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Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

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Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Old 07-09-14, 07:45 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

This is hilarious....
http://www.avclub.com/article/robin-...w-album-206713

Robin Thicke managed to sell 530 copies of his new album in the UK
By Sean O'Neal @seanoneal Jul 9, 2014 4:01 PM

Continuing a thorough public humiliation of the sort that would make for a catchy club anthem, Robin Thicke’s latest album, Paula—or as it’s soon to be known in some circles, “Exhibit A”—sold a mere 530 copies in its first week in the UK. While still enough to land at No. 200 on the British charts, presumably just behind Now That’s What I Call Tea Kettles!, it was a dismal debut that equals a mere 2 percent of what Blurred Lines sold in its first week there.

It followed an equally poor showing in America, where Paula sold just under 24,000 copies, barely squeaking into ninth place on the Billboard chart—a far cry from Blurred Lines’ No. 1 last year with 177,000 copies, and easily his worst showing since 2006’s The Evolution Of Robin Thicke, back when people were still making Growing Pains jokes. And it was accompanied by his selling just 550 copies in Canada, to very nice people who probably just felt sorry for that young man. And it comes after weeks of embarrassment for Thicke, which have included his recent Twitter Q&A disaster, an awkward BET Awards performance, an even more awkward video, and, of course, his writing and releasing of an album begging Paula Patton to take him back.

Still, to paraphrase what people used to say about the Velvet Underground, only 530 people may have bought Robin Thicke’s album, but all of them went on to make uncomfortable public pleas for reconciliation with their estranged wives.
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Old 07-09-14, 07:58 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Beautiful
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Old 07-09-14, 08:26 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

I think it was 550 in Canada, too.
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Old 07-20-14, 10:05 AM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Looks like Success wants less to do with him than Paula now.
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Old 07-23-14, 04:40 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

If you sell 500 copies of an album in the UK, it gets you on the charts?
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Old 07-29-14, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Supermallet View Post
Sins of the father, eh? You realize that Marvin Gaye was also part of that same family, right? Gaye had more talent in one fingernail than Thicke has in his entire body. If Thicke did plagiarize (and it sounds like he did to me, but that's for a judge to decide), then he should pay up, and be forced to buy a copy of "What's Going On" for every person who ever hears "Blurred Lines".
Fortunately, I don't have it and do own WGO, which is still an amazing album after all these years. Been to the museum too, amazing place. It sounds amazingly fresh even today, I can only imagine how it sounded in 1971. And the Funk Brothers are amazing.
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Old 09-08-14, 10:39 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Originally Posted by The Hollywood Reporter
Marvin Gaye's Children Use Audio Mashup to Prove 'Blurred Lines' Is Infringing
3:33 PM PDT 9/8/2014 by Eriq Gardner

On Monday, Marvin Gaye's children delivered a message to a California federal judge: Hearing is believing, so listen up.

Nona Gaye, Frankie Gaye and Marvin Gaye III have now filed their summary judgment papers in a lawsuit over "Blurred Lines" and are pointing the judge to recorded depositions and media interviews given by producer Pharrell Williams and singer Robin Thicke. The children have also submitted an audio mash-up that's intended to serve as "concrete musical illustrations of the substantial similarities" between last year's huge hit and Gaye's "Got to Give it Up."

Williams and Thicke filed their preemptive lawsuit in August 2013 seeking a declaration of noninfringement. This past July, the plaintiffs suggested in their own summary judgment papers that the Gayes "smelled money" when asserting a copyright infringement. The Gaye children indeed fired counterclaims in October 2013, but they want it noted who sued first.

According to the Gayes' bid for summary judgment, "Not only was it, therefore, Thicke and Williams who actually 'smelled money,' but it was they who then played the role of bully by suing Marvin Gaye's children when the Gaye children had the temerity to question why their father was not credited, or why 'Got to Give it Up' was not licensed, betting that the Gaye children would not have the will or resources to fight this battle. Thicke and Williams bet wrong, and they will now have to face the consequences of their misjudgment and their blatant copyright infringement."

The counterclaimants look to use statements from Williams and Thicke as admissions of guilt. Unfortunately, much of the deposition testimony has been sealed and redacted, but according to a declaration by the Gayes' lawyer, Richard Busch, Williams has stated that he envisioned himself as Marvin Gaye while making the song. Other media interviews are cited as well. In one, Thicke said that "Got to Give it Up" is one of his "favorite songs of all time" and that he went into the studio and said, "You know, Pharrell, I'd love to make something like this."

