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Album By Album: Yes

Old 10-22-13, 07:17 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Fragile - 1971



Released November 26, 1971 (UK)
January 4, 1972 (US)

1. Roundabout
2. Cans and Brahms
3. We Have Heaven
4. South Side of the Sky
5. Five Per Cent for Nothing
6. Long Distance Runaround
7. The Fish (Shindleria Praematurus)
8. Mood for a Day
9. Heart of the Sunrise

Personnel

*Jon Anderson - vocals
*Bill Bruford - drums, percussion
*Steve Howe - electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals
*Chris Squire - bass guitar, backing vocals
*Rick Wakeman - Hammond organ, piano RMI 368 Electra-Piano and Harpsichord, Mellotron, Moog synthesizer

Producer: Yes and Eddie Offord

From AlbumLinerNotes.com

A BRIGHTER SHADE OF GREEN

Yes began a period of perpetual change with The Yes Album; with Fragile they produced one of the masterpieces of progressive rock and became popular all over the world.

Two words describe much of Fragile’s music: jagged and luminescent – adjectives seldom found together. Even if the seeds of The Yes Album can be found in the band’s first two records (Yes and Time And A Word), and the seeds of Fragile can be found in The Yes Album, each represents a qualitative leap. Each reminds us that there was a period, in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, when a handful of rock acts went from strength to strength. Inspired by The Beatles, especially, and having their ears open to the whole world of music, these groups created new possibilities in rock, and some, of course, claimed to have left the genre altogether.

One of the most important of these groups was Yes, and with Fragile they began to realize their true potential. Most obviously, the addition of keyboardist Rick Wakeman (replacing Tony Kaye) made them a virtuoso collective. Though not credited, Wakeman contributed compositionally on “South Side Of The Sky” and “Heart Of The Sunrise”; his arrangement skills helped his fellow bandmembers pursue their idiosyncratic styles with ever greater freedom. The luminescence of this album derives in large part from five unique voices woven into a startling unity – a rare combination, itself expressive of the utopian spirit that inspired the music.

Outside of the U.K. (in North America, certainly), “Roundabout” was the first Yes experience for many people, and a fine introduction it was. Such a lovely song, especially in its full-length version. All of the Yes elements are here: invention, sweetness, and wistfulness, bright colors that are more Sibelius and Stravinsky than “pop,” and not without an edge – “Next to your deeper fears we stand/Surrounded by a million years.” And yes, that jaggedness is even more evident in “South Side Of The Sky” and “Heart Of The Sunrise.”

The primary source of this razor-sharp, sometimes stabbing sound was bassist Chris Squire. On the first three Yes albums, his influences were apparent enough – I would call it the “English school” of bass-guitar playing: Paul McCartney, Jack Bruce, John Entwistle. But a further leap in this style of up-front, contrapuntal playing that provided independent melodies and countermelodies, never down in the mix, had been percolating since Yes, and with Fragile all bonds were sundered. Melodically, harmonically, rhythmically, and in tonal range and colors, everything in the music had to take account of this leap in the role of what many regard (if they regard it at all) a “background” instrument.

Squire did something great for the bass and for rock music, but his partners also did something great, by being able to reconfigure their conceptions. Indeed, for those of us who heard Yes for the first time when “Roundabout” became a hit single in 1972, the gauntlet was thrown down: Listeners and players, open your ears! And get down to work! There was nothing about that song that had ever been heard on the radio – not in rock music, not in any music. Sure, all sorts of rock artists were fooling around with classical structures, with jazz-inspired improvisations, with synthesizers and Mellotron and lyncs that went quite beyond standard adolescent preoccupations. But Yes brought both artfulness and originality to these pursuits, and it can truly be said, for all five members, that no one else in rock music sounded like any of them. In “Roundabout,” perhaps the sounds most characteristic of this uniqueness are Squire’s bizarre “spring” (no bassline had ever sounded like that before), Bill Bruford’s snareless-snare “bonk,” and Jon Anderson’s singular voice, in the stratosphere of the male register and yet substantial, never strained or shrieking.

