Release List Reviews Shop Join News DVD Giveaways Video Games Advertise
DVD Reviews | Theatrical Reviews | Price Search Buy Stuff Here
DVD Talk
DVD Reviews DVD Talk Headlines HD Reviews


Add to My Yahoo! - RSS 2.0 - RSS 2.0 - DVD Talk Podcast RSS -


Go Back   DVD Talk Forum > Entertainment Discussions > Movie Talk

Movie Talk A Discussion area for everything movie related including films In The Theaters

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-17-17, 05:22 PM   #26
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,971
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mondo Kane View Post
The first two-thirds are very well paced and contain the best acting. It's just that The whole "Death Row" section gets overlong and flat. What I mostly couldn't believe was after (Surprisingly) setting up Biggie's role well, they don't even mention his death!!
Why would they? He was killed way after 2pac was shot in Vegas.

How is Puffy portrayed in the film?
Do they go into Tupac and Suge's beef with Dr. Dre?
I'm gonna take a wild guess that Dr. Dre's reputation is pretty clean in the film.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 06:32 PM   #27
DVD Talk Legend
 
DaveyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 17,672
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deadman31 View Post
Another attempt to make a hero out of a man who was openly a thug and genuinely not a good person.
Tupac trained in ballet and acting at the Baltimore school of arts. The thug persona was for his career which eventually escalated to tragedy.



__________________
PSN: DaveyJoeG|Steam: DaveyJoe

Updated! My 2016 October Horror Movie Challenge compilation video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMlgp-OTM&t
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 06:50 PM   #28
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,971
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoe View Post
Tupac trained in ballet and acting at the Baltimore school of arts. The thug persona was for his career which eventually escalated to tragedy.
None of that necessarily contradicts what Deadman was saying. I doubt it was just an image to sell records. Tupac jumped one of the Hughes brothers with a bunch of Crip gang members. He was claiming a Blood gang at the time of his death. He claimed he had sex with Faith Evans, not in those words, and sent death threats to people in his music.

Do you mean to imply that going to a good school means you can't be a bad person?
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 06:55 PM   #29
DVD Talk Legend
 
DaveyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 17,672
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
None of that necessarily contradicts what Deadman was saying. I doubt it was just an image to sell records. Tupac jumped one of the Hughes brothers with a bunch of Crip gang members. He was claiming a Blood gang at the time of his death. He claimed he had sex with Faith Evans, not in those words, and sent death threats to people in his music.

Do you mean to imply that going to a good school means you can't be a bad person?
I'm implying that he was a talented human being that was much more than just a thug. I think Tupac's persona was a self-fulfilling prophecy due to the media's portrayal of rappers at the time. I found Deadman's description dismissive. The people on this forum tend to have negatively biased attitudes toward black rappers, even demonizing at times.
__________________
PSN: DaveyJoeG|Steam: DaveyJoe

Updated! My 2016 October Horror Movie Challenge compilation video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMlgp-OTM&t
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 07:16 PM   #30
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,971
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoe View Post
I'm implying that he was a talented human being that was much more than just a thug.
Well yeah. If you're a fan of an artist, you're more inclined to find excuses for their behavior.

Quote:
I think Tupac's persona was a self-fulfilling prophecy due to the media's portrayal of rappers at the time.
Doubt it. It probably was partially due to the fact that gangsta rap was more profitable since NWA blew up.
I mean, you think it was the media's portrayal of rappers, not the rapper's portrayals of themselves that romanticized gang culture?
NWA was rapping about being gangsters, killing women. Dr. Dre beat up Dee Barnes, and NWA was even interviewed saying that she deserved it. And yet the criticism of Dre by other rappers was that he wasn't a REAL gangster.
Snoop and DJ Quik were putting references to their gangs in their music.


Quote:
I found Deadman's description dismissive. The people on this forum tend to have negatively biased attitudes toward black rappers, even demonizing at times.
I'm a fan of Tupac's music since I was in high school and even I'll admit he was an asshole, and probably a bad dude.