In theory, the Gaye children should have an easier time on their counterclaims than most plaintiffs in copyright litigation. Under what's known as the "inverse-ratio rule," a lower standard of proof of similarity is necessary when a high degree of "access" is shown. The Gaye children say that with or without the application of the inverse-ration rule, they should prevail.

To that end, they have produced for the judge's ears a mash-up — quite possibly the first time ever in a courtroom that a mash-up has been exploited to prove copyright infringement. In the recording, the vocal material of "Blurred Lines" plays over the instrumental of "Got to Give It Up," and vice versa. "This material sounds like a perfect, natural match because it blends sonically," says the summary judgment memorandum.

If that's not enough, the Gayes have two expert musicologists describing eight substantial similarities: "(1) the signature phrase in the main vocal melodies; (2) the hooks; (3) the hooks with backup vocals; (4) the core theme in 'Blurred Lines' and backup hook in 'Got to Give it Up'; (5) the backup hooks; (6) the bass melodies; (7) the keyboard parts; and (8) the unusual percussion choices."

As a preemptive strike, the plaintiffs dismissed these as "unprotectable, commonplace ideas," but the counterclaimants retort they are distinctive. Take the bass melodies, for instance. Both songs are said by the musicologists to have "two-measure phrases, which leave space in the middle of each of the bars, rhythms and points of harmonic arrival. This is not simply an element of a genre, as it is unusual to have bass lines in R&B that leave this much space in the middle of the bar."

The Gayes also reject the notion that other songs constitute prior art. War's "Low Rider" isn't "rhythmically similar," they say; Curtis Mayfield's "Superfly" isn't "consistent with the disco pattern in the songs here"; and the cowbell on Lipps Inc.'s "Funkytown" "plays continuous sixteenth notes rather than a Latin time keeping rhythm."

The full summary judgment papers are below — absent the mash-up, which we hope to provide soon — and also argue why Thicke's "Love After War" should be seen as an infringement of Gaye's "After the Dance." Finally, attorneys for the Gaye children attempt to convince U.S. District Judge John Kronstadt on the legal standards on which to weigh both songs when ruling.

"They filed papers insulting the family of the great Marvin Gaye," says Busch. "We responded with the facts and the law. Beyond that, everything we have to say is in our papers, including the expert reports and audio files submitted therewith."

The decision should be coming in the coming months. A jury trial has been scheduled for February 10, 2015.
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Old 09-11-14, 08:17 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

When the judge enters the room, will the bailiff say "everybody get up"?
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Old 09-15-14, 11:36 AM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Originally Posted by JTH182 View Post
When the judge enters the room, will the bailiff say "everybody get up"?


Originally Posted by The Hollywood Reporter
Robin Thicke Admits Drug Abuse, Lying to Media in Wild 'Blurred Lines' Deposition (Exclusive)
9:00 AM PDT 9/15/2014 by Eriq Gardner

"Blurred Lines," the pop hit that has quickly become one of the most fascinating and controversial songs of the young century, has now spawned even more to discuss thanks to the appearance of absolutely bizarre depositions given by the song's singer Robin Thicke and producer Pharrell Williams. The sworn testimony, revealed for the first time in a Los Angeles federal court on Monday, covers such subjects as authorship, song credit, drug abuse and media promotion, and with almost certainty, will change perceptions of a hit recording that was dubbed last year's Song of the Summer.

When "Blurred Lines" was released in March 2013, the catchy harmony became a cultural phenomenon, but since then, there's been substantial reassessment of what this song is all about. In some corners of the public, "Blurred Lines," with lyrics that include "Good girl, I know you want it," has been attacked as "kind of rapey." And in the past few months, Thicke has had to endure accusations of misogyny.

Then, there's the lawsuit filed by Thicke, Williams and song co-writer Clifford "T.I." Harris Jr. intended to protect "Blurred Lines" from claims of being a rip-off. They are facing off against the children of Marvin Gaye, who in a cross-complaint accuse the plaintiffs of making an unauthorized derivative of their father's 1977 classic "Got to Give It Up."

