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The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Old 10-03-14, 05:29 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Still don't know how Netflix can afford to spend money to produce original content let alone license what they already carry, but whatdoIknow? As long as I don't have to pay extra to see these, I'll check them out- I'd also like to see Adam Sandler play a serial killer.
Old 10-03-14, 05:45 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by The Hollywood Reporter
Netflix's Ted Sarandos Explains Adam Sandler, 'Crouching Tiger' Deals: "Putting Our Money Where Our Mouth Is"
8:00 AM PST 10/03/2014 by Gregg Kilday

Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos shook up the Hollywood status quo twice this week with a couple of announcements signaling that the streaming video service is out to upend the existing movie business just as it’s challenged the television industry.

On Sept. 29, he announced a deal with The Weinstein Co. to finance the sequel Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend, which will premiere on Netflix and in Imax theaters on Aug. 28. 2015. The backlash from theater owners arrived swiftly, with exhibition giants Regal, AMC Theatres and Cinemark saying they wouldn't show the film on their own Imax screens. Then, the following day, Sarandos announced an even more ambitious pact: a deal to make four movies starring and produced by Adam Sandler (who also retains a nonexclusive, first-look deal at Sony). All four movies will debut exclusively on Netflix.

Having dropped those two bombshells, Sarandos explains how Netflix’s growing global imprint has influenced the decision to begin producing original movies, why Sandler was willing to forgo theatrical releases for the films and how exhibitors, resisting change, have all reacted “in lockstep.”

Q: So why did you approach Adam Sandler?

The more global we become, the more access we have to global behavior data so we can see what people are watching all around the world. In our earliest streaming days, we used to have the Sony output deal through Starz. We had almost all of Adam’s movies in the first pay window in the U.S. Today, we continue to have those movies in the first pay window in Canada. And then, through various windows that follow the pay window all the way to the deep catalog, we’ve licensed Adam’s movies in all of our territories. Very uniquely, he stands out for his global appeal to Netflix subscribers. Even movies that were soft in the U.S. [theatrically] outperformed dramatically on Netflix in the U.S. and around the world.

Q: Why is that? The conventional wisdom is that comedy is often too culturally specific to perform abroad.

I think chalk one up for data trumping conventional wisdom again. People told me a lot of things about France and Germany that aren’t true anymore now that we’ve been operating there for a couple of weeks.

Q: But since it’s only been a couple of weeks, how quickly can you get usable data in?

Almost immediately, because we’ve been at this long enough that we can build these regression models that tell you a lot about the first day, the first week, the first hour, the first month. And there are more scholarly ways to look at Adam’s international appeal. That he’s physical. That he’s a highly relatable person on screen. His movies are very, very repeatable. And Adam has always been a success, straight through his last film, Blended. That movie cost about $40 million to make and made about $140 million around the world. Most people would kill for those results. It skewed about 60 percent international, which, by the way, is how most movies are skewing now. So it could be that Adam’s just ahead of the curve. He’s made $3 billion in box office. He’s kind of grown up with us, and people see themselves with him from when he was the silly guy back in high school all the way to when he’s the silly dad today. It’s remarkable to me that his movies carry as well as they do in Germany, throughout Latin America, in the U.K. His box office is surprisingly international for U.S. comedy.

Q: So how does this compare to a studio deal? Will he go through a development process with your executives. Who will ultimately decide which projects get made?

We’ll collectively do it. He and [his production company] Happy Madison will develop the projects in conjunction with our team, and we’ll agree on what projects are best suited for each other.

Q: Will they all be broad Adam Sandler comedies, or could he decide to do a more serious movie as he has done on occasion?

We anticipate they will be Adam Sandler comedies. We’d absolutely be very open and thrilled if he wants to take a more serious role in some of the projects and could extend beyond the four films to accommodate some of those films as well.

Q: Will you have executives specifically assigned to film development?

We have a team already in place that’s been at it for quite a while. Pauline Fischer, who was previously in film acquisitions at Paramount, has been part of our team here for six years.

Q: Sandler’s been making movies with budgets in the $40 million to $80 million range. Will you be looking at the same kind of budgets?

You should think about them as having the same size and scope as his theatrical films.

Q: In a studio deal, someone like Sandler would also typically get some kind of back-end or profit participation. Since you’re not selling tickets, what kind of bonuses or incentives are you able to offer?

I can’t comment on the terms of the deal at all. We’re both super-enthusiastic. The deal came together beautifully and quickly, and both Netflix and Adam are thrilled with it.

Q: Over what time period do you expect Sandler to make the four movies?

He typically does a movie a year. We have to navigate around some commitments around sequels that are already in existence. So it’s hard to say exactly how long. But outside of his sequels and other commitments, it’s four consecutive projects.

Q: At the end of the day, who ends up owning the movies?

For all practical purposes, we have them forever. I don’t want to get into the technical nuances of the deal. These are movies that are developed and financed here, by us, and we own worldwide rights in all media.

Q: Are there rights you will sell off down the road?