So you're assuming Deadman is biased towards black rappers based on other forum members opinions? Tupac got a second chance after being bailed out of prison and was still promoting the most poisonous type of thinking in his music, while putting 1 or 2 uplifting songs on his albums.

Last edited by brayzie; 06-17-17 at 07:22 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 07:25 PM   #31
DVD Talk Legend
 
DaveyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 17,672
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Well yeah. If you're a fan of the performer, you're more inclined to find excuses for their behavior.
I'm not, I always preferred Biggie.


Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Doubt it. It probably was partially due to the fact that gangsta rap was more profitable since NWA blew up.
I mean, you think it was the media's portrayal of rappers, not the rapper's portrayals of themselves that romanticized gang culture?
NWA was rapping about being gangsters, killing women. Dr. Dre beat up Dee Barnes, and NWA was even interviewed saying that she deserved it. And yet the criticism of Dre by other rappers was that he wasn't a REAL gangster.
Snoop and DJ Quik were putting references to their gangs in their music.
It's a chicken or the egg situation. Extremely talented rappers like Killah Priest couldn't get signed because they didn't embrace thug culture. Gangster rap exploded in the 90s, and if you wanted to be successful, you had to chase it. But this is the time that violence was blamed on everything from rap, to video games, to heavy metal. Did those forms of entertainment glamorize or persuade people to violence? There's not much evidence to suggest that, but the media's demonizing of them only made them more popular with kids, which contributed to the cycle. Music/games/movies had to be violent because kids were buying them, kids were buying them because media made them taboo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
So you're assuming Deadman is biased towards black rappers based on other forum members opinions? Tupac got a second chance after being bailed out of prison and was still promoting the most poisonous type of thinking in his music, while putting 1 or 2 uplifting songs on his albums.
Based on the overwhelming trends on this forum and his comment in the context of this thread, yes. He certainly didn't convey open-mindedness.

The tone of the trailer is very simply trying to appeal to Tupac fans to maximize profits. It's the smart approach from a marketing perspective.
__________________
PSN: DaveyJoeG|Steam: DaveyJoe

Updated! My 2016 October Horror Movie Challenge compilation video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMlgp-OTM&t

Last edited by DaveyJoe; 06-17-17 at 07:40 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-17, 08:37 PM   #32
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,797
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

This made nearly $13 million on Friday. So it's going to have a good first weekend.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 03:42 AM   #33
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,971
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoe View Post
I'm not, I always preferred Biggie.
Fine. You're a fan of the sub-genre.

Quote:
It's a chicken or the egg situation. Extremely talented rappers like Killah Priest couldn't get signed because they didn't embrace thug culture.
Well if the demand wasn't there for conscious rap anymore I can see why labels might be hesitant to sign him. Everything has its time before going out of fashion. I remember conscious rap being popular, then gangsta rap being popular, then the shiny suit/bling era, Kanye West and Lil Wayne and a whole slew of weirdo avant garde shit, then you got drill music being popular, the list goes on.

Quote:
Gangster rap exploded in the 90s, and if you wanted to be successful, you had to chase it. But this is the time that violence was blamed on everything from rap, to video games, to heavy metal. Did those forms of entertainment glamorize or persuade people to violence? There's not much evidence to suggest that, but the media's demonizing of them only made them more popular with kids, which contributed to the cycle.
Well earlier you were implying that the media can influence entertainers, but it's unthinkable that entertainers could influence listeners.

You claim again that the media has enough power to influence, but not entertainment. Which is funny considering how much money is put into product placement in films and television.

Then you have stuff like this:
Rappers and Product Placement article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by from article
James pointed to the Busta Rhymes smash "Pass the Courvoisier" as an example of a product endorsement that changed the way deals are done. Busta's management has said that his massive hit about the cognac brand was merely an artistic choice, but it also helped Courvoisier's parent company, France's Allied Domecq, achieve a double-digit uptick in U.S. sales of the top-shelf liquor. Domecq later reached a promotional deal with Busta's management company, Violator. And Nelly must've known that his homage to Nike's Air Force Ones might land him a shoe deal, which of course it did, with a signature Nelly Nike shoe coming in the fall.
In my own experience, I would say that entertainment definitely has the potential to influence people, especially young kids, positively or negatively.