Last week, Gaye's family filed summary motion papers and also lodged an audio mash-up of the two songs in an effort to win the case. A good portion of the court documents were designated as confidential, but after some back-and-forth between the parties, a judge has ordered that transcripts of the celebrities' depositions shouldn't be sealed. The Hollywood Reporter has obtained copies of the sensational testimony.

Thicke and Williams gave their depositions this past April, and they were both incredibly hostile.

For example, when Richard Busch, attorney for the Gayes, attempted to play the mash-up for Thicke's ears, the singer begged him to stop. "It's so hard to listen to it," said Thicke, referencing a clash between major and minor chords. "It's like nails on a f—ing chalkboard... This is [like] Stanley Kubrick's movie Clockwork Orange. Where he has to sit there and watch... Mozart would be rolling in his grave right now."

The deposition turns even more strange once Thicke is forced to explain his many statements to the media about how Gaye has inspired him. For example, he once told GQ Magazine, "Pharrell and I were in the studio and I told him that one of my favorite songs of all time was Marvin Gaye's 'Got to Give It Up.' I was like, 'Damn, we should make something like that, something with that groove.' Then he started playing a little something and we literally wrote the song in about a half hour and recorded it."

But that's not actually what happened, Thicke now admits.


The singer says under oath that after writing and producing six albums himself, "I was jealous and I wanted some of the credit... I tried to take credit for it later because (Williams) wrote the whole thing pretty much by himself and I was envious of that."

In his deposition (read in full here), Thicke soon gets more specific:

"Q: Were you present during the creation of 'Blurred Lines'?

Thicke: I was present. Obviously, I sang it. I had to be there.

Q: When the rhythm track was being created, were you there with Pharrell?

Thicke: To be honest, that's the only part where — I was high on vicodin and alcohol when I showed up at the studio. So my recollection is when we made the song, I thought I wanted — I — I wanted to be more involved than I actually was by the time, nine months later, it became a huge hit and I wanted credit. So I started kind of convincing myself that I was a little more part of it than I was and I — because I didn't want him — I wanted some credit for this big hit. But the reality is, is that Pharrell had the beat and he wrote almost every single part of the song."

Thicke says he was just "lucky enough to be in the room" when Williams wrote the song. Afterwards, he gave interviews to outlets like Billboard where he repeated the false origin story surrounding "Blurred Lines" because he says he "thought it would help sell records." But he also states he hardly remembers his specific media comments because he "had a drug and alcohol problem for the year" and "didn't do a sober interview." In fact, when he appeared on Oprah Winfrey's show with his young son and talked about how weird it was to be in the midst of a legal battle with the family of a legendary soul singer who "inspires almost half of my music," Thicke admits he was drunk and taking Norco — "which is like two Vicodin in one pill," he says.

The singer addresses his honesty ("I told my wife the truth. That's why she left me.") and after saying he's been sober for many months, clarifies towards the end of the depsotion, that he's given up Vicodin but not alcohol.

Despite having limited input in the creation of "Blurred Lines," Thicke was given a co-writer credit, which he says entitles him to about 18-22 percent of publishing royalties. Why would Williams be so generous?

"This is what happens every day in our industry," said Williams during his own deposition (read in full here). "You know, people are made to look like they have much more authorship in the situation than they actually do. So that's where the embellishment comes in."

Williams' own testimony also got off to a belligerent start. At one point during the examination, Williams says he can read music, but then is shown a transcription of a song, and asked to identify notes and durations. "I'm not comfortable," Williams responds eight times as Busch presses to figure out whether he really can read music.

The producer is evasive in other ways. Asked whether Marvin Gaye has influenced him, Williams says , "He's an Aries. I respect him."

Williams says he didn't go into the studio with the intention of making anything sound like Gaye. He takes the attorneys through his creative process and why the session on "Blurred Lines" was a bit different.

"When I work with a person, I think about three things," he says. "I think about the energy that they're coming with, but this wasn't the case because (Thicke) wasn't there yet. But usually, I think about the energy and what they come in with, like what's on their mind, you know, argument with a girlfriend, e-mail with the husband, politics, state of the world. People walk in with vibes. They walk in with feelings. This was not one of those days."

The producer says he was in the "driver's seat" on this particular song, but does give Thicke some credit in a rather interesting section that seems to imply that white people are victims and beneficiaries of racial discrimination in the music business:

"Q: In your view, what holds 'Blurred Lines' together throughout the different sections?

