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Album By Album: Genesis

Old 11-28-10, 03:09 PM
  #76  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Genesis Live



Released July 27, 1973

1. Watcher of the Skies
2. Get'em Out By Friday
3. The Return of the Giant Hogweed
4. The Musical Box
5. The Knife

Personnel

Peter Gabriel vocals, flute, bass drum, tambourine
Steve Hackett lead guitar
Tony Banks Hammond organ, Mellotron, Hohner pianet, 12-string guitar, backing vocals
Mike Rutherford bass, bass pedals, 12-string guitar, backing vocals
Phil Collins drums, backing vocals

Production

Producer - John Burns and Genesis
Mastered by Zal Schreiber

Genesis Live is the first live album released by rock group Genesis in 1973. It was the band's first top 10 hit in the UK reaching #9 and remaining on the charts for 10 weeks.

Originally, Genesis had no plans to release a live album at the time, but were persuaded by their label, Charisma Records, to release Genesis Live as a budget-priced title to mark time while the band recorded the album Selling England by the Pound in mid-1973. The result became a boon for Genesis fans, as this album represented the only legitimately released concert recording of the band with Peter Gabriel on vocals, until the 1998 release of Genesis Archive 1967-75.

The tracks on the album were recorded at De Montfort Hall, Leicester, England, on February 25, 1973 (1973-02-25) except for "Return of the Giant Hogweed" recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England on the previous day, when the band was touring in support of their Foxtrot album. [1] These recordings were originally made by the US radio show King Biscuit Flower Hour, although they were never broadcast.

A remastered version was released on CD in 1994 by Virgin in Europe and Atlantic in the U.S. and Canada.

Genesis never officially released a live recording of "Supper's Ready" from the Foxtrot tour, but a recording of the song from the following year's tour was released on 1998's 4-CD boxed set, Genesis Archive 1967-75. However, Gabriel re-recorded some of his vocals before allowing release.

A handful of early radio promotional double-LP test pressings by Philips/ Phonogram Int. B.V. (actually PolyGram at the time) were created which included a 23-minute version of "Supper's Ready" from the Leicester show. This pressing's running order was 1-3-5-"Supper's Ready"-2-6 and included between-song patter by Gabriel. Whether this test pressing was intended to be released as the actual album is unknown. In the event, "Supper's Ready" was not included. However, the cover art is of a photograph taken during a live performance of "Supper's Ready", with Gabriel donning the "Magog" mask.
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Old 11-28-10, 03:35 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Genesis performing five long form compositions live and proving they could rock as hard as any band in 1973. The performances of The Knife and The Musical Box are particularly stunning. One of the better live albums I own.
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Old 11-28-10, 04:49 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I love this one. I wish they had a full-length show from this era that they could/would release.
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Old 11-28-10, 09:42 PM
  #79  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I remember being like 15 years old and seeing this in a cut out bin and being creeped out by the picture on the front and the story that Gabriel wrote on the back:

4:30 p.m. The tube train draws to a halt. There is no station in sight.Anxious glances dart around amongst the passengers as they acknowledge each other's presence for the first time.
At the end of the train, a young lady in a green trouser suit stands up in the centre of the carriage and preceeds to unbutton her jacket, which she removes and drops to the dirty wooden floor. She also takes off her shoes, her trousers, her blouse, her brassiere, her tights and her floral panties, dropping them all in a neat pile. This leaves her totally naked. She then moves her hands across her thighs and begins to fiddle around in between her legs. Eventually, she catches hold of something cold and metallic and very slowly, she starts to unzip her body; working in a straight line up the stomach, between the breasts, up the neck, taking it right on through the centre of her face to her forehead. Her fingers probe up and down the resulting slit finally coming to rest on either side of her navel. She pauses for a moment, before meticulously working her flesh apart. Slipping her right hand into the open gash, she pushes up through her throat, latching on to some buried solid at the top of her spine. With tremendous effort, she loosens and pulls out a thin, shimmering, golden rod. Her fingers release their grip and her crumbled body, neatly sliced, slithers down the liquid surface of the rod to the floor.

SPLAT!