A couple articles here and here, on a rap cd that came out when I was in high school, which unfortunately had a big impact in my area. It was used as a gang recruitment tool while simultaneously encouraging active gang members to commit more violence.



Quote:
Music/games/movies had to be violent because kids were buying them, kids were buying them because media made them taboo.
First off, music/games/movies don't have to be violent just because there is a demand there. The producers of that content have a choice, just like the parents have a choice in what to buy/show their kids.



Quote:
Based on the overwhelming trends on this forum and his comment in the context of this thread, yes. He certainly didn't convey open-mindedness.

The tone of the trailer is very simply trying to appeal to Tupac fans to maximize profits. It's the smart approach from a marketing perspective.
I don't see what was inaccurate about what he said. Shit, I agree with him and I'm a fan of Tupac and Hip-Hop in general.

And yeah, I get the movie is about making profits, it's smart from a marketing perspective, just like it's smart for record labels to exploit ignorance that's detrimental to the community in order to make $$$$$$$$$. I'm not a fan of biographies which seem to border on hagiography, whether they be about musicians, politicians, or sports figures.

That said, I think Tupac Resurrection was a good movie that better showcases his artistic side and the experiences that helped develop it. I remember my friends not liking it saying it made Tupac look gay, and that they put in too many embarrassing things like his doing ballet. They wanted the rah-rah sensational stuff.

Tupac Vs was another movie I saw that interviewed him from Clinton Correctional Facility. He had a very charismatic presence and I doubt the new movie will manage to capture even a fraction of that.


Last edited by brayzie; 06-18-17 at 03:57 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 10:59 AM   #34
DVD Talk Legend
 
Why So Blu?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 24,771
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

Speaking of Tupac -- I hope they release Gridlock'd on BD someday. I always liked that flick.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 11:35 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 830
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

What I find strange is how these two shooting have been unsolved for so long. Not one person has drop a dime and what not. That's some serious shit...

I was always a bigger biggie fan and never really got into Tupac music. I did watch all his movies, he was good in them.

The movie was ok, nothing special.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 12:45 PM   #36
DVD Talk Legend
 
DaveyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 17,672
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Well if the demand wasn't there for conscious rap anymore I can see why labels might be hesitant to sign him. Everything has its time before going out of fashion. I remember conscious rap being popular, then gangsta rap being popular, then the shiny suit/bling era, Kanye West and Lil Wayne and a whole slew of weirdo avant garde shit, then you got drill music being popular, the list goes on.
And if you were trying to make it during gangsta rap's heyday, I can understand why rappers might feel compelled to embrace the thug culture. Black guys from poor communities don't always have a lot of opportunities to achieve the American dream. Sports and music have been the two most reliable industries for finding success for some time now.


Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Well earlier you were implying that the media can influence entertainers, but it's unthinkable that entertainers could influence listeners.

You claim again that the media has enough power to influence, but not entertainment. Which is funny considering how much money is put into product placement in films and television.

Then you have stuff like this:
Rappers and Product Placement article.

In my own experience, I would say that entertainment definitely has the potential to influence people, especially young kids, positively or negatively.

A couple articles here and here, on a rap cd that came out when I was in high school, which unfortunately had a big impact in my area. It was used as a gang recruitment tool while simultaneously encouraging active gang members to commit more violence.
Neither one of us can prove that violent rap influenced communities or people made violent rap popular, which is why I framed it as a chicken/egg situation. Parents and media have blamed violent entertainment for decades now but I have seen no statistical evidence that could prove that link. I personally believe that the drug war is responsible for the violence in poor communities, and hip hop listeners took to gangsta rap because it was relatable to the violence they experienced in everyday life.