Luminescence, but, within that, darkness. Jagged, and yet somehow liquid. The three longer works – “Roundabout,” “South Side Of The Sky,” and “Heart Of The Sunrise” – exemplify these qualities with great depth and craft. The jaggedness on “South Side” originates more from Steve Howe’s blazing guitar runs than from Squire. It is a mark of the guitarist’s greatness that he can exercise control, even as his instrument sounds like it’s about to break free from him. Lyrically what’s strange about the song is its tragic tale, a polar expedition that ends in death by freezing. And even what might seem to be the “new-agey” release from the story line’s harshness, the passage “it seemed from all of eternity” (and the middle, wordless-voiced section, where the gates of heaven seem to open to the explorers) only deepens this tragic vision.

Speaking on the level of musical form, has there ever been better synthesis of jazz and Western classical elements than in “South Side’s” middle section, with Rick Wakeman’s rich piano and Bruford’s hypersyncopated drums? Some music is supposed to fall apart; that’s its idea. Yes has another idea; music that might fall apart – because it isn’t overly clear what holds it together – but somehow stays intact.

Yes has many "sleeper" songs, from “A Venture” (The Yes Album, 1971) to “To Be Over” (Relayer, 1974) to the more recent “Footprints” (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997), “Long Distance Runaround” is also a little gem, where a single idea unfolds perfectly. Fragile is built around four group and five solo works, of which Steve Howe’s “Mood For A Day” and Chris Squire’s “The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)” especially stand out. The former is a warm and delicious classical guitar work, that has since become part of the instrument’s basic repertoire. The latter track opened possibilities for “symphonies of bass guitars” (here echoing the title of Stravinsky’s work for wind instruments) that still need to be pursued.

The album closes with “Heart Of The Sunrise,” a study in dynamic contrasts that runs the gamut from “21st Century Schizoid Man”-inspired furious charging to dreamy pastoralism of the sort that can only come from feeling “lost in the city.” The song is a fine work in itself but it’s also an appropriate elaboration of the green language into which Yes entered ever more deeply – a language of English romanticism, of William Blake specially, against the background of and attempting to speak with the counterculture of the time. “Ten true summers” have passed three times over since we first heard this significant musical statement, but time has not diminished its power or necessity.

– Bill Martin

Bill Martin is the author of numerous books on music and political philosophy, including Music Of Yes: Structure And Vision In Progressive Rock (1996). His essay “Another Green Language: Still Yes After All These Years” appeared in Elektra/Rhino’s boxed set In A Word: Yes (1969-). He is a professor of philosophy at DePaul University, Chicago.

From Wikipedia:

It is somewhat unusual in that four of the tracks are performed by the entire band, while the other five showcase each of the group members.

Average rating on Amazon: 4.5 stars

Most helpful favorable review on Amazon:

This 1972 album showed Yes starting to move even further into the realm of progressive rock and features the classic lineup of Chris Squire (Rickenbacker bass, vocals); Rick Wakeman (Synthesizers, mellotron, Hammond organ, piano); Steve Howe (acoustic and electric guitars, vocals); Bill Bruford (drums; percussion); and Jon Anderson (lead vocals; guitar). I think it goes without saying that this lineup would produce some of the finest material released by Yes and was comprised of virtuosos. Certainly, all of this is very much present on Fragile, which I personally consider a showcase of staggering instrumental skill that is very warm and inviting somehow.

Because of contractual problems largely stemming from Rick Wakeman, Fragile consists of three band compositions and several smaller solo pieces. The three band compositions are excellent and include the alternately ripping and melodramatic Heart of the Sunrise (their response to 21st Century Schizoid Man (King Crimson, 1969); South Side of the Sky (about a failed mission to Antarctica I think); and the classic piece Roundabout. The solo pieces vary in quality and include the excellent Long Distance Runaround/The Fish (Jon wrote Long Distance Runaround, while The Fish is a Squire tour de force on the electric bass with percussion by Bill); Rick Wakeman's Cans and Brahms (extracts from Brahms's 4th Symphony in E Minor Third Movement performed on an arsenal of synthesizers) (Rick did not like Cans and Brahms at all); Steve Howe's excellent acoustic solo piece Mood for a Day; Bill Bruford's painfully short and unfinished sounding instrumental piece Five Percent for Nothing (a slam on the band manager apparently); and finally, Jon Anderson's We Have Heaven. As a bassist and avid worshipper of Squire, The Fish is hands down my favorite, although I generally like all of the solo pieces.

