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Film Festival Experiences

Old 09-07-12, 01:30 PM
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Film Festival Experiences

I saw some older threads after searching, but wanted to start something fresh given the season.

Have any of you (non-press) ever gone to one of the bigger film festivals (Cannes, TIFF, etc.)? What was your experience like? Was it worth the trip? Were you able to see any of the films you wanted? Are some of the less prestigious festivals a better bet?

The Tribeca Film Festival is near me every year. I went to the website this past year to check out what was playing and seemed nearly impossible for the average person to get tickets to some of bigger titles without dedication.
Old 09-07-12, 01:40 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

from what I understand it 'the public' is largely absent from Cannes screenings, it's almost ALL industry/press.

I've had a couple of friends who went to TIFF, it's a lot of line standing... and waiting.
Old 09-07-12, 02:13 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

These things only sound fun if you're an insider.

I've gone to Screamfest in LA once or twice for a screening. That was pretty smooth, and fun.
Old 09-07-12, 02:21 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Originally Posted by KillerCannibal View Post
These things only sound fun if you're an insider.
This.

If you're not:
  • Involved with a film playing at the festival.
  • With the organizations running the festival.
  • With the media.
  • With the press.
The festivals aren't as fun as they should be. Granted, this can't be said about all festivals. However, as a "VIP" for CineVegas three years running, it was a pain in the ass to get into films because it usually involved you waiting in a line for an hour or two to get into a film. The festival was more about drinking and socializing at the after parties than it was about the films themselves. Which would make sense considering I saw a lot of shit at CineVegas.

However, I got to eat a Philly cheese steak with Sylvester Stallone due to CineVegas. So that was cool based upon the weirdness factor alone.
Old 09-07-12, 03:30 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I've gone to Toronto 5 or 6 times and have always had a nice time. I go for the full festival and try to see 4-5 movies a day. I buy all my tickets in advance and if you plan it well it's not too difficult to get around.

I also go to the Cleveland Film Festival in March most years. It is nice because it is all at one location with 8 screens or so. The theater is a little run-down but it is attached to a large mall with hotel rooms so once you are at the festival there is no need to leave.
Old 09-08-12, 10:33 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I've gone to TIFF a few times and it's great - a lot of waiting around but well worth it. In the last 3 days, I saw Jason Reitman's Live Read of American Beauty, where I got to meet/get autographs from BRYAN CRANSTON & Christina Hendricks. I then was front and centre for the ON THE ROAD red carpet, met/autographs from Garrett Hedlund and Kristen Stewart.

I bumped into Marion Cotillard on the street and got a pic and autograph. I met Kristen Wiig and Darren Criss. Saw the North American premiere of SPRING BREAKERS, with cast in attendance (got to say a quick hello to James Franco).

I then just missed seeing Paul Thomas Anderson but met In Bruges director Martin McDonagh. Then at the world premiere of SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS last night, I was sitting in front of the entire cast. Shook most of their hands and ran into CLARK GREGG in the audience, got an autograph. Awesome movie.

Then today saw another WORLD PREMIERE, Joss Whedon's MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, where I got to meet Tom Lenk, Alexis Denisof, Fran Kranz, Reed Diamond, Sean Maher and Amy Acker. I had a short run in with NATHAN FILLION but couldn't get anything signed. The movie was fantastic and the atmosphere in the room was incredible.

After that I saw Bradley Cooper and got an autograph.

I think it depends on the festival, I just got my tickets when single tickets went onsale a few days ago...now granted there was a handful of films I got completely shut out of, but all in all, I had a great weekend and think if you can take the lines and waiting around, it is a great experience here at TIFF. A lot of fun.
Old 09-08-12, 10:41 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

TIFF is a blast for non-insiders. I'd love to go again...
The bigger ones like Cannes would be phenomenal... but as others said, it seems nearly impossible for "normal people" to attend.
I'm going to see 6 films at CIFF this year, and I'm pretty excited. It's nowhere near the event that TIFF is, but it's also a lot younger. They've got a lot of passion, just not enough "big exclusives," which is incredibly hard for them, since there's only a week gap between TIFF and CIFF. It'll be awesome to see Antiviral with Brandon Cronenberg in attendance.

edited to add: If there were assigned seating at any of these festivals, I'd pay double. I know TIFF didn't have assigned seating in 2005, and CIFF doesn't have assigned seating... but seriously... that'd be awesome. Far less waiting/standing.

Last edited by Dan; 09-08-12 at 10:48 PM.
Old 09-09-12, 05:05 AM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I went to the Sydney Film Festival this year and it was a lot of fun. I've been to TIFF (or rather, was in Toronto while TIFF was happening), NYFF, and a few minor ones.

For me, watching a good movie is more fun than meeting a celebrity, so you may need to recalibrate your idea of what fun is. I had a lot more fun seeing Che early than seeing Soderbergh and Del Toro on the red carpet.