Another thing is that I see a double standard, particularly among people who might visit sites like this. We have people who pop in their Reservoir Dogs bluray, then play Grand Theft Auto, and summarily dismiss criticisms of the violence in those forms of media, but when it comes to rap music... yeah, that might be a problem. Why is one form of violent entertainment harmless, but another dangerous?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
First off, music/games/movies don't have to be violent just because there is a demand there. The producers of that content have a choice, just like the parents have a choice in what to buy/show their kids.
Come on, you go where the money is. When Mortal Kombat hit it big, you saw a slew of violent copy cat fighting games. Artists like Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus go through a variety of personas until they figure out what sells. Countless musicians sell their soul to some extent just to find success. As a hip hop fan, this is one of the more frustrating forums I frequent in how quickly people dismiss the genre as garbage music for thugs.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
I don't see what was inaccurate about what he said. Shit, I agree with him and I'm a fan of Tupac and Hip-Hop in general.

And yeah, I get the movie is about making profits, it's smart from a marketing perspective, just like it's smart for record labels to exploit ignorance that's detrimental to the community in order to make $$$$$$$$$. I'm not a fan of biographies which seem to border on hagiography, whether they be about musicians, politicians, or sports figures.

That said, I think Tupac Resurrection was a good movie that better showcases his artistic side and the experiences that helped develop it. I remember my friends not liking it saying it made Tupac look gay, and that they put in too many embarrassing things like his doing ballet. They wanted the rah-rah sensational stuff.

Tupac Vs was another movie I saw that interviewed him from Clinton Correctional Facility. He had a very charismatic presence and I doubt the new movie will manage to capture even a fraction of that.

Tupac Vs scene
The post was made in September 2016, far too soon to dismiss the film for whitewashing a flawed person. Good biopics embrace the good with the bad, and from a dramatic perspective, I can't comprehend why a movie would want to diminish elements of violent and provocative behavior. To me it seemed like frustration that a single trailer didn't serve as confirmation of the negative portrayal of a thug. As for the biopics, I'll probably wait for Steve McQueen's version.
__________________
PSN: DaveyJoeG|Steam: DaveyJoe

Updated! My 2016 October Horror Movie Challenge compilation video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMlgp-OTM&t
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 02:09 PM   #37
DVD Talk Legend
 
E Unit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hell, but currently heading North
Posts: 10,275
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

I like Tupac's music, but I have no interest in seeing this. Maybe an HBO viewing at some point.

Also, looks like it may not be 100% accurate. So surprising.

__________________
"Whoa, did Walter Goggins fuck your mother?" - Osiris3657
Perhaps he did.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 02:34 PM   #38
DVD Talk Legend
 
Troy Stiffler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Under an I-10 Overpass
Posts: 19,451
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

Not surprised by Jada's clarifications. This movie comes across as a glorified movie of the week type biopic. I assume it got the green light because Straight Out of Compton was a hit.

Maybe we'll get a prestigious Tupac biopic someday. But I really doubt this is it.
__________________
Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 02:51 PM   #39
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,797
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

It is really too bad that John Singleton dropped out of directing this. But apparently he was going to tell it like it is, and whomever didn't want it that way.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 04:30 PM   #40
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Seattle and sometimes hell
Posts: 5,499
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

A few years back a documentary came out on 2pac, it was great. Also the commentary on it was great, it was like getting two movies in one.
__________________
"Truth has become unacceptable and dissent unpatriotic"
PS3 Tag: Baron-Of-Hell Steam: Baron_Of_Hell
SSBB: 4425-3985-1734 TWITTER: BaronOfHell
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 04:31 PM   #41
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 3,971
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Neither one of us can prove that violent rap influenced communities or people made violent rap popular, which is why I framed it as a chicken/egg situation. Parents and media have blamed violent entertainment for decades now but I have seen no statistical evidence that could prove that link. I personally believe that the drug war is responsible for the violence in poor communities, and hip hop listeners took to gangsta rap because it was relatable to the violence they experienced in everyday life.
No, but you dismiss one possibility while entertaining your own, which conveniently blames everything else: the media making Tupac a thug, media criticism making gangsta rap popular, and the drug war causing violence in communities.

I agree, those are contributing factors, except for the first one.

And Hip-Hop listeners aren't all from the hood nor do they all experience violence on a day-to-day basis. Hip-Hop has been a mainstream form of music for a while now, and there were nerdy white kids in my school that had more gangsta rap cds than I did. You put a catchy beat behind something and you can make just about anything sound cool. And for the listeners who do grow up in that kind of environment, gangsta rap/drill music/etc only help to reinforce that culture as normal and acceptable.