The rod remains hovering just off the ground. A flagpole without flag.
The other passengers have been totally silent, but at the sound of the body dropping on the floor a large middle-aged lady. wearing a pink dress and matching poodle stands up and shouts, "STOP THIS, ITS DISGUSTING!"
The golden rod disppeared
the green trouser-suit was left on a hanger. with a dry-cleaning ticket pinned to the left arm. On the ticket was written-
NAME...............
ADDRESS............
...................
...................
...................


I didn't even hear the album until probably 5 or 6 years later.
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Old 11-29-10, 02:16 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

"Live" is easily my most favorite from the Gabriel era. I've always been partial to live albums regardless- I think it's the energy they have compared to the album versions usually. I agree, it'd be nice if they could expand upon this album a bit. "The Knife" is the perfect closer for this.. such a wonderful version! I was a bit let down by the album version after this (I had "Live" before "Trespass").
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Old 11-29-10, 04:44 PM
  #81  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Again, I'm getting ahead of myself, but I saw them perform several songs at the end of The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway concert in Cleveland Ohio including Watcher Of The Skies, complete with the costume, blue lighting, the beginning of the song slowly builds until Gabriel flies down to center stage replete with wings, grabs up the mike and starts singing. The entire show was an awesome (and I don't use that word lightly) performance. Peter Gabriel added the magic to Genesis, and took it with him when he left.

The Live album is an excellent example of what Genesis was capable of. -kd5-
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Old 11-29-10, 05:10 PM
  #82  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I'm generally not a fan of live albums. Sure, there are some masterworks. But a lot of times they seem like a cheap way for bands to fulfill a recording contract, and come across like "Greatest Hits" collections, but with inferior sound.

Genesis is one of the exceptions for me. The "rock" side of the band comes across more in the live versions. And I like how they feel free to experiment with arrangements that differ from the studio versions. Maybe not so much on this one, but certainly more on later live albums (and a lot of times I end up preferring the live arrangements).

Originally Posted by cungar View Post
I remember being like 15 years old and seeing this in a cut out bin and being creeped out by the picture on the front and the story that Gabriel wrote on the back:

4:30 p.m. The tube train draws to a halt. There is no station in sight.Anxious glances dart around amongst the passengers as they acknowledge each other's presence for the first time.
At the end of the train, a young lady in a green trouser suit stands up in the centre of the carriage and preceeds to unbutton her jacket, which she removes and drops to the dirty wooden floor. She also takes off her shoes, her trousers, her blouse, her brassiere, her tights and her floral panties, dropping them all in a neat pile. This leaves her totally naked. She then moves her hands across her thighs and begins to fiddle around in between her legs. Eventually, she catches hold of something cold and metallic and very slowly, she starts to unzip her body; working in a straight line up the stomach, between the breasts, up the neck, taking it right on through the centre of her face to her forehead. Her fingers probe up and down the resulting slit finally coming to rest on either side of her navel. She pauses for a moment, before meticulously working her flesh apart. Slipping her right hand into the open gash, she pushes up through her throat, latching on to some buried solid at the top of her spine. With tremendous effort, she loosens and pulls out a thin, shimmering, golden rod. Her fingers release their grip and her crumbled body, neatly sliced, slithers down the liquid surface of the rod to the floor.

SPLAT!

The rod remains hovering just off the ground. A flagpole without flag.
The other passengers have been totally silent, but at the sound of the body dropping on the floor a large middle-aged lady. wearing a pink dress and matching poodle stands up and shouts, "STOP THIS, ITS DISGUSTING!"
The golden rod disppeared
the green trouser-suit was left on a hanger. with a dry-cleaning ticket pinned to the left arm. On the ticket was written-
NAME...............
ADDRESS............
...................
...................
...................


I didn't even hear the album until probably 5 or 6 years later.
Thanks for that! I think if I had seen that picture and read that story at a young age, I'd be creeped out by Peter Gabriel too.

Originally Posted by cdollaz View Post
I wish they had a full-length show from this era that they could/would release.
Seconded! The Peter Gabriel-led Genesis had such a unique live presence. And - at least on the surface - most of that is from Gabriel himself. He throws himself dramatically into every song, and the costumes/lighting really brings out the stories of the songs. I like how he uses the instrumental sections of songs to dash backstage for costume and makeup changes. It's kind of funny to see Gabriel throw himself about the stage, while the rest of the band barely moves (and most of them stay sitting). This kind of outlandish stage production can easily veer into laughably bad "Spinal Tap" territory. But these guys manage to pull it off. Here are some youtube live versions of these songs from about this time. For "The Musical Box", check a post a couple of pages back.

