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Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

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Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Old 08-05-17, 04:05 PM
  #26  
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

What's Netflix's rationale for a five festival limit?
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Old 08-08-17, 09:46 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Originally Posted by Mabuse View Post
What's Netflix's rationale for a five festival limit?
Seemingly it's just to ensure as few people as possible see it outside of their service (which, as I've mentioned, really devalues the festival experience). My guess is that they think (and rightly so) that five festivals -- especially high-profile ones like Cannes, Sundance, TIFF, etc. -- are enough to garner key reviews from most of the major entertainment publications and websites in order to get pull-quotes for the marketing department. Not that those will matter when, as someone mentioned earlier in this thread, "discovery" in the streaming wastelands is virtually non-existent.

I've cut my TIFF ticket order in half this year, just to be safe. Don't see the point in supporting movies at $25 a pop (plus parking and/or transit) that will probably already have "benefactors" like Prime and Netflix waiting to make them disappear only days later.
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Old 08-08-17, 09:59 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Originally Posted by Brian T View Post
Seemingly it's just to ensure as few people as possible see it outside of their service (which, as I've mentioned, really devalues the festival experience). My guess is that they think (and rightly so) that five festivals -- especially high-profile ones like Cannes, Sundance, TIFF, etc. -- are enough to garner key reviews from most of the major entertainment publications and websites in order to get pull-quotes for the marketing department. Not that those will matter when, as someone mentioned earlier in this thread, "discovery" in the streaming wastelands is virtually non-existent.

I've cut my TIFF ticket order in half this year, just to be safe. Don't see the point in supporting movies at $25 a pop (plus parking and/or transit) that will probably already have "benefactors" like Prime and Netflix waiting to make them disappear only days later.
The Prime thing from SXSW is unlikely to apply to anything other than SXSW, those films tend to be incredibly low budget with very few having actual distribution. TIFF is substantially higher up on the totem pole, even their Midnight Madness field.

Amazon acquiring a movie outright means it'll still get a formal theatrical release window, they treat Amazon Prime like their own version of HBO/Starz/Showtime with a similar 8 month window.

Netflix, yeah, then it's being relegated to the pile. Great for me, likely bad for traction unless the movie really stands out.
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Old 08-08-17, 10:47 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Originally Posted by RichC2 View Post
The Prime thing from SXSW is unlikely to apply to anything other than SXSW, those films tend to be incredibly low budget with very few having actual distribution. TIFF is substantially higher up on the totem pole, even their Midnight Madness field.

Amazon acquiring a movie outright means it'll still get a formal theatrical release window, they treat Amazon Prime like their own version of HBO/Starz/Showtime with a similar 8 month window.

Netflix, yeah, then it's being relegated to the pile. Great for me, likely bad for traction unless the movie really stands out.
I possibly shouldn't have said "Prime and Netflix" in my last paragraph there, since the article I posted earlier was indeed specifically about Netflix and how producers are reacting to their projects getting buried on it, but since Prime did announce plans to repeat the SXSW process at TIFF and other festivals, I just can't see them giving everything they acquire a theatrical run. Which is fair, since not everything at TIFF is automatically worthy just because TIFF is higher up the food chain, and I can say that with at least some confidence after 18 years of attendance. In fact, I was flipping through my old ticket stubs recently -- all of which I keep as souvenirs -- and noticed quite a few movies I saw that were barely and/or never heard from again on North American soil via DVD, cable or streaming (to the best of my knowledge, but I do try to keep tabs). Mind you, if Amazon shows more restraint at TIFF than they did at SXSW and only acquires a handful of truly worthy films, then yes, I'd expect at least some theatrical exposure to build word of mouth that will then benefit the streams and maybe even justify Blu-ray releases. But if they scoop up 30 or 40 films again, it's a pretty sure bet that a bunch of 'em will go straight behind the pay wall. How can they not?