It’s too early to say. But it’s important to understand what’s different about this deal. We are offering consumers a lot of choice here. Netflix is distributed in 50 countries around the world. It’s an incredibly affordable, well-distributed product that gives anyone with access to the Internet and a screen, access to content in a very affordable way. So even without doing other sales, we are still expanding consumer choice, because we are delivering simultaneously to the world. We value the exclusivity, maybe more so than we value the other potential revenue.

Q: You talk about exclusivity. Is there any possibility you’ll offer these movies to theaters day-and-date?

You shouldn’t expect that they will be released theatrically at all. Collectively, between Adam and us, we agreed that we were going to go right to Netflix. When we first started having the conversations, I thought doing theatrical might be the cost-of-entry to doing the deal. But Adam understands his audience. He was remarkably open to the idea that while people did see his movies in theaters to the tune of $3 billion, his real connection has come from home entertainment. His star has been raised by repeat viewing and his connection to that audience. So he was very open to the idea of going without theaters. For me, I would say my appetite to duke it out with theaters to get screens is low, because I really think the important point is we offer a lot of great access already. In the case of Crouching Tiger, I thought it was very important, coming out of the gate, to expand consumer choice for a movie that’s shot in a huge scope and can be seen on a huge screen. This [the Sandler deal] is a little different.

Q: Were you surprised at all by the intensity of the exhibitor backlash to your Crouching Tiger 2 announcement?

No, not at all. I would keep in mind that theater owners always react in lockstep with one another, which is fine. The real result will be what happens on August 28 [when Crouching Tiger 2 is released]. Unlike some of the reports, this is not a direct-to-video movie. This is a movie with size and scope. One thing that was misreported about the Crouching Tiger deal: It isn’t the Weinsteins releasing a movie in a unique way through Netflix; it’s Netflix releasing a movie in the way consumers want it. The Weinsteins aren’t releasing the movie, Netflix is. We paid for it. It’s our deal with Imax. The Weinsteins are the producers.

Q: What do these two deal, back-to-back, say about where you are going now?

Being able to compete for consumers' attention and dollars over the preciousness of access is a thing of the past. Everyone is using the Internet to globally market a product. To withhold access to that product for a year-plus is a thing of the past. I think it’s bad business. All we’re doing is saying, as soon as you can see this movie, you can see it all over the place at the same time. It’s a massive consumer frustration around the world about how long they have to wait after the U.S. to see television shows and movies. In the U.S., there’s the frustration of having to wait a year to watch a movie in the format that you choose.

Going into original films, the motivation was this: We have three major output deals: We have Disney, which starts with next year’s films. We have DreamWorks Animation, which has shows on Netflix today. Both of those are family programming decisions. They are hugely trusted brands for parents and loved by kids. Lots of repeat viewing. With the Weinsteins, and we’ve said it explicitly, we intend to be highly experimental with the windows and the versions of the movies that we put out when that deal kicks in in 2016.

There’s a general consensus that movies on Netflix and other pay services are old, because they are. So for us to meaningfully move the window up to where consumers want to see a movie, we have to step into producing content of our own — similarly as how we did with House of Cards when we wanted to release all episodes at the same time. We couldn’t have done that with an off-net show. By doing this, we are putting our money where our mouth is on behalf of the consumer. [In the case of Crouching Tiger], we’ll give you the movie the same day as it’s in theaters, and we’ll put it on as many screens as we can. We’re limited to Imax, because we think Imax is a really exceptional experience for theatergoing, and this movie is big. People should have the opportunity to see it on a big screen if they want to. But if they want to watch it at home, they can stream it in 4K.

Q: So are there more movie deals that you’re about to announce?

We have a few others in the pipeline now in various states. The typical output deal from a studio is 10 to 14 movies a year. Instead of going down the path of another traditional output deal, we wanted to do things in terms of that volume, but that would get to the screen much quicker for consumers.
Old 10-05-14, 04:48 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Will these still be eligible for Razzies?
Old 10-05-14, 05:02 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Good question, as typically a movie isn't eligible for an Oscar unless it plays in at least one theater- and I personally don't consider anything a "real movie" if it doesn't, though with the digital crap theaters are using now that may be less of an issue. With the Emmys, shows used to have to air on broadcast TV (not cable!) to qualify but that's gone away and even shows that premiere on Netflix are eligible for those now- which I think is kinda unfair as something on Netflix is obviously going to be able to have more creative freedom than something on ABC would have.
Old 10-05-14, 05:12 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Isn't it about time NF streaming added a NF channel
Old 10-05-14, 06:46 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by whotony
Isn't it about time NF streaming added a NF channel
That makes absolutely no sense.

Why would they run a streaming platform with pre-programming in place when their model is watch what you want, when you want?
Old 10-05-14, 06:47 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by My Other Self
That makes absolutely no sense.

Why would they run a streaming platform with pre-programming in place when their model is watch what you want, when you want?
What?

NF has enough programming that is produced by them that they could add a "channel" just for their programming.

Much like the comedy channel or the drama channel or popular on FB channel that is there now.