More convincing rock singer/alien - Bowie or Gabriel?




Missing the beginning, but this was the best I could find. I like Gabriel's use of the mike stand as a weapon.
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Old 11-29-10, 05:18 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

FYI The story on the back of Live was what convinced William Friedkin (Director of the Exorcist) to contact Gabriel in hopes of developing film projects (that never materialized) and was one of the factors in Gabriel leaving Genesis.
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Old 11-30-10, 10:00 AM
  #84  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I've listened to this a few times now. I think it is good as a live album, but like others, I wish it had been longer.

For me, though, I still prefer Phil Collins' voice to Gabriel's on the older material. Does this make me a heretic?
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Old 12-01-10, 09:31 AM
  #85  
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Selling England By the Pound



Released October 12, 1973

1. Dancing With the Moonlit Knight
2. I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)
3. Firth of Fifth
4. More Fool Me
5. The Battle of Epping Forest
6. After the Ordeal
7. The Cinema Show
8. Aisle of Plenty

Personnel

Peter Gabriel lead vocals, flute, oboe, percussion
Phil Collins drums, percussion, backing vocals, lead vocals on "More Fool Me"
Tony Banks backing vocals, piano, keyboards, acoustic guitar on "The Cinema Show"
Steve Hackett Guitar, backing vocals on "I Know What I Like""[citation needed]
Mike Rutherford bass guitar, bass pedals, rhythm guitar, cello on "Dancing With The Moonlight Knight", electric sitar

Production

Producer: Genesis and John Burns

Selling England by the Pound is the fifth studio album by the progressive rock band Genesis and was recorded and released in 1973. It followed Foxtrot and was the band's commercial peak so far hitting #3 in the UK where it remained on the charts for 21 weeks. The album went gold in the US in 1990. It was also a major breakthrough in terms of critical reception.

The album cover is a painting by Betty Swanwick called The Dream. The original painting did not feature a lawn mower; the band had Swanwick add it later as an allusion to the song "I Know What I Like."

Retaining the pastoral yearning for ancient or medieval England as its primary thematic material, the album focuses on traces of this past in the present. Songs about England's mythological past ("Dancing With the Moonlit Knight") co-exist with sketches of contemporary lawnmowers ("I Know What I Like"), and the centrepiece of the second side, the epic "Cinema Show", has two lovers serve as reincarnations of ancient Greek figures, drawing on elements from "The Fire Sermon", the 3rd section from T. S. Eliot's long poem The Waste Land.

The musical performances are much more polished and tight than on the preceding LPs. Musical diversions are more often unified into the general song structure. In particular, Steve Hackett's guitar solos in "Firth of Fifth" show his unique voice on guitar at its best, while the song opens with a highly structured classically inspired piano-instrumental by Banks. As with previous efforts, unusual time signatures and shifts in key and pace continue as key structural devices, and while these formal aspects are no less present on this album, they often serve to support the general melodies of the songs, rather than dominate them. In fact, this album in general shows a focus on melody as the structural unifying force of the songs, as opposed to having the music centre around Gabriel's vocal and lyrical forays.

The album contains many pieces that would become central to Genesis' live act for years to come, particularly "Firth of Fifth" and "Cinema Show," both of which use short lyrical sketches to frame extended instrumental compositions. Along with "The Battle of Epping Forest," a song based upon a gangland brawl yet full of references to the squabbles for the English countryside of the far removed past, songs such as "Firth of Fifth" and "The Cinema Show" make prominent use of Tony's recently acquired ARP Pro Soloist, marking the first use of a synthesiser on any Genesis recording. "Firth of Fifth" has continued to be included in Genesis live sets, but Tony Banks' piano introduction has not been included in a performance since 1974, in a Drury Lane Theatre concert, when Banks misplayed and Phil Collins covered by starting the song from after the intro. Compositionally, "The Cinema Show" provides the climax for the album's second side, starting off with Rutherford and Hackett's trademark intertwining acoustic guitars, providing the backdrop for mythological lyrics, and leading to a long-form synthesiser solo by Banks in which Gabriel and Hackett played no part; during live performances, they both left the stage for this section. This anthemic solo section would later form the melodic centrepiece of the extended instrumentals at the core of the band's 'In The Cage' Medley (a combination of song excerpts that Genesis would perform live years after it had stopped performing other songs from the '70s), demonstrating Banks' increasing role as one of the band's primary songwriters.