Then again, as mentioned way back, maybe getting dumped on streams is about the best some indie, foreign and no-budget wonders can hope for in this over-saturated global marketplace where everybody and their mother can "make a movie". As least there's a guarantee that it's playing somewhere. Still, the need for such films to play at film festivals at all will lessen with time in my opinion, which is why I'm taking a cautious approach this year. Hopefully I'll be proven wrong.
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Old 08-08-17, 10:54 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Speaking of which, I do think they do need to better clarify the difference between Amazon formally acquiring a film (like Manchester by the Sea, which Amazon paid $10m for) and movies that use Amazon Video Direct (ie: the SXSW movies) in their future press releases.
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Old 08-08-17, 11:12 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Very good point! Especially as there will probably always be more of the latter. Anything to more clearly separate the wheat from the chaff.
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Old 01-18-18, 11:27 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

SAN FRANCISCO/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O), which has made waves in recent years buying art-house movies at the Sundance Film Festival, is heading to the prestigious event this week with a long-term change in the works: It plans to shift resources from independent films to more commercial projects, people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

The move reflects a new phase in the online retailer’s entertainment strategy. Initially, Amazon worked on high-brow movies that would win awards, put it on the map in Hollywood and help it attract top talent.

Now, Amazon wants programming aimed at a far wider audience as it pursues its central business goal: persuading more people to join its video streaming service and shopping club Prime.


The change in the movie strategy parallels a similar shift in Amazon Studios’ TV operation, which is also moving to bigger-budget fare.

Amazon expects to go after films with budgets in the $50 million range at the expense of indie projects costing around $5 million, one person familiar with the plans said on the condition of anonymity. Another person confirmed the overall strategy, adding that the Culver City, California, studio is still working out the details on how much of its film budget will go to these bigger releases.

Amazon declined to comment.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...dium=trueAnthe

Last edited by dex14; 01-18-18 at 11:44 AM.
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Old 01-18-18, 11:31 AM
  #33  
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Curious to see what they find. Film festivals aren't a magical place to find palatable films. It's more like sifting through all the trash to find the good one.
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Old 01-18-18, 11:48 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Originally Posted by Troy Stiffler View Post
Curious to see what they find. Film festivals aren't a magical place to find palatable films. It's more like sifting through all the trash to find the good one.
Which means we might suddenly be seeing a lot more high-concept, lowest-common denominator, global-friendly $50 million films jockeying for "prestigious" festival play and laurels in order to be seen by Amazon and others who'll presumably follow their lead in broad-based pandering. In which case, expect more ACTUAL trash infiltrating film festivals. But I wonder if they might find more competition from the studios on that kind of fare? On the other hand, if this leads to fewer small films in general getting buried on streaming sites immediately after a festival screening, I'm cool with that, even if some new model probably needs to emerge to better showcase them.
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Old 01-18-18, 02:00 PM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Is Sundance the right place to go shopping for $50 million dollar productions?
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Old 01-18-18, 02:15 PM
  #36  
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

I don't think it's a bad plan at all... assuming they don't completely forego Indie films, they gotta find a way to compete with Disney-Fox marriage and their upcoming network of mega-movies on demand.
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Old 04-23-18, 07:51 PM
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Netflix Distribution and Awards Discussion

This would be interesting..

Netflix has considered buying theaters, including Mark Cuban's Landmark, to gain an Oscar edge, sources say

Story Here



Netflix, the global streaming giant that has dramatically changed the TV industry and clashed with movie theater owners, may be ready to move onto the big screen in a new and surprising way — by owning cinemas.

The Los Gatos, Calif., company has explored the idea of buying movie theaters in Los Angeles and New York that would enable it to screen a growing pipeline of feature films and documentaries, according to people familiar with the situation.
Although no cinema deal has materialized, the idea of Netflix buying a theater chain would mark a new phase in the company's rapid ascent to become one of the most powerful players in the entertainment industry.

Netflix has attracted its 125 million subscribers worldwide by releasing dozens of original films and TV shows annually on its fast-growing streaming service, bypassing the traditional theatrical market, as well as the cable bundle.

