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Old 08-11-18, 06:51 PM   #1
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The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I first started listening to hip-hop in my early teens ('91 or so) and was the main type of music I listened to until probably my mid twenties. I still listen to some hip-hop now but my sweet spot is mid 90's to early 00's. But like most people I tend to relisten to the same stuff over and over again so to expand my listening and find classics I've missed and reappreciate albums I've already listened to I made myself a project. So starting with 1992 I scoured the internet for best of lists and took the cream of the crop and I came up with 14 albums from 1992 that I will be listening to (some for the first time and some I'm familar with) and writing some thoughts (and a personal letter grade) on each one. I plan on doing two a week. So here's the list of albums I will be listening to:

Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby
Das EFX -- Dead Serious
Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics - Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop
Dr. Dre -- The Chronic
EPMD -- Business Never Personal
Eric B & Rakim -- Don't Sweat the Technique
Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal
Gang Starr -- Daily Operation
Ice Cube -- The Predator
Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die
Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth -- Mecca and the Soul Brother
The Pharcyde -- Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde
Redman -- Whut? Thee Album
Showbiz & AG -- Runaway Slave


I don't see much hip-hop talk around here so I'm not expecting a ton of feedback but I'd love to get thoughts about these albums or other albums you love from 1992.
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Old 08-11-18, 10:37 PM   #2
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I decided just to do alphabetical order so my first album was:


Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby

I had heard of Compton's Most Wanted previously but I'm pretty sure I've never listened to them and I don't think I've ever listened to a MC Eiht (the main rapper of the group) album either but I have heard him guest on other people's stuff so I went into this one pretty blind. I've never really gotten into a lot of West Coast gangsta rap other then the big names (Death Row, Ice Cube, NWA, etc) and before making this list I didn't realize "Music to Driveby" was considered one of the great gangsta rap albums.

So after a few listens I can see why it's held in high regard. It's a solid album with good production, a great rapper in MC Eiht, and it still holds up well today. The themes can get a little repetitive over the 18 tracks but MC Eiht's flow keeps things moving. The album only features one guest appearance by Scarface (from the Geto Boys) on N 2 Deep and he fits in well on one of the standout songs. Overall I don't think it's going to change anyone's opinion if they don't like gangsta rap but I would recommend it to fans of the genre and I will definitely be adding some of the songs to my playlists.


Favorite Tracks: Hood Took Me Under, N 2 Deep (featuring Scarface), Def Wish II, Jack Mode

Letter Grade: B

Last edited by The Questyen; 08-12-18 at 05:24 PM.
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Old 08-12-18, 12:38 AM   #3
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

Isn't Dre's Chronic '93?
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Old 08-12-18, 09:20 AM   #4
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

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Isn't Dre's Chronic '93?
Nope December of 1992. Doggystyle was 93.
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Old 08-12-18, 09:38 AM   #5
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

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Originally Posted by The Questyen View Post
Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby
Das EFX -- Dead Serious
Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics - Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop
Dr. Dre -- The Chronic
EPMD -- Business Never Personal
Eric B & Rakim -- Don't Sweat the Technique
Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal
Gang Starr -- Daily Operation
Ice Cube -- The Predator
Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die
Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth -- Mecca and the Soul Brother
The Pharcyde -- Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde
Redman -- Whut? Thee Album
Showbiz & AG -- Runaway Slave
I'm kind of in the same boat as you, as I like hip-hop and have a few artists that I listen to a lot, but also admit to it having quite a few blind spots.

Of the ones you listed, I'm most familiar with The Chronic and The Predator. Both really great albums.

Looking forward to hearing your opinions on everything.
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Old 08-12-18, 01:47 PM   #6
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

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Old 08-12-18, 02:33 PM   #7
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

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If I had made the list even 1 or 2 albums bigger that would have been on it. The thing is I've heard a lot of Beastie Boys in my life (I've even owned some of their albums) at least enough to know they're not for me.
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Old 08-12-18, 05:18 PM   #8
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Das EFX -- Dead Serious

As a young kid in the pre-internet days Yo MTV Raps and Rap City on BET were how you found out about new hip-hop. I remember seeing the video for "They Want EFX" and being obsessed with it. I'm pretty sure I bought the cassette single (another way you found out about music) and then eventually got the whole album from either BMG or Columbia House. I don't remember listening to the whole album much though other then the big hits.

So let me start with the bad news: There is no unedited version of this album (which caused me to remember why I didn't listen to it much back then). Even the 25th anniversary special edition that came out last year is a clean version with all the swear words edited out with that annoying sound effect where they jumble the word. Thankfully the 3 best songs on the albums don't have a lot of swearing so you only get 1 or 2 of those edits. But unfortunately this happens like 20 or so times on some songs which to me makes them unlistenable.