I think it would also be interesting to get perspectives on people that have attended as filmmakers, as festival staff, as studio staff, etc.
Old 09-09-12, 09:11 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I've been to the Karlvy Vary Intl Film Festival in the Czech Republic as a spectator. It was magnificent. They had an Ozu retrospective that year and I caught as many as I could. Saw Van Sant's Elephant at a premiere with the director in attendance.. Tons of other wonderful films. This was 2003, im dyng to go back...
Old 09-09-12, 10:45 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

How much do the movie tickets at TIFF cost?
Old 09-09-12, 10:53 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Originally Posted by mdc3000 View Post
I've gone to TIFF a few times and it's great - a lot of waiting around but well worth it. In the last 3 days, I saw Jason Reitman's Live Read of American Beauty, where I got to meet/get autographs from BRYAN CRANSTON & Christina Hendricks. I then was front and centre for the ON THE ROAD red carpet, met/autographs from Garrett Hedlund and Kristen Stewart.

I bumped into Marion Cotillard on the street and got a pic and autograph. I met Kristen Wiig and Darren Criss. Saw the North American premiere of SPRING BREAKERS, with cast in attendance (got to say a quick hello to James Franco).

I then just missed seeing Paul Thomas Anderson but met In Bruges director Martin McDonagh. Then at the world premiere of SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS last night, I was sitting in front of the entire cast. Shook most of their hands and ran into CLARK GREGG in the audience, got an autograph. Awesome movie.

Then today saw another WORLD PREMIERE, Joss Whedon's MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, where I got to meet Tom Lenk, Alexis Denisof, Fran Kranz, Reed Diamond, Sean Maher and Amy Acker. I had a short run in with NATHAN FILLION but couldn't get anything signed. The movie was fantastic and the atmosphere in the room was incredible.

After that I saw Bradley Cooper and got an autograph.

I think it depends on the festival, I just got my tickets when single tickets went onsale a few days ago...now granted there was a handful of films I got completely shut out of, but all in all, I had a great weekend and think if you can take the lines and waiting around, it is a great experience here at TIFF. A lot of fun.
i didn't realize it be possible to get tickets for world/north american premieres, or for fans to be on or near the red carpet.

Also i'm w gp1086, how much are tickets for the big movies?
Old 09-10-12, 12:07 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

At TIFF, most regular screenings are $20. Galas and premieres are usually more... a friend paid $40 to get into Spring Breakers. If you plan in advance and order a ticket pack, I think it's a bit cheaper, but not much.
Old 09-10-12, 05:31 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I spent about $325 on a 30-ticket pack for the Sydney Film Festival, and another $50 or so for the Closing Gala and Gangs of Wasseypur tickets.

My recommendation would be to research which films are likely to be released in short order. No sense in wasting festival time in seeing a movie already scheduled to be playing in your arthouse theater in two months.
Old 09-11-12, 06:59 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

$40 a ticket... F that unless I'm getting an intro from the director and actors or something.
Old 09-12-12, 02:27 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Yeah, the $40 screenings usually have intros, Q&As, etc.
Even the $20 ones have that pretty often, from what I remember when I went to TIFF.
Old 09-12-12, 03:20 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I would say in my experience at Toronto that 95% of first time showing of movies have directors/stars/etc and 75% of further showings will have guests in attendance.

I've seen some pretty amazing Q&As over the years. Perhaps my favorite was a showing of "For Your Consideration" with the entire cast on stage.
Old 09-12-12, 06:30 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Saw the new Robert Redford flick THE COMPANY YOU KEEP. It was fine, good acting and is an engaging story but I thought the pacing was off - needed a bit more sizzle. Redford did a short introduction but no Q&A and no other cast members on stage - bullshit.

Did another full day at TIFF on Monday. Saw THANKS FOR SHARING - starring Gwyneth, Mark Ruffalo and Tim Robbins. It was really well done, a Terms of Endearment/James L. Brooks vibe going on - hilarious, dark and disturbing in parts. The director, Stuart Blumberg did a great Q&A. Well worth seeing.

WRITERS starring Greg Kinnear, Lily Collins and Jennifer Connelly - this felt like a vintage Cameron Crowe flick - I loved almost everything about it, even if it did veer off into melodrama territory a few times, but they pull it back and it has some really smart humour in it. The director Josh Boone, newcomer Nat Wolff and Greg Kinnear were on-hand for a Q&A. Really great, Josh told us the Stephen King stuff in the movie was based on something that actually happened to him - can't wait to see this one again, Lily Collins was excellent.