Netflix has promised to spend as much as $8 billion this year on original and licensed content for its subscribers who pay a monthly fee to binge shows and films. The company said in October that it would release 80 original movies this year alone, and has done film deals with such high-profile figures as Adam Sandler, Martin Scorsese and the Duplass brothers.

The downside for Netflix is that its movies are locked out of major theater chains, and have been effectively blocked from one of the world's most prestigious film festivals.
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Old 04-24-18, 12:59 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Does it have to be a chain? Can't they just own one theater on each coast?
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Old 04-24-18, 01:02 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Let 'em. Local theatres are disappearing entirely anyway, like Blockbuster.
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Old 04-25-18, 11:46 AM
  #40  
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Wouldn’t this violate the Paramount Decree of 1948? You can’t make movies, distribute movies, and exhibit movies theatrically. That’s a monopoly.
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Old 04-25-18, 11:55 AM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Originally Posted by Mabuse View Post
Wouldn’t this violate the Paramount Decree of 1948? You can’t make movies, distribute movies, and exhibit movies theatrically. That’s a monopoly.
They could create a separate company, couldn't they?
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Old 04-25-18, 01:08 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

The way Streaming is headed for TV companies where each has it's own service for their shows, it seems like a logical step.

Last edited by Giantrobo; 04-25-18 at 03:04 PM.
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Old 04-25-18, 01:58 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

It's stupid that Netflix has to do this in order to have its movies eligible for the Oscars and other film festivals/awards. Speilberg agrees with this.

A movie is a movie is a movie. Who cares if it hit theatres or not?

The movie industry needs to get with the times. More and more people have decided to watch from the comfort of their own home and eventually movie theatre attendance will dwindle to a fraction of what it's at now.

I'll watch a movie at home over a movie theatre 100% of the time.
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Old 04-25-18, 02:13 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Spielberg does not agree with that. His contention is that Netflix movies are TV movies and should be eligible for Emmys, but not Oscars, regardless of their brief theatrical distribution window.
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Old 04-25-18, 04:58 PM
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re: Films released by streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, etc.) -- Distribution, Awards, etc. Discussion

Originally Posted by bluetoast View Post
Spielberg does not agree with that. His contention is that Netflix movies are TV movies and should be eligible for Emmys, but not Oscars, regardless of their brief theatrical distribution window.
Sorry, that's what I meant.. I re-worded my sentence and forgot to fix that part.

In any case, Speilberg's a putz.
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Old 02-19-19, 02:06 PM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Amazon’s Jennifer Salke spent over $40 million on Sundance acquisitions at last month’s festival, and now she’s giving us a peek at her film plans – including hints at when we’ll be able to see buzzy movies like the Mindy Kaling comedy Late Night, the Adam Driver-led CIA drama The Report, and more.

The chief of Amazon Studios has opened up in a pair of new interviews which paint a larger picture of the company’s approach to its film slate since Salke took over that position last year. Read on to learn what to expect, including the type of movies Nicole Kidman wants to make under her production deal there and Salke’s proclamation that Amazon can handle “at least” twenty direct-to-Prime films per year in addition to their theatrical releases.

A Shifting Theatrical Release Model, and the Future of Amazon’s Sundance Acquisitions

Variety reports that Amazon “is keen to acquire finished films, but says it will also keep producing its own movies. In addition, Amazon will start making films that will debut exclusively on its Prime subscription service and will forgo theatrical release.” Salke and her team dropped $47 million at Sundance for Late Night, The Report, Brittany Runs a Marathon, Honey Boy, and One Child Nation, and all of those movies will be getting theatrical releases – but whereas the company previously stuck with a 90-day theatrical window before allowing subscribers to stream their films on Amazon Prime Video, they’re now exploring “a variety of windows” for their theatrical model.

Salke elaborated in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter:

“You’ll see less of the three month window, and you’ll see different variations…In some cases, it’ll be important for us to get the movie quickly to the service, while still following through with a theatrical release that feels much shorter, two weeks even, two to eight weeks. And then in other cases, we’ll allow, where it makes sense, a wider release strategy.”

Translation: by releasing certain titles on their streaming platform quickly, Amazon Studios could attract new subscribers – the larger company’s ultimate goal.