Ending with the reprise of motifs from the start of the album, "Aisle of Plenty" mournfully brings the album full circle to where it began - nostalgia for old England. The album also produced the shorter track "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)", which became Genesis' first single to receive any sort of chart action, hitting #21 in the UK in April 1974.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:21 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Selling England by the Pound is my favorite Genesis album. It includes two of my top 5 Genesis songs: Firth of Fifth and Cinema Show. And Dancing with the Moonlit Knight is another of my favorites. I love the quirky English charm of this album. How it exposes the dark underside of English life in the 70's.

Cinema Show gives me the chills to this day. Especially the "Take a little trip back with Father Tiresius" part. And the instrumental jam pretty much defines everything I loved about early Genesis. One of Tony Banks coolest keyboard parts.

Firth of Fifth is of course famous for Steve Hackett's most celebrated solo and lyrically I have no idea what it means but it's still a great song.

"I know what I like" is pretty good but I'm kind of sick of it. It's one of the few early Genesis songs I think Phil Collins improved on in concert and made his own.

The Battle of Epping Forest in interesting if a little busy. I like it if I'm in the mood for really proggy stuff.

Although the album kind of peters out in the end it's still my favorite genesis album.

Amazing in 5.1 surround.
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Old 12-01-10, 11:39 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Okay, this is point in time where Genesis really came into their own. "Firth of Fifth" and "Cinema Show" are masterpieces, and this particular style of music would only be touched upon once more in the band's future (Wind & Wuthering). The entire album flows so well from beginning to end, and with such exuberance and beauty, that you think the band could never possibly top this effort (which of course they did on their next release). The only slight problem I have with this album is "The Battle Of Epping Forest". Gabriel's vocals do not really mesh up with the how the music is moving thru the song. He is all over the scale with his delivery, while the music is flowing fairly even. I had once read a quote from Tony Banks, saying that the song would have worked much better as an instrumental...and I'd have to agree with his assessment. Still, the song is not that distracting that I've ever skip over it. I'd rate this release four and half stars out of a possible five.
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Old 12-01-10, 03:10 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

This was the album that got me into Peter Gabriel-era Genesis. "Dancing With The Moonlit Knight" is one of the best opening tracks I've ever heard (by any band), beginning with Gabriel's piercing vocals, and then slowly building up to a rock barrage that leaves you breathless. One of the best tracks the band ever recorded.

The album stumbles slightly with "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)," which almost sounds like prog-Genesis making a stab at the pop charts. It's not bad, but the melody is weaker than the other tracks here.

Things pick back up with "Firth of Fifth," a piano-led tune that feels epic in scope and lyrics. "More Fool Me" is my least favorite track on the album, with Collins' vocals showing none of the confidence that they would in later years.

"The Battle of Epping Forest" is one of my favorite tracks on the album. A wild, freewheeling, meandering song, it's full of witty wordplay and you never quite know where it's going next.

"After The Ordeal" is the perfect follow-up, a mellower instrumental that allows you to catch your breath in preparation for "The Cinema Show," the album's final long track. More subdued than the rest of the album, "The Cinema Show" ends the album in style, making it feel like a journey from beginning to end. And then there's the nonsense "Aisle of Plenty," which shows the band still has a sense of humor.

While the two shorter songs are less than great, Selling England By The Pound is still one of Genesis' strongest albums, only topped by Foxtrot and The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway.
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Old 12-01-10, 07:21 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I would have to say that this is my favorite of the Gabriel albums. (I have listened to Lamb). I heard Ray Wilson singing the beginning of Dancing With the Moonlit Knight on a bootleg of the Calling All Stations tour and I was hooked. I checked the CD out of the library so I could hear the original song. This is the first Gabriel album where I don't have the urge to skip any tracks, although More Fool Me tempts me sometimes. I knew it was Phil's second lead vocal for Genesis, but I had to listen to it more than once to actually make out that it was him singing.

The songs flow beautifully from DWTMK to I Know What I Like, and then to Firth of Fifth. More Fool Me is a week ending for the first side, but I usually listen to it. The Cinema Show is outstanding of course. Live Over Europe has a medley of The Cage and the Cinema Show that I really like.