As for the drug war, yeah it probably made things worse, but even before that there were gangs preying on their own communities. In California we have gangs that have been here since the 1940s way before the Nixon took office. In NY there's gangs and mafia that go back waaaay before that. It's not just banned substances, it's prostitution, extortion, credit card scams, basically any racket that will make them money illegally. And look at the south. You had one big gang/terrorist organization, the KKK committing violence because...black people were free.

Speaking of negative influence via entertainment, there's the 1916 film Birth of a Nation based on the book The Klansman.

Quote:
Immediately after the film's release, the Ku Klux Klan experienced a surge in membership, and it continued to use the film as a recruiting tool for decades after that.
So yeah, I don't get why some people are so quick to discourage the idea that entertainment can influence. Unless you think that entertainment like the above film is okay?

Quote:
Another thing is that I see a double standard, particularly among people who might visit sites like this. We have people who pop in their Reservoir Dogs bluray, then play Grand Theft Auto, and summarily dismiss criticisms of the violence in those forms of media, but when it comes to rap music... yeah, that might be a problem. Why is one form of violent entertainment harmless, but another dangerous?
That's not me.


Quote:
Come on, you go where the money is. When Mortal Kombat hit it big, you saw a slew of violent copy cat fighting games. Artists like Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus go through a variety of personas until they figure out what sells. Countless musicians sell their soul to some extent just to find success.
Yeah, I understand that. That's a problem when people put profit ahead of social responsibility.

Quote:
As a hip hop fan, this is one of the more frustrating forums I frequent in how quickly people dismiss the genre as garbage music for thugs.
When I've come across a post dismissing Kanye West as garbage, I feel the same way.

But the guy you quoted didn't even criticize the music.


Quote:
The post was made in September 2016, far too soon to dismiss the film for whitewashing a flawed person. Good biopics embrace the good with the bad, and from a dramatic perspective, I can't comprehend why a movie would want to diminish elements of violent and provocative behavior.
To me it seemed like frustration that a single trailer didn't serve as confirmation of the negative portrayal of a thug.
Because many biopics don't have a good balance of good with the bad. They romanticize or rationalize the bad aspects while playing up the good.
Look at Straight Outta Compton. They made Dr. Dre look like this brave dude who's knocking out Bloods, and NOT beating up women like he did with Dee Barnes and Michel'le. Even in movies like Donnie Brasco they change the story so that Donnie would risk his career and case to give a mobster 100k in stolen money to buy a boat and leave, when in reality the real Donnie Brasco said that never happened. It's done so audiences can better empathize with the subject of the biopic.

Last edited by brayzie; 06-18-17 at 04:54 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-17, 05:21 PM   #42
DVD Talk Legend
 
DaveyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maryland
Posts: 17,672
Re: All Eyez on Me -- Tupac biopic

Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
No, but you dismiss one possibility while entertaining your own, which conveniently blames everything else: the media making Tupac a thug, media criticism making gangsta rap popular, and the drug war causing violence in communities.

I agree, those are contributing factors, except for the first one.

And Hip-Hop listeners aren't all from the hood nor do they all experience violence on a day-to-day basis. Hip-Hop has been a mainstream form of music for a while now, and there were nerdy white kids in my school that had more gangsta rap cds than I did. You put a catchy beat behind something and you can make just about anything sound cool. And for the listeners who do grow up in that kind of environment, gangsta rap/drill music/etc only help to reinforce that culture as normal and acceptable.

As for the drug war, yeah it probably made things worse, but even before that there were gangs preying on their own communities. In California we have gangs that have been here since the 1940s way before the Nixon took office. In NY there's gangs and mafia that go back waaaay before that. It's not just banned substances, it's prostitution, extortion, credit card scams, basically any racket that will make them money illegally. And look at the south. You had one big gang/terrorist organization, the KKK committing violence because...black people were free.

Speaking of negative influence via entertainment, there's the 1916 film Birth of a Nation based on the book The Klansman.