If I said category would you get what I'm saying then?
Old 10-05-14, 06:52 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

I'd actually like the option to randomly-play everything on Netflix for eternity, until I tell it to do otherwise. I can have it play a few episodes of the same show in order, but after a few it stops to ask "are you still watching?" (Thankfully I don't have one of the higher-tech interfaces where they break into the end credits to tell you what you should watch next.)
Old 10-05-14, 06:53 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by whotony
What?

NF has enough programming that is produced by them that they could add a "channel" just for their programming.

Much like the comedy channel or the drama channel that is there now.
It's not that confusing. You just now added "channel" in quotes.

Your initial post made it sound like you're wondering why don't they have some standard channel with programming in place on a timed schedule.
Originally Posted by whotony
If I said category would you get what I'm saying then?
If you said category your post would have made more sense.
Old 10-05-14, 06:53 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Whoa. I just watched Blended. What an awkwardly shot and edited film. Everyone was too excited to get back to the African resort and didn't want to work on the f'n movie. I think every shot was done on the first take.

I feel like Coraci and Sandler were trolling to see who would finance their vacation and who would pay to see the bi-product of their vacation.

I like Sandler's movies for what they are. Zohan was his last really good one. They were really stretching it with Blended.

I hope that his future movies aren't so lazy.
Old 10-05-14, 06:55 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by Troy Stiffler
I hope that his future movies aren't so lazy.
Yeah, I wouldn't count on it. He's on record stating that he chooses scripts based on their shooting locale so he can get a free vacation out of it.
Old 10-05-14, 06:56 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by My Other Self
It's not that confusing. You just now added "channel" in quotes.

Your initial post made it sound like you're wondering why don't they have some standard channel with programming in place on a timed schedule.
If you said category your post would have made more sense.
What other way could channel be interpreted for programming on Netflix?
Old 10-05-14, 07:02 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by whotony
What other way could channel be interpreted for programming on Netflix?
Like the WWE Network, which is a streaming channel, on a scheduled system with programming already set in place.

If Netflix had the "Netflix Channel" as you so suggest, and I turn it on, I will fully expect to have programming already in place.

Which makes no fucking sense based off of the Netflix business model.
Old 10-05-14, 07:12 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by My Other Self
Like the WWE Network, which is a streaming channel, on a scheduled system with programming already set in place.

If Netflix had the "Netflix Channel" as you so suggest, and I turn it on, I will fully expect to have programming already in place.

Which makes no fucking sense based off of the Netflix business model.
Exactly, Netflix is for all intents and purposes a video on demand hub. You can't really call them a "channel" like an HBO or Showtime even though they are producing the Sandler movies and many originals. People who are paying for it are watching their material on their own time and pace. Plus, all their content eventually has an expiration date.
Old 10-05-14, 07:15 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Well that is an other way.

I will try to be more specific in future posts.

But I would like to turn on NF and see a .... list of all their programming separate from the non NF programming.
Old 10-05-14, 10:24 PM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by DJariya
Plus, all their content eventually has an expiration date.
I would buy a Netflix Box with built in hard drive. If a show has an expiration date, they can give you the option of owning the series forever.
Old 10-05-14, 11:16 PM
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I'd assume their original programming isn't something they plan on taking down anytime soon. Unlike, say, BSG.
Old 10-06-14, 12:28 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

He's on record stating that he chooses scripts based on their shooting locale so he can get a free vacation out of it.
So I guess he won't be doing any movies in Detroit soon?
Old 10-06-14, 02:24 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by Alan Smithee
Good question, as typically a movie isn't eligible for an Oscar unless it plays in at least one theater- and I personally don't consider anything a "real movie" if it doesn't, ....
That's.....weird.
Old 10-06-14, 09:29 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by DJariya
Exactly, Netflix is for all intents and purposes a video on demand hub. You can't really call them a "channel" like an HBO or Showtime even though they are producing the Sandler movies and many originals. People who are paying for it are watching their material on their own time and pace. Plus, all their content eventually has an expiration date.
With exception of these Sandler movies and their other original content. This is true for all "premium" channels, it's the same reason HBO / Cinemax run their material for a period of maybe 6 months and then cycle them out with different movies. Or at least did.

Though HBO has become more about being an On Demand service lately too.
Old 10-06-14, 09:35 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

I haven't seen any indication that NF produced content will be "expiring".
Old 10-06-14, 09:51 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by whotony
I haven't seen any indication that NF produced content will be "expiring".
"Orange is the New Black Season 2, now available exclusively at Red Box!"
Old 10-06-14, 10:01 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Speaking of Red Box their own streaming service is being shut down at the end of this month or next.
Old 10-06-14, 10:27 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

Originally Posted by whotony
Speaking of Red Box their own streaming service is being shut down at the end of this month or next.
Tomorrow actually
Old 10-06-14, 10:44 AM
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re: The Adam Sandler / Happy Madison / Netflix Thread

This might just be a very smart move on Sandler's part. He is now 48 years old, and I wonder how much longer he'll be popular, especially with young people. Getting 4 films in the pipeline is not a bad idea.

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