Williams: What holds it together?

Q: Yeah.

Williams: Robin Thicke's voice.

Q: Does the bass line and the keyboard hold the songs together through the different sections?

A: No

Q: Why not?

A: Because it's the white man singing soulfully and we, unfortunately, in this country don't get enough — we don't get to hear that as often, so we get excited by it when the mainstream gives that a shot. But there's a lot of incredibly talented white folk with really soulful vocals, so when we're able to give them a shot — and when I say 'we,' I mean like as in the public gives them a shot to be heard, then you hear the Justin Timberlakes and you hear the Christina Aguileras and you hear, you know, all of these masterful voices that have just been given, you know, an opportunity to be heard because they're doing something different."


Williams then adds that if he had sang the song, "It wouldn't be what it was — what it is today."

He admits, though, it's his song. Asked whose creation were the "Blurred Lines" words, he answers, "Mine."

How this all fits into the ongoing lawsuit is an intriguing question in and of itself.

In attempting to keep the depositions private, Howard King and Seth Miller — attorneys for Thicke and Williams — argued that they were hardly relevant and merely intended to "distract attention from the real issues and to embarrass, harass, and annoy Plaintiffs." They begged the judge to take note of the fact that celebrity depositions can be subject of "untoward media exploitation and public scrutiny," and instructed the judge, "Google 'Justin Bieber deposition.'" (The attorneys were at least successful in getting the judge to keep private the videotaped version of the depositions.)

The transcripts of the depositions don't necessarily refute the plaintiffs' contention in their own summary judgment motion that "Blurred Lines" and "Got to Give It Up" are not substantially similar for purposes of a copyright analysis, but on the road to a trial that is currently scheduled for February 10, 2015, the Gayes believe they have ammunition to destroy the plaintiffs' credibility and honor.

"Thicke, for his part, now claims he made all of his statements while drunk or on drugs, none of them true, and he mentioned Marvin Gaye only to sell records," states the counter-claimants' court papers. "He also actually testified that he is not an honest person. This complete contempt for the judicial system, and their obligations to tell the truth, can best be summed up by Thicke’s ultimate admission, while under oath, that he '[does not] give a f--k' about this litigation."
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Old 09-15-14, 03:41 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

And of course the song was nominated for a Grammy, shocking that it didn't win.
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Old 09-15-14, 04:03 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Bad news for Robin. I had always assumed Paula left because he wrote a shitty, annoying song. If that were actually the case, there would be a chance of reconciliation now.
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Old 09-15-14, 07:21 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

On the plus side, as long as Pharrell doesn't work with Thicke again, we'll likely never heard another one of his songs for the rest of our lives.
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Old 09-16-14, 02:01 AM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Hey, drinking is fun!

The whole Norco thing is too dangerous for my blood - that shit leads to instant liver failure. I ain't going out like that!
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Old 10-30-14, 02:06 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Judge Rejects Bid of Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams to Win 'Blurred Lines' Lawsuit
11:42 AM PDT 10/30/2014 by Eriq Gardner

In a ruling that could set up one of the biggest trials ever over alleged song theft, U.S. District Judge John Kronstadt on Thursday denied Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke's motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit that explores the origins of the blockbuster hit, "Blurred Lines."

The two musicians filed a lawsuit in September 2014 after receiving threats from Marvin Gaye's family, who contend the song is a knock-off of "Got to Give It Up." The lawsuit sought declaratory relief that "Blurred Lines" was non-infringing, painting the defendant as attempting to claim ownership of an entire genre. That led to a countersuit where the Gaye camp asserted that the song was indeed infringing, that Thicke had a "Marvin Gaye fixation," and that he had also stolen a second song, "Love After War" from Gaye's "After the Dance."

Both sides trotted out musicologists and mash-ups, debated the nuances of copyright law and even addressed Thicke's wild deposition comments admitting drug abuse and lying to the media.

The end result is Judge Kronstadt's conclusion that the case shouldn't end now.

The Gaye family, he writes, "have made a sufficient showing that elements of 'Blurred Lines' may be substantially similar to protected, original elements of 'Got to Give It Up.' Defendants have identified these with particularity for purposes of analytic dissection."