So yeah, I don't get why some people are so quick to discourage the idea that entertainment can influence. Unless you think that entertainment like the above film is okay?
It depends on what you mean by okay. I think people should have the freedom to make racist entertainment, and hopefully society would condemn it. I think people should have the right to make violent movies, video games, and music. It's up to the individual how they interpret it and react to it. I like violent movies and hip hop, but I don't think they've influenced me to act against my understanding of right and wrong.

I think humans are inherently violent by nature, and art/entertainment can serve as an outlet for those base tendencies. If gangsta rap didn't exist, I think people who have the capacity of violence against others would find another influence for those urges. As you said, gangs existed before gangsta rap, until we reach a Star Trek utopia, human beings will find ways to exert power over others, often through violent means.

Does entertainment or art influence people? Of course. When I was a kid I went outside and played Power Rangers with my friends. However I think pointing at entertainment as a catalyst for violence serves as a scapegoat, and takes accountability away from the individual. It's not okay to call your girlfriend a bitch just because rappers do. I'm a clean cut white guy, and I see gangsta rap as escapist entertainment, just like Pulp Fiction and Battlefield.

I admit that violent media can be troubling for people who struggled to separate right from wrong or fantasy from reality, but condemning the media is not a viable solution. I think those people will just find another reason to hurt others, religion is a popular one these days.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Okay, fine, I'm not accusing you specifically of anything. I'm explaining trends I notice on this forum, and how that shaped my original comment.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
When I've come across a post dismissing Kanye West as garbage, I feel the same way.

But the guy you quoted didn't even criticize the music.
And it's totally possible that I'm way off base and jumped to an incorrect conclusion. So many posters here have an unfair perception of rappers that I just like to tip the scale in the other direction.



Quote:
Originally Posted by brayzie View Post
Because many biopics don't have a good balance of good with the bad. They romanticize or rationalize the bad aspects while playing up the good.
Look at Straight Outta Compton. They made Dr. Dre look like this brave dude who's knocking out Bloods, and NOT beating up women like he did with Dee Barnes and Michel'le. Even in movies like Donnie Brasco they change the story so that Donnie would risk his career and case to give a mobster 100k in stolen money to buy a boat and leave, when in reality the real Donnie Brasco said that never happened. It's done so audiences can better empathize with the subject of the biopic.
I agree that this is done for dramatic purposes, for better or worse. I'm watching Narcos and they balance scenes of Pablo Escobar loving his family with ordering hits on police officers. To be fair, balance makes movies more interesting. Irredeemable villains or perfect, shiny heroes aren't very compelling. Of course, we all have bias when it comes to real people. Tupac fans might think that certain negative criticisms are unfair, whereas people who hate the guy's work will probably think the movie is too soft on him. I guess at the end of the day, true objectivity is hard to achieve.
__________________
PSN: DaveyJoeG|Steam: DaveyJoe

Updated! My 2016 October Horror Movie Challenge compilation video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2zMlgp-OTM&t
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-17, 10:52 AM   #43
DVD Talk Legend
 
raven56706's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Back in the Good Ole USA
Posts: 20,951
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

anyone watch it?
__________________
There is a master key and a spare key for the office. Dwight has them both. When I asked, "what if you die, Dwight? How will we get into the office?" He said, "if I'm dead, you guys have been dead for weeks."
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-17, 11:48 AM   #44
DRG
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: ND
Posts: 13,298
Re: All Eyez on Me (2017) -- Tupac biopic

I saw it. It wasn't terrible, but still felt rather generic. The script was the major problem... it just felt like they were going through life events without a real sense of a cohesive narrative flow. You see the events happen in Tupac's life, but they didn't do a great job of showing how these transformations took place. Like one minute he's in Digital Underground having fun, and the next scene he's recording this serious rap track.

There's also a weird dynamic that happens in later parts of the film where there's a conflict with somebody and the scene slows down on that person, as if to be hinting, "Maybe THIS guy is responsible for Tupac's death". They did it a few times and it just felt weird in this type of film.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:49 PM.


Copyright 2011 DVDTalk.com All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0