Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > Entertainment Discussions > Music Talk
Reload this Page >

How do you take good pictures at an indoor rock concert (pics wanted)

Music Talk Discuss music in all its forms: CD, MP3, DVD-A, SACD and of course live

How do you take good pictures at an indoor rock concert (pics wanted)

Old 05-02-02, 02:03 PM
  #1  
DVD Talk Hero
Thread Starter
 
Rypro 525's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: a frikin hellhole
Posts: 28,263
How do you take good pictures at an indoor rock concert (pics wanted)

Whenever i take them, it is too dark to see anything, but a friend showed me some pictures taken at George Mason University (i think) and got really good pictures of no doubt. Also, try to state the venue and the band if known.
Rypro 525 is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 02:47 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: A suburbČ of Miami
Posts: 5,943
High speed film, probably.
Aghama is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 05:02 PM
  #3  
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 3,128
Fuji 800 pushed twice (may get a little grain though).
saoirse is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 06:14 PM
  #4  
DVD Talk Hero
Thread Starter
 
Rypro 525's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: a frikin hellhole
Posts: 28,263
thanks, i have a olympus aps camera. Can i see some pics of some of your pictures and the techniques that you used. Also, do you have to be in a certin row to get them to come out good.
Rypro 525 is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 06:47 PM
  #5  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: A suburbČ of Miami
Posts: 5,943
Originally posted by saoirse
Fuji 800 pushed twice (may get a little grain though).
Pushed twice? As in double exposed?
Aghama is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 08:06 PM
  #6  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Vermont
Posts: 9,774
Originally posted by Aghama

Pushed twice? As in double exposed?
no
stevevt is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 08:24 PM
  #7  
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 130
Edit the levels in Photoshop. It works wonders for this. But you will want to use the proper film speed to gain as much detail as possible. Just an idea.

/ modiman.
modiman is offline  
Old 05-02-02, 09:06 PM
  #8  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,454
Originally posted by stevevt


no
Hey that's a great website...stevevt...any other suggestions for photography websites with how-tos or tutorials?
palebluedot is offline  
Old 05-03-02, 06:20 AM
  #9  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Vermont
Posts: 9,774
Originally posted by palebluedot

...any other suggestions for photography websites with how-tos or tutorials?
yes

stevevt is offline  
Old 05-03-02, 07:59 AM
  #10  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,454
Originally posted by stevevt


yes



thanks
palebluedot is offline  
Old 05-04-02, 05:48 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 486
Speaking as someone who only uses a crappy point-and-shoot(35mm) where the settings can't be adjusted much:

Minimum film speed is 800. 1600 may be even better with a point-and-shoot, depending on your tolerance for the grain visible. In my experience, on slower film the photos don't come out at all unless you use a flash.

Which brings us to....Turn your off the flash! It only reaches about 15 feet in front of you. If you're that close to the stage, it will annoy the performers (not to mention others in the crowd) and wash out the stage lighting. If there are heads in front of you in the frame, they will be much more brightly lit than your main subject. And if photography isn't allowed at the show, the flash will also be a beacon signal to your location for some burly security guard who wants to confiscate your film and/or camera.

And without a flash, you probably won't get very good shots unless you are close to the stage. If you're a distance away from the stage, most of your shots will all look the same anyway unless you're taking photos for the lighting or background video screens.

Point-and-shoots will likely have problems metering the light properly - usually they average the light over the whole frame or they have a spot meter that's too large to be really useful. You have to hold the camera very still because the aperture will probably be open longer than when you normally take photos. That's tough to do near the front of the stage unless you can steady yourself on the front rail.

Try to take pictures when your subject is standing still and the stage lighting is bright. Using the zoom lens may give you a better composition, but it also will lessen the amount of light reaching the film. You probably will have to do some trial and error with your camera to figure out its idiosyncrasies.

You might have a better time at the show if you leave the camera at home so that you're not always thinking about taking pictures. Even if you do manage to get close to the stage, a lot of your shots won't come out anyway. I only got a few per roll that I was happy with. But I am pretty happy with some of the ones I did get.




cerulean is offline  
Old 05-04-02, 06:30 AM
  #12  
Mod Emeritus
 
benedict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Outside of the U.S.A.
Posts: 10,674
Some interesting information here but this is scarcely on-topic for the Music Forum i.e. although one might find the practical experience of concert-goers here to be useful this isn't really about the music itself....

.... I've locked this one and moved a copy over to Other so interested parties can continue sharing.


Benedict

Last edited by benedict; 05-04-02 at 06:33 AM.
benedict is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.