Specifically, the judge points to genuine issues of material fact existing as to the substantial similarity of signature phrases, hooks, bass lines, keyboard chords, harmonic structures and vocal melodies of the two songs. The judge also writes that the Gaye family has offered sufficient evidence to create triable issues about whether their 11-note signature phrase, four-note hook, four-bar bass line, 16-bar harmonic structure and four-note vocal melody are protectable expressions.

The judge also refuses to allow Williams and Thicke to win at this juncture on claims tied to "Love After War."

The ruling isn't a complete loss for the singer and his producer.

There was much controversy between the two sides as to whether Gaye's copyrights are limited to sheet music compositions or whether they extend to features heard on the "Got to Give It Up" sound recording. For the purposes of the analysis, the judge looks to the 1909 Copyright Act, which would have given the Gaye family the right to include more than just the sheet music if the work was published with proper notices or part of necessary deposits at the Copyright Office. The judge concludes that the Gaye family hasn't sufficiently shown it did either, and thus, they "have failed to produce evidence that creates a genuine issue as to whether the copyrights in 'Got to Give It Up' and 'After the Dance' encompass material other than that reflected in the lead sheets deposited with the Copyright Office."

As a result, the analysis of whether Thicke's "Blurred Lines" is substantially similar to Gaye's "Got to Give It Up" won't examine such things as the congruence of percussive choices or backup vocals.

Judge Kronstadt also addresses Thicke's deposition comments, where he admitted that he had lied to the media about going into the studio with Marvin Gaye in mind and that in fact he didn't have much to do with the creation of "Blurred Lines." This came up because copyright law has a concept called the "inverse-ratio rule" where lots of access to a song necessitates less proof of similarity. The judge writes that "Thicke’s inconsistent statements do not constitute direct evidence of copying," though that hardly helps him because Marvin Gaye is nearly universally known and Williams and Thicke "concede access," basically meaning they've at least heard Gaye's 1977 hit.

A trial is currently scheduled for February 10, 2015.
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Old 10-31-14, 08:39 AM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

I liked the Jimmy fallon version of this
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Old 02-24-15, 06:16 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

'Blurred Lines' Trial Opens With Jurors Discussing Racy Music Video
2:16 PM PST 2/24/2015 by Austin Siegemund-Broka

On Tuesday, Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams were on hand for the start of the proceeding examining whether "Blurred Lines," one of the biggest songs of the century, was improperly derived from Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give It Up."

Thicke, Williams and Clifford Harris Jr., better known by his stage name T.I. sued Gaye's family in 2013 to get a declaration that their multiplatinum hit isn't a rip-off of the late soul legend's copyright. In counterclaims, the singer's children Frankie and Nona Gaye accused the musicians not only of infringing on "Got To Give It Up," but also of turning Gaye's "After the Dance" into Thicke's "Love After War."

Thicke — who did nothing but smile today — and Williams are scheduled to testify in judge John Kronstadt's courtroom at the trial, which is anticipated to take eight days. So will T.I. and Thicke's ex-wife Paula Patton, featured on "Love After War." Frankie, Nona and several other Gaye family members were present in court as well.

The jury selection process kicked off the festivities and included an unusual question: Who was offended by the music video for "Blurred Lines," which features bare-chested, nearly nude women? Some responded they couldn't remain impartial.

"I have two young daughters," said one prospective juror, a teacher, who told the judge the video would affect her judgment. "I'm trying to raise them to be empowered and not use their sexuality to sell things," she said before being dismissed.

Other questions in the selection process included whether the prospective jurors played a musical instrument or could read music, whether they knew Williams' work and liked it — Thicke's repertoire wasn't addressed — and whether they could judge celebrities fairly.

"I have to say, I do listen to a lot of oldies. I was weaned on it," volunteered one prospective juror, a retired woman who was later dismissed, when asked if she was familiar with Gaye's work. "His music was the backdrop when I was in college," responded another. When the judge asked a college student how he knew Williams' work, the juror responded, "He's everywhere."

Following the selection of the jury, the court took a recess at 12:30 p.m. It will resume at 2 p.m.
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Old 03-03-15, 07:36 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

'Blurred Lines' Trial Reveals How Much Money Robin Thicke's Song Made
10:54 AM PST 3/3/2015 by Eriq Gardner, Austin Siegemund-Broka

The second week of trial has damages experts opening up about closely guarded financial secrets.