The good news: "Dead Serious" is a great album. The duo has a very distinctive rapping style and the songs are infectious and full of pop-culture references before that became popular. It's only 10 tracks long so it never wears out it's welcome. The aforementioned editing knocks it down a bit in my book but I'm glad I went back to check this album out because I had forgot how great some of these tracks are.


Favorite Tracks: Mic Checka, They Want EFX, Jussummen, Straight Out the Sewer, Klap Ya Handz

Letter Grade: A-
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Old 08-13-18, 10:11 PM   #9
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I haven't listened to CMW but I will check it out now. As for the other, I love Das EFX despite the backmasking of curse words. To me, it's still a very funny album and it's a trip to hear a lot of those pop culture references even today.

1992 was the year I really got into hip hop, so this project will be a treat. Of those you listed, I am a fan of quite a few of the albums/artists.

I always considered Cypress Hill's debut, LL Cool J's Mama Said Knock You Out, Public Enemy's Apocalypse 91, and Black Sheep's debut A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing to be 92 albums because their videos played so much throughout the year, but they're actually 91 releases (much as The Chronic is typically viewed as a 93 album but you are correct, it came out in 92).

Amazing that both De La Soul and A Tribe Called Quest skipped releasing albums in 92.
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Old 08-14-18, 08:34 PM   #10
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

All of the albums you listed range from great to classic. 1992-1994 is a gold mine year for hip hop.

I would gladly provide recommendations or thoughts for anyone looking to get more into this genre. Feel free to ask away.

I would categorize them in this manner:

Classic
Das EFX -- Dead Serious
Dr. Dre -- The Chronic
Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die
The Pharcyde -- Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde

Near classic
Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby
Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics - Stunts, Blunts & Hip-HoPete Rock & C.L. Smooth -- Mecca and the Soul Brother
Redman -- Whut? Thee Album

Great

EPMD -- Business Never Personal
Eric B & Rakim -- Don't Sweat the Technique
Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal
Gang Starr -- Daily Operation
Ice Cube -- The Predator
Showbiz & AG -- Runaway Slave

The albums you listed all have inner-connections with a lot of each other. Showbiz & AG and Diamond D were part of the collective DITC (diggin in the crates). Showbiz produced Runaway Slave and Diamond D produced most his solo. Runaway Slave is the album debut of Big L and when you hear his verse you'll know which one he is by the greatness of it.

EPMD, Redman, and Das EFX were in the collective The Hit Squad. You'll find they appear on one another's albums the more you dig into the catelog.

Gang Starr is fully produced by DJ Premier, arguably one (is the best imo) rap producers ofa ll time.

The Predator is the beginning of the end of Ice Cube's career. IT's a solid release, but all of his previous solo albums are a lot better and some of the best rap albums ever made.

Kool G rap is one of the best rappers ever and is in my top 3. He created a style that was improved/imitated throughout the years. Amazing storytelling on that release, amazing production, and a wide range of topics. He's not mentioned or known by causal fans, but "hip hop heads" know he's one of the best. I think the one you listed is his personal best album so I envy you for hearing it for the first time.

The Rakim release is solid, but the previous material is better.

Pharcyde is a bit more carefree and upbeat, but again, wide range of topics, each member has a distinct voice and style. The don't make releases like that anymore.

Pete Rock and CL Smooth is an amzing debut, but a bit too long for my tastes. Lots of classic songs.

I'm kind of shocked you didn't like CMW as much. It's the best MC Eiht album ever made and features top notch production and a very laid back west coast sound like you'll notice with Dr. Dre.

You will disocver while listening to tehse releases the distinct east coast hip hop sound vs west. East coast is more sample based and a bit grimier/rougher while the west coast sound/style is more laid back, longer/deeper bass, and while they're great rappers, the emphasis isn't necessiarly so much on skill (rakim/kool g rap/redman), but more on the mood and style.

Last edited by Lipid; 08-14-18 at 08:44 PM.
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Old 08-14-18, 09:03 PM   #11
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I love Redman. He has one of my most favorite discographies in hip hop history. Whut? Thee Album is a classic - don't know if I consider it or Muddy Waters as his best album.

Quote:
Gang Starr is fully produced by DJ Premier, arguably one (is the best imo) rap producers ofa ll time.
Have you listened to Kolexxxion by Bumpy Knuckles (Freddie Foxxx) and DJ Premier? Highly recommended. I need to get around to listening to Daily Operation again, it's been too long.
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Old 08-14-18, 09:26 PM   #12
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

When you get to EPMD's Business Never Personal, make sure you also listen to this b-side from the "Crossover" single:


I have no idea why it wasn't on the album as it's one of their best songs IMO.
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Old 08-14-18, 10:30 PM   #13
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lipid View Post
All of the albums you listed range from great to classic. 1992-1994 is a gold mine year for hip hop.