Overall, the music on Fragile is simply amazing and has all of the emotional punch (some might say melodrama) of tracks like Survival (1969); and Starship Trooper (1971), yet with the instrumental sophistication that would mark all of the 1970s work. Some very melodramatic moments can be heard on Heart of Sunrise, which is an absolutely super 10'34"; and South Side of the Sky is certainly not without drama. However, what really got me when I first listened to this album over 25 years ago (and to this very day) is the playing - these guys were in a class by themselves when it came to sheer virtuosity. Although the playing can get overwhelming at times, it is nicely leavened by softer, acoustic passages (on guitar and piano) and Jon Anderson's high pitched vocals. Along with some unbelievable vocal harmonies, this makes for one amazing listening experience.

With respect to the cover art (the first with Roger Dean), I feel that the painting of the tiny and "fragile" world on the front cover is very warm and intimate despite the planet being surrounded by the cold vacuum of outer space. Of course, on the back cover this peaceful world is depicted as breaking up - a very different scene from the front cover. The neat thing is that the breaking up of the planet was reiterated on the live Yessongs album. As I recall, I used to stare at the "large" cover art on the Fragile LP and it was very much a part of the listening experience. Then again, the cover art was very important for me on all of the Yes albums (even Drama (1980)) and is something I feel compelled to mention when I review any of their works.

The remastering on this album is incredible and (sort of) takes me back to the vinyl days. The booklet is excellent and features the original album artwork; a ton of liner notes; and photos of the band. Although the liner notes are pretty much old hat for the typical Yes freak (such as myself), they should prove informative to lots of folks. The excellent bonus track America was a very nice addition that was originally recorded for the 1972 Atlantic sampler LP "Age of Atlantic". Although I did not own this LP, I did own the compilation album "Yesterdays", which also featured America. The other bonus track includes an early rough mix of Roundabout that really does not add much.

All in all, an incredible Yes album that is very highly recommended along with all of their works from 1971 -1977.

Most helpful critical review from Amazon:

What happened here? Yes fires Tony Kaye for Rick Wakeman? Okay here are the differences w/ Kaye & Wakeman. Wakeman, who played the famous Mellotron track to David Bowie's 1969 hit "Space Oddity," has a backlog of keyboards in his possession. Wakeman at that time displayed an army of Minimoogs, a Mellotron Mark II, a Steinway Grand Piano, an RMI electric piano, and lastly, a massive Hammond Organ C3. All Tony Kaye had was just your Steinway Piano, a Minimoog, a Mellotron, & his Hammond Organ M102 (a spinet for which he did some major damage on, soundwise).
Wakeman & Kaye were both classically trained. Wakeman used all the instruments mentioned above on stage, Kaye only used his M102 organ w/ the Minimoog later. Wakeman had stage presence for which he moved from instrument to instrument. The only presence from Kaye was his no compromising roaring Hammond sound. Unlike "Yes," "Time & A Word." & "The Yes Album," "Fragile" barely has any keyboard work on the songs, if not no presence barely. There is no question Wakeman was more an experienced musician who had a backlog of insturments, but he lacks the presence, rawness & dexteritory of what Kaye had.... major balls behind his Hammond sound.

The major element that's forever lost in Yes is that distorted, angry Hammond sound that Kaye possessed. Wakeman doesn't even distort his Hammond C3 'cept for the song that made me buy this album & should've been at least 3 minutes long, "Five Percent For Nothing." This album is more the work of Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, Steve Howe, & of course Chris Squire. You can here them all over the place just about, except for Wakeman who barely contributes. Even though every member has a song of their own, Wakeman doing "Cans & Brahams" in general, you barely hear Rick in "Roundabout," though he does contributes very well in "The South Side of the Sky" & "Long Distance Runaround." If Kaye was in for this album, I think you hear more keyboards, mainly more loud, roaring Hammond Organ for this is what the album lacks. I get the impression that Wakeman's use was on stand-by.

What was the reason? Why was Tony Kaye, who did some severe damage behind a little Hammond M102 spinet & was all over the place, fired in order to bring in Rick Wakeman, who never distorted his massive Hammond C3 & is barely heard at all?
Old 10-22-13, 07:30 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

What is there to say about Fragile that hasn't already been said? This is an amazing album, although some of the interstitial stuff feels throwaway. But "Roundabout", "South Side of the Sky", and especially "Heart of the Sunrise" are absolute monster tracks. "Long Distance Runaround" is also a good, if more slight track. But man, the best stuff on here was some of the best music being made at that time by anyone. Yes, "Roundabout" has been played to death on the radio, but that doesn't detract from the quality of writing and performance.
Old 10-22-13, 07:54 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

"Tell the moon dogs, tell the march hare, tell the moon dogs, tell the march hare". I love that intro into South Side Of The Sky.