I like I Know What I Like quite a bit, but that may be because it was the first Peter Gabriel Genesis song I ever heard. It is on Turn It On Again, the Hits. I really like the way Phil sings it in concert. I find the album to be very consistent for the most part.

Keep those mowing blades sharp!

Last edited by Alvis; 12-02-10 at 09:28 AM.
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Old 12-01-10, 07:37 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis



The band only performed the first part on DWTMK on the Calling All Stations Tour.



Gabriel's voice sounds really good here.
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Old 12-01-10, 07:42 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I have no problem with Ray Wilson (whoever he was) singing that rather weak version of the song. I do however have a problem with them calling that Genesis.
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Old 12-01-10, 07:55 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Originally Posted by cungar View Post
I have no problem with Ray Wilson (whoever he was) singing that rather weak version of the song. I do however have a problem with them calling that Genesis.
I'm not sure they should have called it Genesis either. However, I'll save that for a later discussion when we get to that album.
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Old 12-01-10, 08:17 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Originally Posted by Alvis View Post
I'm not sure they should have called it Genesis either. However, I'll save that for a later discussion when we get to that album.
Let's hope that never happens
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Old 12-01-10, 08:25 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I heard the Ray Wilson era was Lemmy's favorite.
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Old 12-01-10, 10:03 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

I love Foxtrot just slightly more, but Selling is really just as good, I'd argue these two albums together are classic Genesis' peak. (I've never quite loved Lamb as much as it's been hyped).

The band manages that epic, sprawling feel that never quite dives into prog pretension here. And I even like Phil's timid little vocal on More Fool Me.
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Old 12-02-10, 09:54 AM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Originally Posted by cungar View Post
I have no problem with Ray Wilson (whoever he was) singing that rather weak version of the song. I do however have a problem with them calling that Genesis.
Poor Ray.. he even gets the short end of the stick from fans..
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Old 12-02-10, 12:48 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

To be fair, Genesis started sucking way before Ray Wilson was given the thankless job of replacing Phil Collins. It was really Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford's fault for recruiting him and calling it Genesis. It wasn't anything close to Genesis.
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Old 12-02-10, 05:08 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

We Can't Dance should definitely have been the end of the line for the band. Aside from the first three tracks, that album was one giant suckfest. Invisible Touch, on the other hand, is an awesome album.
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Old 12-02-10, 09:56 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

It's all with love, Lemmy!
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Old 12-02-10, 10:42 PM
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Re: Album By Album: Genesis

Originally Posted by Sierra Disc View Post
The band manages that epic, sprawling feel that never quite dives into prog pretension here. And I even like Phil's timid little vocal on More Fool Me.
That's one of the things I like about these early Genesis albums - it doesn't feel pretentious to me, even though there seem to be plenty of opportunities for it.

This album is right up there with Foxtrot for me. While nothing matches the amazing "Supper's Ready" (and to a lesser extent "Watcher of the Skies"), taken together it works great as a whole. Genesis really feels like a band here - everyone has a moment to shine. Gabriel's singing seems more subdued, but it's really strong. He's showing more range than I heard before. He even sounds like Phil Collins on some of the higher notes. My two "musical goosebumps" moments came on a couple of instrumentals - the guitar solo in "Firth of Fifth" and the keyboard solo in "Cinema Show". Though, having first heard that solo as part of the "In the Cage" medley, it's a little disappointing that "Afterglow" doesn't follow it up

I like this kind of "loose" concept album - the concept not being some silly pretentious story, but a theme. And I like how the music matches the theme - featuring classical and medieval sounds with modern (well, for 1973) rock. At times, it reminds me of late-60s The Kinks ("Village Green" and "Arthur"). And the busy "Battle of Epping Forest" reminded me of a 60s mini rock opera (like The Who's "A Quick One, While He's Away").

Originally Posted by Sierra Disc View Post
I've never quite loved Lamb as much as it's been hyped
Yeah, Lamb has been a tough one for me to love as well. It'll be interesting to revisit it. Maybe the problem was that I always heard it hyped as THE masterpiece of early Genesis. And until I listened to it, I was only familiar with Phil Collins as lead singer. In retrospect, "Foxtrot" or "Selling England" (or maybe "Live") would be a much better introduction.
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