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The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

Old 08-23-18, 02:58 PM
  #26  
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I liked The Chronic. Breakout star Snoop sounded great on those songs, including the intro. He was kind of copying the style of another artist on that album though. Which is why he only really sounded good on his first two solos. "Really doe." After that his voice and delivery sounded very fragile and delicate.

Dre's beats were great on this, in particular his sampling for "Nuthin' But a G Thang."

"Lil Ghetto Boy" was another great track.

I thought the beats and mixing was much more polished on Efil4zaggin, but that album didn't have as strong a first single as The Chronic.

I bought Ice Cube The Predator only for "It Was A Good Day." The other songs were a little too old school sounding for my taste at the time. I just skimmed through it right now after reading this thread, and it's better than I remember. But it's funny to hear Ice Cube talking all that g-talk when he was never ever gang related.
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Old 08-23-18, 06:47 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

Originally Posted by Lipid View Post
Honestly, I think you're going through these albums wayyyyyyyyyyy too fast.

Albums nowhere near as good as these I'll play for a week before I feel like I've got a good feeling of what's good or bad about it.

You're going through the golden of hip hop with albums that are really fucking good for the most part every couple days. I'd say take your time and slow things down, appreciate the music more and give it more listens before moving on or else you'll be missing out.
I appreciate the feedback and I tried to word this where it wouldn't sound snarky but can't find the way. That's the way you enjoy albums and it works for you but yeah that's not the way I listen to music. I've been listening to hip-hop for over 25 years now and I can tell within the first listen or two if I'm going enjoy something. I listened to all of the albums so far 4 or 5 times and that's far more than enough time for me to get my thoughts. I do a ton of driving for my job so I've got lots of listening time and the albums that I'm really digging I'm still going to listen to in the future. It's not like this is my only chance to hear them.

These are just my thoughts on the albums as I go I'm not looking at it like I'm a professional reviewer and this is the definitive take on each album. Obviously critically these are all highly regarded albums (or at least were back in 1992) so just like with any other form of entertainment where critics love something everyone is going to connect with it differently.
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Old 08-25-18, 09:59 AM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Fu-Schnickens -- F.U. Don't Take It Personal

I mostly remembered them for featuring Shaq on "What's Up Doc" (which is on their second and final album) and I had previously heard "La Schmoove" a bunch back in the early 90's. I also remember them having a similar rapping style to Das EFX.

So we get to the first album that I just flat out don't like. While yes they have a similar style to the Das EFX we hear on "Dead Serious" that album still sounds fresh and captivating where as the rapping on "F.U." has more of a reggae sound which doesn't hold up for me in the same way. "Movie Scene" which has some moments of technical greatness was cringeworthy to me in most other ways. "Heavenly Father" is unlistenable.

Favorite Tracks: "La Schmoove featuring Phife Dawg"

Letter Grade: D
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Old 09-02-18, 12:38 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Gang Starr -- Daily Operation

I consider Gang Starr to be one of my favorite rap groups but I hadn't started listening until "Hard to Earn". I had heard some of these songs before through the "Full Clip" Greatest Hits/Compilation album (which on a side note is probably my favorite Greatest Hits of all time. It's two discs of greatest hits, remixes, new tracks, and soundtrack songs. Highly recommended) but I don't think I had ever listened to this album all the way through which is too bad because it's a great album. DJ Premier is my second favorite producer of all time and he is incredible on "Hard to Earn". He kills it even on the few 30 second skits where I was hoping it was going to be a full song. I've heard a few naysayers call Guru's rapping boring but I don't agree. He's not trying to do anything fancy but he's got a solid flow and great subject matter. We also get the first appearance of Jeru the Damaja on "I'm the Man" which is a great guest spot.

Favorite Tracks: "Soliloquy of Chaos", "Ex Girl to Next Girl", "Take It Personal", "I'm the Man"

Letter Grade: A
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Old 09-05-18, 02:11 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

You are 100% right on Full Clip. It's the gold standard of what a greatest hits album should be.
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Old 09-13-18, 06:36 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Ice Cube -- The Predator

This is the first Ice Cube album that I've listened to all the way through (not counting Westside Connection) which is weird because I've always liked him but just was never one of my favorites. "The Predator" lives on Ice Cube's rapping and lyrics. The production is hit or miss but Ice Cube for the most part makes it not matter and takes command of the tracks with very little guest help. It was odd hearing this album version of "Check Yo Self" since the single version and the video are the remix with a different beat but after multiple listens I think I prefer this original version. Obviously "It Was a Good Day" is the quintessential Ice Cube song and even though I've heard it hundreds of times it still holds my attention. Their are a few goofier songs that don't hold up as well ("Dirty Mack" & "Gangsta's Fairytale 2") but overall I was really impressed with "The Predator" and will give the previous two albums a listen.

Favorite Tracks: "When Will They Shoot", "Now I Gotta Wet 'Cha", "It Was a Good Day", "Check Yo Self"

Letter Grade: B+
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Old 09-23-18, 10:23 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992


Kool G Rap & DJ Polo -- Live and Let Die

I had never listened to one of the Kool G Rap & DJ Polo albums before but I had heard Kool G Rap's first solo album "4,5,6" and he's guested on a bunch of stuff I've heard. "Live and Let Die" is the last of his DJ Polo collaborations and I can definitely see how it inspired the East Coast "mafioso" sound that would become prevalent in the next couple years by Nas, Jay-Z, Raekwon & Ghostface Killah, etc. It took me a few listens to fully connect to but Kool G Rap is definitely a talented lyricist and storyteller. I generally dislike "sex raps" but "Operation CB" stands out by being funny as hell. The production fits well with Kool G Rap's lyrics with "Letters" being my favorite track on both fronts. Overall a solid album and one I'll definitely add to the rotation.

Favorite Tracks: "Letters", "Operation CB", "Ill Street Blues", "Crime Pays"

Letter Grade: B
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Old 10-03-18, 02:02 PM
  #33  
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

That Kool G. Rap album is underrated. More of an underground classic than anything, as I don't remember any of its songs being radio-friendly. It definitely preceded much of the New York gangsta sound that would soon follow.
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Old 10-03-18, 07:15 PM
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Re: The Hip-Hop Albums of 1992

I'd again just encourage you to go back and revisit a lot of these albums when you're done. A majority you have underrated and overlooked. "Live and Let Die" has so much depth to it that to give it a B rating is out right confusing to me. For someone who appears to have an appreciation of the golden age of hip hop, I'm not sure how you're disappointed by this album and quite a few others.
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