As the Blurred Lines trial resumed, jurors got an inside peek at the financial success of the song credited to Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams and T.I.

Both sides agree with an accounting statement that attributes $16,675,690 in profits for "Blurred Lines," which was the biggest hit of 2013. According to testimony, $5,658,214 went to Thicke, $5,153,457 was given to Williams and $704,774 came to T.I. The record companies (Interscope, UMG Distribution and Star Trak) took home the rest, with an executive at Universal Music testifying that overhead costs on the creation of "Blurred Lines" accounted for $6.9 million.

Few things are more closely guarded in the song business than financial profitability, and these types of details usually only leak out in accounting disputes that make it to trial. Here, the numbers are revealed as part of a copyright case where the family of Marvin Gaye asserts entitlement to a big chunk of money from "Blurred Lines" because it's alleged to be a copyright infringement of "Got to Give It Up." As a result, such information as the $4.3 million that Williams got in publishing royalties and $860,000 he got in producer royalties has been disclosed.

Gaye's family isn't stopping at demanding money from sales of the song. The singer's children Frankie and Nona Gaye are also targeting touring money, which, according to testimony, was about $11 million attributable to the success of "Blurred Lines." Much of this information comes from Creative Artists Agency, which was served with a subpoena over Thicke's income. To be awarded money on the touring front, the Gayes will likely have to establish a causal nexus between the infringement and the touring revenues.

Besides seeking profits, the Gayes are additionally seeking actual damages, or an amount of money to compensate the Gayes for a reduction of the fair market value of the worth of licensing "Got to Give It Up." Testimony on that front will be coming soon. But an accountant for the Gayes testified that the total publishing revenue for "Blurred Lines" is a little over $8 million, and that the Gayes would have negotiated for a 50 percent cut.

However, accounting expert Nancie Stern testified that the licensing fees would have gone up to 75 to 100 percent if there was no agreement before the release of the song. "If you [license] before you release, you can negotiate," she testified. "After the fact, it becomes an infringement and you lose your negotiating power. There are many different variables that go into how that will turn out."

Finally, there's also a second song in contention at trial — Thicke's "Love After War," alleged to have misappropriated Gaye's "After The Dance." That song, according to more testimony from Gaye's other financial expert, Gary Cohen, brought home $895,374 in profits.

During opening arguments, Richard Busch, the attorney representing the Gayes, tallied the alleged damages at approximately $40 million.
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Old 03-03-15, 07:47 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

That's nuts.
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Old 03-03-15, 07:58 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

But but but piracy!
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Old 03-04-15, 07:51 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Crazy amount of money to tinker around with some equipment and write a song.
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Old 03-04-15, 08:23 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Crazy amount of money to tinker around with some equipment and steal a song.
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Old 03-04-15, 08:31 PM
  #97  
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

Cha-ching$$$$$$$$$
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Old 03-10-15, 04:41 PM
  #98  
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

‘Blurred Lines’ Verdict: Pharrell, Robin Thicke Ordered to Pay $7.3 Million to Marvin Gaye Family
March 10, 2015 | 02:32PM PT Alex Stedman

The jury has reached a verdict in the “Blurred Lines” case against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams, ordering them to pay $7.3 million to the family of Marvin Gaye for copyright infringement.

In the trial, Marvin Gaye’s family argued that 2013’s “Blurred Lines” copied their father’s 1977 song “Got to Give Up,” and sued Thicke, Williams and rapper T.I.

The musicians have denied stealing any of Gaye’s music. “Blurred Lines” was a huge hit in 2013 and, by many measures, was the top song of the year.

Both Thicke and Williams appeared in court to defend their case, with much of the trial featuring comparisons to both songs. Listening to the juxtaposed bass lines of the two songs in question, Williams even admitted the similarities, saying “It sounds like you’re playing the same thing.”

Still, while testifying last week, Williams said the two songs share “feel — not infringement.”

The eight-person jury closed its full day of closed-door deliberations on Friday, with court resuming on Tuesday.
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Old 03-10-15, 05:02 PM
  #99  
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

hey hey hey!
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Old 03-10-15, 07:22 PM
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Re: Robin Thicke Blurred Lines Music Video with T.I. & Pharrell

I guess Thicke and company gotta give it up now. Jury says there ain't nothing like the real thing.
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