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I thought I had seen it all from recording industry...

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I thought I had seen it all from recording industry...

Old 07-09-07, 12:39 AM
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I thought I had seen it all from recording industry...

http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbc...707080343/1006.

Next they will start hitting the high school "battle of the bands" for royalties.
Old 07-09-07, 01:36 AM
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You have GOT to be KIDDING me!

Originally Posted by Lou Andrus
"One guy called and said I had to pay him if I played any gospel music at all."
Andrus said a friend of his who owned a restaurant that did not feature music was contacted by a company looking to charge him because it owned the rights to a Hank Williams Jr. song, "Are You Ready for Some Football?" The song preceded every "Monday Night Football" telecast, which the restaurant carried on its televisions.
This is outright extortion. I have 99 percent classical and film music in my collection, so fortunately I've given the major labels next to nothing in royalties.

And no way will I ever start subsidizing them. Not after this garbage.
Old 07-09-07, 02:39 AM
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so if you've purchased a physical/digital copy of a record, then there's no royalties to collect, but if you subscribe to and "pipe in satellite music to a fitness center" you have to pay licensing fees? i thought the only time you pay royalties is when you 'record' a copywritten song, not perform live. if that's not that case, i wouldn't pay a cent.
Old 07-09-07, 06:28 AM
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wow. I'm not even sure what to write.
Old 07-09-07, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by spinning plates
so if you've purchased a physical/digital copy of a record, then there's no royalties to collect, but if you subscribe to and "pipe in satellite music to a fitness center" you have to pay licensing fees? i thought the only time you pay royalties is when you 'record' a copywritten song, not perform live. if that's not that case, i wouldn't pay a cent.
Not only satellite radio, but terrestrial radio as well. If you own an establishment, and you have FM, AM, or satellite radio on, you are supposed to pay royalties for it.
Old 07-09-07, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by palebluedot
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbc...707080343/1006.

Next they will start hitting the high school "battle of the bands" for royalties.
...or karaoke nights... jesus..
Old 07-09-07, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by spinning plates
so if you've purchased a physical/digital copy of a record, then there's no royalties to collect, but if you subscribe to and "pipe in satellite music to a fitness center" you have to pay licensing fees? i thought the only time you pay royalties is when you 'record' a copywritten song, not perform live. if that's not that case, i wouldn't pay a cent.
the rules are different since bars and restaraunts are playing it for others and making money off it.
Old 07-09-07, 08:59 AM
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Through their own lack of foresight their industry is dying right out from under them, and they are desperate to get income any way they can.
Old 07-09-07, 09:00 AM
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They've GOT to be kidding...what in the world? This is extremely preposterous!

Now, maybe someone can explain something to me about the regular commercial radio vs. satellite radio. The article says "had to pay a few hundred dollars a year to licensing companies in order to pipe in satellite music to his fitness center. Commercial radio is free to play because the radio stations have already paid the necessary fees."
Doesn't satellite radio pay the fees just like the commercial radio?
Old 07-09-07, 09:01 AM
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....

I was prepared to come in here after seeing the title and just shake my head and go "those silly record companies" again. But... wow. Just wow. They continue to amaze with the depths they'll sink to. It's so sad where the music indistry has been going, and will continue to go. What needs to be done to get these idiotic laws changed??
Old 07-09-07, 11:00 AM
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I can't wait until they start charging street performers for royalties. Have you seen all those people on the Santa Monica Boardwalk getting rich off of other musician's songs? Something's gotta be done!
Old 07-09-07, 11:48 AM
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all this does is make the recording industry seem like the leeches they are - they are trying to extort all the money they can, and in every possible way... bunch of greedy twats.
Old 07-09-07, 12:14 PM
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RIAA Bans Telling Friends About Songs

LOS ANGELES—The Recording Industry Association of America announced Tuesday that it will be taking legal action against anyone discovered telling friends, acquaintances, or associates about new songs, artists, or albums. "We are merely exercising our right to defend our intellectual properties from unauthorized peer-to-peer notification of the existence of copyrighted material," a press release signed by RIAA anti-piracy director Brad Buckles read. "We will aggressively prosecute those individuals who attempt to pirate our property by generating 'buzz' about any proprietary music, movies, or software, or enjoy same in the company of anyone other than themselves." RIAA attorneys said they were also looking into the legality of word-of-mouth "favorites-sharing" sites, such as coffee shops, universities, and living rooms.
Old 07-09-07, 12:20 PM
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hehe good ole Onion
Old 07-09-07, 01:03 PM
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You know, I had some friends in my car while I was playing a CD - I hope they don't come after my friends for having listened to my music for free...
Old 07-09-07, 02:35 PM
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Sorry to be the sole person of dissent here (at least so far), but this has been the case for decades. Every commercial establishment that has music played (either live or piped in) must pay royalty fees, whether it's your local pizza shop or pubs, on up to larger nightclubs and concert halls and convention centers.