I would gladly provide recommendations or thoughts for anyone looking to get more into this genre. Feel free to ask away.

I would categorize them in this manner:

Classic
Das EFX -- Dead Serious
Dr. Dre -- The Chronic
Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die
The Pharcyde -- Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde

Near classic
Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby
Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics - Stunts, Blunts & Hip-HoPete Rock & C.L. Smooth -- Mecca and the Soul Brother
Redman -- Whut? Thee Album

Great

EPMD -- Business Never Personal
Eric B & Rakim -- Don't Sweat the Technique
Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal
Gang Starr -- Daily Operation
Ice Cube -- The Predator
Showbiz & AG -- Runaway Slave

The albums you listed all have inner-connections with a lot of each other. Showbiz & AG and Diamond D were part of the collective DITC (diggin in the crates). Showbiz produced Runaway Slave and Diamond D produced most his solo. Runaway Slave is the album debut of Big L and when you hear his verse you'll know which one he is by the greatness of it.

EPMD, Redman, and Das EFX were in the collective The Hit Squad. You'll find they appear on one another's albums the more you dig into the catelog.

Gang Starr is fully produced by DJ Premier, arguably one (is the best imo) rap producers ofa ll time.

The Predator is the beginning of the end of Ice Cube's career. IT's a solid release, but all of his previous solo albums are a lot better and some of the best rap albums ever made.

Kool G rap is one of the best rappers ever and is in my top 3. He created a style that was improved/imitated throughout the years. Amazing storytelling on that release, amazing production, and a wide range of topics. He's not mentioned or known by causal fans, but "hip hop heads" know he's one of the best. I think the one you listed is his personal best album so I envy you for hearing it for the first time.

The Rakim release is solid, but the previous material is better.

Pharcyde is a bit more carefree and upbeat, but again, wide range of topics, each member has a distinct voice and style. The don't make releases like that anymore.

Pete Rock and CL Smooth is an amzing debut, but a bit too long for my tastes. Lots of classic songs.

I'm kind of shocked you didn't like CMW as much. It's the best MC Eiht album ever made and features top notch production and a very laid back west coast sound like you'll notice with Dr. Dre.

You will discover while listening to these releases the distinct east coast hip hop sound vs west. East coast is more sample based and a bit grimier/rougher while the west coast sound/style is more laid back, longer/deeper bass, and while they're great rappers, the emphasis isn't necessarily so much on skill (rakim/kool g rap/redman), but more on the mood and style.
Thanks for the detailed post! I know this post was meant for everyone reading and not just me but to clarify I haven't listened to the majority of these 1992 albums but I am pretty familiar with most of the artists going forward. Gang Starr is one of my favorite groups and I've listened to The Chronic probably hundreds of time in my life. I've listened to a ton of Big L & Redman also.
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Old 08-15-18, 01:37 AM   #14
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics -- Stunts, Blunts, & Hip-Hop

Most of my knowledge of Diamond D comes from him as a producer and hearing him on the D.I.T.C. group album which I was a big fan of. So I figured this was going to be a typical producer album (like Pete Rock's Soul Survivor album for example) where they rap occasionally but it's mainly focused on more skilled rappers. Surprisingly it's not that and he is the sole rapper on probably two thirds of the album. The other tracks feature various members of the aforementioned D.I.T.C. crew including some early Fat Joe verses and Brand Nubian.

This album lives on its beats. The tracks sound great with Diamond producing the entire album (with co-producers on some tracks). The rapping is secondary as while Diamond is a decent rapper the lyrics in spots are mediocre so I would have liked to see a better mix of other rappers to help liven up that part of the album. It's still solid I just didn't connect with it as much I thought I would.

Sidenote: Weird that 2 out of the 3 albums so far have had lines about Donald Trump. There is no escape!



Favorite Tracks: "Best Kept Secret", "Step To Me", "Check One, Two", "Stunts, Blunts, & Hip-Hop"

Letter Grade: B-
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Old 08-15-18, 01:22 PM   #15
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

CMW's Music to Driveby is one of the best albums of its era. Regardless of genre. I still throw it on occasionally to this day. Even the shoutout track is hot.
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Old 08-15-18, 05:54 PM   #16
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I had Dre, Ice Cube, and the EPMD albums from that list and after that you and leaving high school I began to phase out of hip hip.
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Old 08-15-18, 07:53 PM   #17
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

