia and continued up to the revolution. The intertwined royal families of Europe most if not all with connections to France may have been a factor in it gaining importance as an as the unofficial "official" language of Europe.

Benjamin Franklin was an enormous asset to the early formation of the U.S. for many of his talents, not the least of which was his fluency in French, which no doubt was a significant factor in his appointment as ambassador to France and securing that country as the U.S.A.'s first ally.

These are all generalizations of course but the notion that an "educated" person will know some French still carries some credence today (justifiably or not) because of its wide usage in the past.

I understand why French was pushed up through the 80s when I was in high school. I just think in today's world, it would make far more sense for US educators to push Spanish and other languages over French.
Old 10-07-04, 03:54 PM
  #21  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Earth
Posts: 5,863
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I think alot of people are overlooking one of the reasons why French is taught in practically every school. Much like Spanish, it's a helluva lot easier for your average American high school kid to learn than German, Japanese, or Arabic (though frankly, even though it's more important now than ever before to have American adults that can speak and translate Arabic, with the climate of the world the way it is somehow I don't see it being a popular choice in schools anyway).
As for France itself, sure they're not as important as they once were they're just one of many countries like that.
Old 10-07-04, 03:58 PM
  #22  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 127,000
Received 326 Likes on 264 Posts
Originally posted by Cardiff Giant
I think alot of people are overlooking one of the reasons why French is taught in practically every school. Much like Spanish, it's a helluva lot easier for your average American high school kid to learn than German, Japanese, or Arabic (though frankly, even though it's more important now than ever before to have American adults that can speak and translate Arabic, with the climate of the world the way it is somehow I don't see it being a popular choice in schools anyway).
As for France itself, sure they're not as important as they once were they're just one of many countries like that.

I thought of that, but if ease of learning is the reason, then I would think schools would just offer Spanish. At least there is a good use for Spanish.
Old 10-07-04, 04:08 PM
  #23  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Lower Appalachia
Posts: 2,908
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally posted by Red Dog
I understand why French was pushed up through the 80s when I was in high school. I just think in today's world, it would make far more sense for US educators to push Spanish and other languages over French.
Ahh, sorry I didn't take your meaning completely

The only thing that I can think of is inertia and tradition. If one were listing the most useful languages today, what would they be? Arabic, Chinese (probably Mandarin over Cantonese, I'm not sure), Spanish, Japanese, Russian could all have cases made for them as being more relevant for U.S. speakers ... would these have been the same 20 years ago? And will they be the same ones 20 years from now? I don't know if anyone can be sure, educators are just making an educated guess as to what will be important in the future. The hundreds of years of tradition of teaching French is probably the only thing going for it at this point.

Of course, Latin is still taught to some degree today even though being more or less "dead" for over fifteen centuries. Even as recently as ... I don't know ... 150 years ago perhaps? ... Latin was a "de facto" requirement for pusuit of higher learning in the sciences, law, religion, etc.
Old 10-07-04, 04:09 PM
  #24  
DVD Talk Legend
 
nevermind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Illinoyze
Posts: 10,513
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
My niece is in 4th grade and has a mandatory Spanish class.
Old 10-07-04, 05:44 PM
  #25  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Earth
Posts: 5,863
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
in terms of Spanish or French, I agree Spanish is much more useful especially in certain parts of the country (California, Texas, the south west) but even here in cold New England I can drive a few minutes down the road and probably find someone who speaks only Spanish. My guess is unless I keep driving north to Quebec, I'm not gonna find alot of French speakers

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.