ASCAP/BMI/etc have lots of representatives that go around writing down all the songs they hear in various places. These are all put into a database, and the money that's collected then gets divvied up between artists/songwriters.

It's the law, it has been for many many years.

If this cafe sells just one or two extra cups of coffee a week at $4 each, it more than pays for all the rights they need to buy. Don't you think that's a pretty good deal?
Old 07-09-07, 02:42 PM
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Shit, I've had Brittany's "Toxic" in my head all day (don't ask), does that mean they're gonna come after me now?

But seriously, at the very least, there should be (and I think there is) a size/business income limit applied to this. Smaller restaurants and coffee shops that don't profit from the music being played shouldn't be forced to pay.
Old 07-09-07, 02:58 PM
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I'm still waiting for the 'Happy Birthday to You' music police
Old 07-09-07, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Giles
I'm still waiting for the 'Happy Birthday to You' music police
Most restaurants and rest stops have their own birthday song now, but I wonder how much it would cost them if they used the happy birthday song.
Old 07-09-07, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected]
ASCAP/BMI/etc have lots of representatives that go around writing down all the songs they hear in various places. These are all put into a database, and the money that's collected then gets divvied up between artists/songwriters.
It seems to me that whole process, from travel expenses on down, would cost more money than the trickle they could get from shaking down small ma and pa businesses. And besides, they really can't prove anything was played other than on the night they were there.
Old 07-09-07, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected]
Sorry to be the sole person of dissent here (at least so far), but this has been the case for decades. Every commercial establishment that has music played (either live or piped in) must pay royalty fees, whether it's your local pizza shop or pubs, on up to larger nightclubs and concert halls and convention centers.

ASCAP/BMI/etc have lots of representatives that go around writing down all the songs they hear in various places. These are all put into a database, and the money that's collected then gets divvied up between artists/songwriters.

It's the law, it has been for many many years.

If this cafe sells just one or two extra cups of coffee a week at $4 each, it more than pays for all the rights they need to buy. Don't you think that's a pretty good deal?
I agree. This is a well established and very straightforward practice. If they were doing this in their home and ASCAP went after them, I could see the outrage, but this is a business, and this is part of the cost of doing business.

But seriously, at the very least, there should be (and I think there is) a size/business income limit applied to this. Smaller restaurants and coffee shops that don't profit from the music being played shouldn't be forced to pay.
I imagine this is the reduced fee. It seems rather small for a blanket license fee.
Old 07-09-07, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Giles
I'm still waiting for the 'Happy Birthday to You' music police

"It took two people to write that song?"
Old 07-09-07, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Aphex Twin
Most restaurants and rest stops have their own birthday song now, but I wonder how much it would cost them if they used the happy birthday song.

I remember the one they sang at American Cafe

'Up Down, Turn Around have a happy birthday
Up, Down Turn Around Have a Happy Day!"

repeat

everyone!...

Old 07-09-07, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Jason
I agree. This is a well established and very straightforward practice. If they were doing this in their home and ASCAP went after them, I could see the outrage, but this is a business, and this is part of the cost of doing business.
I agree, despite thinking it's horribly lame. Them's the rules and they've been enforced this way for years. This isn't a new development.

But seriously, at the very least, there should be (and I think there is) a size/business income limit applied to this. Smaller restaurants and coffee shops that don't profit from the music being played shouldn't be forced to pay.
I find it hard to believe that ANY business establishment would do something that made them no money. If there really is zero positive effect on income, then they wouldn't do it, and would replace the corner where the musician sets up with another table or two. Now maybe they can't measure the economic impact and maybe most patrons only order one cup, whether there is music or not, the music is obviously there to get people to stay, and to keep them coming back.
Old 07-09-07, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected]
Sorry to be the sole person of dissent here (at least so far), but this has been the case for decades. Every commercial establishment that has music played (either live or piped in) must pay royalty fees, whether it's your local pizza shop or pubs, on up to larger nightclubs and concert halls and convention centers.

ASCAP/BMI/etc have lots of representatives that go around writing down all the songs they hear in various places. These are all put into a database, and the money that's collected then gets divvied up between artists/songwriters.

It's the law, it has been for many many years.

If this cafe sells just one or two extra cups of coffee a week at $4 each, it more than pays for all the rights they need to buy. Don't you think that's a pretty good deal?

Yes it's the law and has been around for a long time. Large clubs/bars have paid these fees to remain legit. My band also paid royalties becuase we were doing national tours and some clubs didn't pay them, we often recouped this money from the promoter though. It wasn't until recently though that these agencies started to go after tiny places like this which is all part of the crack down by the recording industry to scrape as much money together as they can. If I am not mistaken though there is a loop-hole for "open mike night" but that was a long time ago, I am sure they tightened their rules up by now.

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