From 1990 to around '92, rap is all I listened to until GNR came out with the Illusions albums & got me into rock. I remember all these albums very well.
Compton's Most Wanted -- Music to Driveby: Didnt like any tracks from this album, but Growin up in the Hood from the previous album was great.
Das EFX -- Dead Serious: Obviously They Want EFX (The remix was even better)
Diamond and the Psychotic Neurotics - Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop: never heard of them
Dr. Dre -- The Chronic: Too many to name
EPMD -- Business Never Personal: Headbanger, Crossover was on of their best
Eric B & Rakim -- Don't Sweat the Technique. Title cut & Know the Ledge
Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal: Ring the Alarm & true Fushnick
Gang Starr -- Daily Operation: Ex to the Next & Take It Personal
Ice Cube -- The Predator: Was never a big fan of Cube but I liked the singles Check Yo Self & Good Day
Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die: Only song I ever liked from them was Erase Racism which wasnt on this album.
Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth -- Mecca and the Soul Brother: Great album. Reminisce, Cant Front on Me, Straighten It Out. These guys had their own sound & were one of my faves. They also had a song called The Creator from I believe their previous album which I totally forgot about until I heard it in a commercial recently.
The Pharcyde -- Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde: Not a fan
Redman -- Whut? Thee Album: Also not a fan
Showbiz & AG -- Runaway Slave[/B]. Never heard.

There were many more great tracks from '92. Problem is a lot of these albums only had 1 good track on them. You should do 1990 then '91 next.

Last edited by JZ1276; 08-15-18 at 07:59 PM.
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Old 08-16-18, 01:29 AM   #18
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I am huge, huge EPMD fan. I think Crossover may have been their highest-charting hit. Business Never Personal is a bittersweet album because Erick Sermon and PMD would have a falling out after its release, leading to them splitting up into solo careers with separate posses. Really nasty stuff if you believe the accusations, including armed robbery.

They did eventually get back together for another album five years later, but the magic was gone. PMD's solo stuff is definitely worth checking out.
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Old 08-16-18, 03:06 PM   #19
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

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I am huge, huge EPMD fan. I think Crossover may have been their highest-charting hit. Business Never Personal is a bittersweet album because Erick Sermon and PMD would have a falling out after its release, leading to them splitting up into solo careers with separate posses. Really nasty stuff if you believe the accusations, including armed robbery.

They did eventually get back together for another album five years later, but the magic was gone. PMD's solo stuff is definitely worth checking out.
I love PMD's solo stuff as well, particularly the first two albums. His solo debut was recently re-released with b-sides and so forth. A worthy purchase. I like a lot of Erick's solo stuff as well.

I didn't hate the reunion albums, but the first four are definitely far better.
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Old 08-16-18, 08:47 PM   #20
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Dr. Dre -- The Chronic

"The Chronic" is generally considered to be one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time and I agree wholeheartedly. A lot of hip-hop from this period sounds very "of its time" but "The Chronic" sounds as fresh today as it did when I first listened to it 25 years ago. I've listened to this album hundreds of times in my life but it's been years since I've checked back in and it's still incredible. You have Dr. Dre at the top of his game production and rapping wise. You have a coming out party for Snoop who for an artist without an album yet was the most anticipated rapper I can remember after his appearance on "Deep Cover" and then backed it up big time with his many verses on this album. It also features great guest appearances by fellow Death Row artists RBX and Lady of Rage who both don't get the mentions they deserve because of the runaway Snoop success. So yeah highly recommended if for some bizarre reason you've never listened to "The Chronic".



Favorite Tracks: "Fuck Wit Dre Day (And Everybody's Celebratin')", "Let Me Ride", "Nuthin' but a 'G' Thang", "Stranded on Death Row"

Letter Grade: A+
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Old 08-19-18, 01:55 PM   #21
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


EPMD -- Business Never Personal

Spoiler alert: I've never cared for EPMD. I don't mind PMD but I dislike Erick Sermon's rapping and am not a big fan of his production either. I went into "Business Never Personal" with an open mind since I'd only really heard the two singles from the album and came away pretty much where I started. It's an ok album just other then "Head Banger", "Crossover" and a good Das EFX guest spot the other tracks I found just serviceable. A lot of the lyrics are corny and repetitive (they use "like Michael Jackson" as a punchline on 4 different tracks). The Erick Sermon production is slightly better than I've heard on most of his guest producing on other albums but still not impressed.

I also didn't mind the backmasking of swear words as much in this one mainly because they rarely curse on the album. It's still weird in 2018 to hear them bleep out the word "shit" but keep all the homophobic slurs in.

Favorite Tracks: "Head Banger", "Crossover", "Cummin' at Cha (featuring Das EFX)"

Letter Grade: C

And JeremyM I listened to the other B-side you posted and didn't care for that much either.
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