Then I saw the North American premiere of Malick's TO THE WONDER. It has all his visual trademarks, sunsets/movement etc. lots of good poetic narration but the story and some elements never really feel like much of anything. I read a quote where someone said this was for people who though Tree of Life was "Too coherent and too linear", which is probably accurate. Hardly any dialogue, but good visuals and evokes a mood...I have no idea the significance of the Javier Bardem stuff, but I enjoyed it anyhow - not GREAT but acceptable. Rachel McAdams and Olga Kurylenko were in attendance as well as Malick's Wife, but not the man himself.

Finished the day off with THE ICEMAN. Director Ariel Vrooman, Chris Evans, Michael Shannon, Ray Liota, Winona Ryder and more were in attendance. The film was fine, but nothing exceptional beyond Shannons great performance...felt the pacing was off on this one too but overall it had some good moments. Met Gerard Butler who was just there seeing the film, as well as most of the cast after the Q&A.
Old 09-12-12, 09:24 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Thanks for the feedback, mdc3000!

How difficult was it to get tickets? Were the prices this year consistent with what others have mentioned in this thread?
Old 09-16-12, 12:04 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

I've been going to TIFF for years. They pride themselves on their accessibility to the public for their screenings. Yes, there is a fair amount of lining up to pick up your tickets, get into the venues, and stand in the rush lines for those who don't have tickets but that's how they roll. Lots of directors and celebs are all over the place attending premieres, press conferences, and just walking around. Halle Berry and her kid walked past me on the sidewalk and a few minutes later, I was walking in front of Dustin Hoffman. The director and cast will generally attend at least the first screening of their movie and most of them will have a Q&A afterwards. The premium priced gala premieres at Roy Thomson Hall will have an intro but no Q&A. I saw the following at TIFF this year:

The Last Supper. Chinese costume drama set about 2200 years ago about the fall of a dynasty and the rise of another, with three men plotting and scheming against each other to become Emperor. I thought it was really boring and ponderous.

No One Lives. Horror film from the director of Versus and Midnight Meat Train about a group of vicious criminals who abduct a couple who turn out not to be as innocent as they appear. This was a lot of fun and the crowd I was with had a blast. The director was there for a Q&A afterwards.

Hyde Park on Hudson. Bill Murray as FDR and Laura Linney as his distant cousin Daisy whom he has an affair with. Most of the movie is set during a weekend when the King & Queen of England (the same royal couple we saw in The King's Speech last year) visit FDR at his summer home in the hopes of gaining the Americans' support in the forthcoming WWII. Light drama and very well done. Bill Murray has a shot at an Oscar nom IMO.

Imogene. Kristen Wiig and Annette Bening as a dysfunctional daughter and mom. Dark comedy about a woman who fakes her suicide to get her boyfriend back but ends up in the custodial care of her whacked-out mom. I liked it but I didn't think it achieved a proper balance between the comedy and drama.

Greetings From Tim Buckley. Penn Badgely from Gossip Girl stars as singer Jeff Buckley, who must deal with the demons of his non-relationship with his late father, singer Tim Buckley, as he prepares for a tribute concert for his father. Snoozeville, although the singing (actually performed by the actors) is well done.

Rebelle. About a female child soldier in the Congo and the hellish circumstances she must deal with. Very powerful and disturbing.

Dangerous Liaisons. Chinese adaptation of the famous 18th century French novel, of which the 1988 version starring Glenn Close, John Malkovich, and Michelle Pfeiffer is most well-known. Cecilia Cheung is in Close's role and Zhang Ziyi is in Pfeiffer's role, now set in decadent 1930s Shanghai. Excellent film but not quite up to the 1988 version.
Old 09-16-12, 01:42 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

This year is my 15th consecutive year going to TIFF. I actually book a week's vacation in order to attend. I've seen 14 movies so far this year, with one more to hit tonight. Last year I peaked with 20 screenings, but that actually started to feel like work and screening delays caused problems, so I scaled back this year.

Anyone calling TIFF a difficult experience has either never been to it (and is coming by that info secondhand) or did not plan ahead and "do" the festival properly. You can't treat it offhandedly or you'll increase your odds of disappointment.

TIFF tickets go on sale in early August. That's when you should buy them.

TIFF ticket "packages" are the best deals. The most popular one for years running was the 10-ticket "flex" pack. You could buy multiples of these if you wanted, or just get one and add a few singles. Thankfully, they augmented the "flex packs" this year to included incremental packages of 20, 30, 40, etc. The higher the number of tickets, the cheaper the per-ticket cost.

Individual tickets are $19.69 + $1.00 (service charge) + Tax = $23.48 per ticket.
10-ticket Flex Pack works out to $192.10 CDN with service charge + tax, so about $19.20 per ticket.

You can see the package prices here. Hovering above each package name shows it prices, although you can't click through on most of them anymore since the festival ends today:
http://tiff.net/thefestival/tickets/packages

Now here's some critical information: TIFF screenings NEVER SELL OUT.