Also, the remaster of Fragile that came out a few years ago (Rhino?) may be the best remastered cd I have heard. It sounds great.
Old 10-23-13, 08:19 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by bunkaroo
I disagree. I don't see why music whose whole purpose was to progress and push boundaries has to be automatically labeled pretentious. If anything, I think it says more about the people who call it pretentious. Not every band has to play verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-solo-chorus out.
Of course they don't. Frank Zappa didn't and I wouldn't call his music pretentious and it's levels in complexity above anything Yes ever did. When you start doing Brahms pieces and surrounding yourself with 16 keyboards AND wear a CAPE, you are entering "pretentious" territory. Sorry.
Old 10-23-13, 10:10 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by CRM114
Of course they don't. Frank Zappa didn't and I wouldn't call his music pretentious and it's levels in complexity above anything Yes ever did. When you start doing Brahms pieces and surrounding yourself with 16 keyboards AND wear a CAPE, you are entering "pretentious" territory. Sorry.
Ahh so their looks and stage antics are what you have a problem with. Got it. Because the music taken on its own is not pretentious.
Old 10-23-13, 10:11 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Also, if any of you play an instrument, the Jammit app has all of Fragile and Close to the Edge available for all instruments. I use it all the time to play through the songs on bass. Very cool to be able to hear the isolated original recording tracks.
Old 10-23-13, 11:10 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by bunkaroo
Ahh so their looks and stage antics are what you have a problem with. Got it. Because the music taken on its own is not pretentious.
Didn't I mention Brahms?
Old 10-23-13, 11:24 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by CRM114
Didn't I mention Brahms?
Yes to which I replied "Because the music taken on its own is not pretentious".

So now any artist who plays parts of a classical piece on a record is pretentious?
Old 10-23-13, 01:44 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

OK, Yes isn't pretentious. Happy?
Old 10-23-13, 04:44 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

LOL - sorry for asking for legitimate reasons to call them that. How dare Wakeman try to be a showman with all those fancy keyboards and costumes?!? Who does he think he is, a performer?
Old 10-24-13, 11:03 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I missed The Yes Album. That was the first Yes album of note for me with Starship Trooper, Yours Is No Disgrace, and I've Seen All Good People being my first exposure to them. I was hooked on Yes from that moment forward although I haven't listened to their newest material. The latest LP I have by them is Big Generator which isn't by any means my favorite Yes. I think I prefer their older material beginning with The Yes Album.
Old 10-24-13, 03:32 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I think the ABWH record should get honorable mention later on this thread. I can't imagine it would have been much different if Squire had been involved, so in essence it is a "classic" Yes album of the late 80's.
Old 10-24-13, 03:35 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by bunkaroo
I think the ABWH record should get honorable mention later on this thread. I can't imagine it would have been much different if Squire had been involved, so in essence it is a "classic" Yes album of the late 80's.
It is better than most, if not all, of the post Big-Generator Yes stuff.
Old 10-25-13, 06:30 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by bunkaroo
I think the ABWH record should get honorable mention later on this thread. I can't imagine it would have been much different if Squire had been involved, so in essence it is a "classic" Yes album of the late 80's.
I had already planned on including ABWH, in between Big Generator and Onion...er, Union.
Old 10-26-13, 09:19 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Starting with this album, I can't remember another group that I not only couldn't wait to hear the music but couldn't wait to check out Roger Dean's artwork for the cover.
Old 10-27-13, 07:01 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I enjoyed Fragile, but not as much as I thought I would after really liking The Yes Album. Roundabout, Long Distance Runaround and Heart of the Sunrise are great. However, although I do like Sunrise, at times it feels as if the keyboard parts are more of an intrusion than a smoothly flowing part of the song.