But don’t expect them to abandon theaters altogether. “We still want to be able to really support a theatrical release,” Salke told THR. “I mean, look at Cold War. We are fully behind that. We would do that again tomorrow.” Variety says Late Night will follow the strategy of The Big Sick and hit theaters in June or July, while Honey Boy and The Report will arrive during this year’s award’s season in the fall.

Prepare for an Influx of Direct-to-Amazon Movies

Amazon is also looking to make movies that debut directly on Amazon Prime without going to theaters at all. Horror producer Jason Blum is making eight films for the streaming service with a diverse slate of filmmakers, and Oscar winner Nicole Kidman also has a deal in place to make movies and TV shows for Amazon. Salke told THR what type of content Kidman is interested in:

“I’m working with Nicole Kidman on this slate of sexy, date night movies that no one’s making any more, like No Way Out or Cruel Intentions. Those kind of, ‘I need to stay home and just drink wine with my girlfriend, or my boyfriend, husband, and watch this.’ This is really Nicole’s thing. When I met with her my second week in the job, we made the first-look deal out of this lunch. She was like, ‘Where are the hot, sexy movies?’ We had a meeting of the minds on it, and I’m like, ‘Let’s just get those movies directly, where we could release over the summer.’ Every Saturday night, one of those comes out, and then you create some binge-ability and a marketing story behind it.”

With Netflix having a summer of romantic comedies last year with Set It Up and To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, and now Amazon’s promise to bring back “provocative” sexy date movies for adults (Salke name-checked Basic Instinct to Variety), it looks like the streaming services are coming in to provide a home for entertainment that can’t seem to find another place in Hollywood among the small-budget horror films and mega-budget superhero movies.

And Salke, who previously served as the president of NBC Entertainment and oversaw shows like Glee, won’t forget about the young adult market. She’s already putting that into practice in television, but that will extend to movies as well. All in all, she explained, “there could be 20 direct to service movies managed within a given year also at least.”

Elsewhere in the articles, the Amazon chief alluded to the idea that the company is open to making big-budget comic book movies and effects-heavy tentpole productions – though there aren’t any plans for those yet. She also revealed that they’d be open to having the Oscars on Amazon Prime Video, so if ABC gets fed up with falling ratings and lets its contract expire, we may be seeing the trophies handed out on a streaming service one day.
https://www.slashfilm.com/amazon-fil...vwrbXMyH6tIG_M
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Old 02-20-19, 12:10 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

As a Prime Member, I hope Amazon steps it up...they are FAR behind NF in original streaming content.
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Old 02-20-19, 04:52 AM
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Re: Amazon bulk-buying at film festivals

Translation: by releasing certain titles on their streaming platform quickly, Amazon Studios could attract new subscribers – the larger company’s ultimate goal.
This might work with people that follow certain movies but the general public doesn't follow, or care, what's at Sundance.
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Old 03-02-19, 11:06 AM
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Re: The 91st Academy Awards --> 2019 Awards Show Discussion

Dear Mr. Spielberg,

STFU.

Sincerely,
A fan.

https://ew.com/movies/2019/03/01/ste...flix-oscars-2/
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Old 03-02-19, 12:08 PM
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Re: The 91st Academy Awards --> 2019 Awards Show Discussion

Originally Posted by melasnus View Post
Dear Mr. Spielberg,

STFU.

Sincerely,
A fan.

https://ew.com/movies/2019/03/01/ste...flix-oscars-2/
Do you disagree with this part of it?

Spielberg has spoken openly about how films debuting on streaming platforms such as Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu should only be considered in the TV movie space at the Emmy Awards, and not in the film categories at the Oscars. “Once you commit to a television format, you’re a TV movie. The good show deserves an Emmy, but not an Oscar,” he said last year.
Personally I'm fine with that. If a streaming service release a movie for a limited theatrical run before coming to Streaming, it should be eligible but if it's Day & Date on everyone's TV, I am totally fine with that being a considered a TV movie and therefor ineligible for Oscar consideration.
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