South Side of the Sky is okay, but I don't like it as much as the aforementioned pieces, although I do find myself singing along with it. All in all, an okay album, but it seems to be lacking some cohesion.
Old 10-27-13, 07:16 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I feel like the thing that gets mentioned the least about Fragile is Bill Bruford's incredible drumming. I think Yes lost something undeniable when Bruford left.
Old 10-27-13, 07:22 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Originally Posted by Supermallet
I feel like the thing that gets mentioned the least about Fragile is Bill Bruford's incredible drumming. I think Yes lost something undeniable when Bruford left.
I would very much agree with that. Alan White is a very fine drummer, but Bruford is in a class all his own.
Old 10-27-13, 07:43 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I'm jumping ahead a bit here, but to me the differences between Alan White and Bill Bruford were made painfully clear on the first track from Tales From Topgraphic Oceans (which happened to be the first album the band released with White). If you listen to the drum fill after the intro of the first song, it sounds a little awkward, kind of like White wasn't sure exactly how to fill the space. Bruford would have played through that with ease.
Old 10-30-13, 05:06 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Close to the Edge - 1972



Released September 13, 1972

1. Close to the Edge
I. "The Solid Time of Change"
II. "Total Mass Retain"
III. "I Get Up, I Get Down"
IV. "Seasons of Man"
2. And You and I
I. "Cord of Life"
II. "Eclipse"
III. "The Preacher the Teacher"
IV. "The Apocalypse"
3. Siberian Khatru

Personnel
* Jon Anderson - vocals, production
* Steve Howe - guitars, vocals, production
* Chris Squire - bass, vocals, production
* Rick Wakeman - keyboards, production
* Bill Bruford - drums, percussion, production

Production: Yes and Eddie Offord

Close to the Edge is the fifth studio album from the English progressive rock band Yes, released in September 1972 on Atlantic Records. Produced after the commercial and critical success of Fragile (1971), it is the last featuring drummer Bill Bruford before his brief return in 1990.

Released three months into its supporting tour, the album was a commercial and critical success. It peaked at number number 3 in the United States and number 4 in the United Kingdom.

Close to the Edge also sees the whole band composing together. The slightly odd credits, with reference to "themes by", seems in part to have been a way of recognising Wakeman's contributions despite his contractual status meaning he was not allowed to compose for the band (which is why his solo on Fragile had ended up as an arrangement of a classical piece rather than the initially planned, original composition).

The spiritual influences introduced by Jon Anderson, are already evident in the music and lyrics of all three tracks on Close to the Edge. Renewal and repetition are other main themes; the title track starts and finishes with the same sound effects of running water and birds, and in "Siberian Khatru" there is the repetition of two-syllable words and phrases.

Producer Eddie Offord was back, which at this point was a given. According to Steve Howe: “At the time he was an integrated part of the recording experience, and then he’d become part of the life experience as well.” Eddie was instrumental in collaborating with the band to design the Yes sound. The fruition of this partnership resulted in an album of three pieces titled Close To The Edge, one of the crowning gems of Yes’ career and possibly of the progressive rock genre in general.

The lyrics for "And You and I" are more obscure. Yes expert Steven Sullivan has theorised a possible link to Isaac Asimov's "Foundation" series of science fiction novels, suggested by lines such as "As a foundation left to create the spiral aim". The opening of "The Preacher The Teacher"—"Sad preacher nailed upon the colour door of time"—may be a reference to Martin Luther. The final song's title, "Siberian Khatru", often leads people to ask what a khatru is. Although Anderson has sometimes pretended otherwise, it is simply a made-up word.

Recording for Close to the Edge took place at Advision Studios in London between April and June 1972. It marked the first time they wrote a song lasting an entire side of a vinyl record. Segments of ideas were recorded, mixed, edited, re-edited, re-recorded, debated and argued over at length in between travelling to give live performances; all the instruments and microphones would have to be set up again when the band got back in the studio. This was all back in the days when no computers, logic recall or mixdown automation existed in the studio world. Sound engineer Eddie Offord worked hard to make sure the result had a coherent sonic identity under the disruptive circumstances. In this piecemeal fashion, as time went by, the band built up the "Close To the Edge" track to make it more elaborate and grand.

CTTE featured another cover by artist Roger Dean, who created a Yes design markedly different from the one on Fragile. This graphic would become known as the “bubble logo” that is indelibly associated with the band to this day.

The album was released on 13 September 1972 on Atlantic Records during the band's supporting tour to promote the album. It peaked at number 3 in the US and number 4 in the UK.[1][2] "And You and I" was released as a shortened single in the US titled "And You and I Part II" that peaked at number 42 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.

In the Q & Mojo Classic Special Edition Pink Floyd & The Story of Prog Rock, the album came in at number 3 in its list of "40 Cosmic Rock Albums".[11] It is also listed in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. Progarchives.com voted it the greatest progressive album of all time in 2006. Guitar World ranked it number 67 in their (Reader's Choice) list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Albums of All Time. As of July 2013, it is ranked as one of the greatest albums of all time on Rate Your Music.

Bruford left the band on 19 July 1972 to join King Crimson. The recording process took longer than previous efforts, which grated on Bill Bruford. During the mixing of the album, Bill told his bandmates that he was leaving Yes to join King Crimson. Though he offered to tour, the band decided it was best to find a replacement drummer sooner rather than later. That someone was Alan White, a friend of Eddie’s who'd been a regular visitor to the Edge sessions. He was already friendly with the members and was interested in joining. Above all, he was a “name” drummer, making his mark with the likes of John Lennon and George Harrison. But despite Bill’s eagerness to move on, his contribution here is nothing short of spectacular, and he left the band on a high note.

As he played on Close to the Edge but left before the subsequent tour, Bruford was contractually obliged to share album royalties with White, and claims that Yes manager Brian Lane enforced a compensation payment of $10,000 from him. White had one full rehearsal with the band before the tour, which saw the band play a total of 95 concerts in the US, Canada, the UK, Japan and Australia.
Old 10-30-13, 05:41 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Close to the Edge is one of the crown jewels of progressive rock. "And You and I" is possibly my favorite Yes composition. Every member of the band is in absolute peak form, and there's not a single false note anywhere on this record.

However, when I listen to it I will sometimes skip Siberian Khatru in favor of the Yessongs version, which to me is the definitive performance of the song.
Old 10-30-13, 07:36 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

This was the peak of the Yes discography. Each album, starting with their debut, was better than the last, ending with CTTE. They would make outstanding music again, but not to the level of this album ("Going For The One" got mighty close). Probably in the top 5 of all-time prog rock music releases.
Old 10-31-13, 02:12 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

This was album was my first exposure to "classic" Yes and classic prog in general, other than being marginally familiar with "Roundabout" from classic radio.

Back in 1993 our band added a keyboardist who was huge into classic prog, especially Yes, ELP and Genesis. He lent me CttE on CD (I didn't even have a CD player yet), and he made sure to tell me to listen to it in one sitting and not "skip around". So that's what I did on my brother's stereo.

Up until that point I was not convinced I'd like any classic prog, thinking it would just be weak and uninteresting compared to my new found prog-metal love, Dream Theater. So yeah, I learned my lesson with this record, and started to acquire all of the Yes back catalog, as well as ELP, Genesis and a few others.

I love everything on it, but the acoustic beginning to "And You and I" may be my favorite acoustic work on any Yes record.
Old 11-08-13, 07:47 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

Close to the Edge was released as a 5.1 blu-ray last week.

The CD features a new stereo album mix by Steven Wilson, a new mix of America and an early mix of Close to the Edge.

Contains original artwork by Roger Dean who has overseen the artwork for this new edition.

The blu-ray features:

- 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio Surround (24bit/96khz) mixed from the original multi-channel recordings.
- the new stereo album mix in DTS-HD Master Audio (24bit/96khz).
- the original album mix and America in a DTS-HD Master Audio flat transfers from the original master tape source. (24bit/192khz)
- exclusive instrumental versions of all new mixes in DTS-HD Master Audio stereo (24bit/96khz).
- exclusive needle-drop of an original UK vinyl A1/B1 pressing transferred in 24bit/96khz audio.
- numerous audio extras appear in high-resolution stereo including single edits & studio run-throughs of album tracks
https://www.burningshed.com/store/pa...duct/340/5002/

(I ordered the 5.1 release of XTC's Nonesuch and this album back in August!)
Old 11-16-13, 10:13 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Yes

I haven't forgotten about this thread, just been busy the last couple of weeks.

I really ended up liking Close to the Edge more than I thought I would after not liking Fragile as much as I had hope to (not that it is bad, by any means).

However, I just feel that CTTE just works together as a whole in a more organic way than does Fragile.

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