I don't know the game behind this, but in those 15 years of attending, I've NEVER, EVER sat in a completely packed house, and this year was no exception. Oh, they can get quite full, but they never completely fill up. The problem for newcomers is that they get discouraged by the "off sale" notices that go up on the website and on the film schedules posted on easels at the venues. This means that your (usually) final option is to go stand in the Rush Lines. TIFF staffers will tell you this as if your chance are slim, which I think is ridiculous because RUSH LINES ALWAYS GET IN. Always. This is because there is always room, and rush lines are rarely very long because, well, people have been conned into thinking there's no point in standing in them because they may not get in. You may not get the best seats, or maybe your group of friends will have to sit apart (maybe, but not likely), but you'll get in, and in most of the TIFF venues, there are few bad seats beyond the first two or three rows (and even those can be tolerable, depending on the layout of the venue and the amount of "shaky-cam" in the film).

This year, I also discovered TIFF staffers giving away free tickets to people in Rush Lines at at least three Midnight Madness screenings (don't know if this has been going on elsewhere). I didn't quite realize what was going on until the third time around, when I was loitering around the Ryserson Theatre (home to Midnight Madness) after seeing a 9 pm show there, deciding whether to stay for the Midnight show or go home. When I got close to the rush line, a couple of volunteers asked me if I wanted a ticket (for COME OUT AND PLAY). Tough to resist that, even though I already had a ticket to the Saturday screening of that show (which I swapped just yesterday for a ticket to Ben Wheatley's SIGHTSEERS, which is now my final fest film tonight).

I'm a little peeved about the free tickets, though. It's kind of insulting to see them doing that when everybody else in line has paid full price, sometimes weeks in advance. Hell, even I paid full price for that particular show, only on a different day! Thankfully, being able to exchange my sudden duplicate meant I was one-up on screenings overall, so I can't complain too much.

Also, for the past two festivals, TIFF has been pairing up with WagJag (a Canada-only version of Groupon) to offer half-price tickets mid-way through the festival. No limits, either. This is nice, but it does tend to make screenings in the back half of the festival a bit more crowded than usual, though still never completely full. It also leaves a lot of inexperienced fest-goers SOL because they decide to come downtown and redeem their WagJag vouchers shortly before showtime, only to discover that most of that day's screenings have "gone rush" hours earlier. If you're able to get a WagJag (or several) midway through next year's fest, redeem them online immediately.

As for the lineups, I stopped standing in them years ago.

Lineups to purchase tickets can easily be avoided if you just pre-order your tickets in August when they first go on sale. TIFF overhauled their online ordering system this year and it works considerably better than it ever did in the past. Premium and/or buzzed-about stuff still goes "off-sale" (but not really) fairly quickly, while the vast majority of screenings are easy to get tickets to. You just need to have your selections written down before you order, as the site provides a 30 minute window once you add the first selection to your cart.

As for lineups at the venues themselves, I also stopped standing in these years ago as well. I don't like the cattle mentality (nor the volunteers who treat the guests like herders). I usually show up about five to ten minutes before the screening, go in last (but before the rush lines, generally), and still find a decent seat (or seats, when my girlfriend joins me a couple of times each year).

One nice benefit of this is at Midnight Madness screenings. It's chilly up here in September sometimes, and rather than sit in a lineup that invariably stretches three-quarters of the way around the block from the theatre — outside! — I just wait near the entrance, which is also where the red carpet happens to be. Midnight Madness shows never seem to draw that many star-gazers and autograph hounds, so if you kill time near the entrance, you can get great views of the arriving dignitaries (lol), then pop inside the Ryerson University building -- which is right there — and stay toasty warm while every one else shivers around the block. The Ryerson Theatre holds something like 1200 or 1500 people and like all other festival venues, it never sells out. Best views are up in the balcony, which often sit half-occupied because the seals make beelines for the main floor. Guess they like having heads block their view of the screen.

Futher to this, I try to shoot the intros and Q&As for all the movies I attend (http://www.youtube.com/user/Coolestmovies). I figure these might come in handy some day when I'm an old fart with a fading memory. My videos probably aren't the best, but they're often the most complete versions on YouTube because I don't shoot them from my seat. I shoot them from the back or side of the theatre if possible (especially at the Ryerson), and even after all that, I still get a good seat!

As Defiant1 notes, you're bound to see directors, producers, writers and cast members at or near these things, but generally only at first or second screenings of a given film. Most films are screened three times, but by the third time, the "talent" has usually gone home. Sadly, ticket prices for ALL screenings are the same ($20 for regulars, $40 for premiums), but only the first two (and sometimes only the first) come with the bells and whistles. Also, some actors and directors can be very generous with their time, chatting with audience members just outside the theatre after the screening and Q&A, depending on how rigid their PR flacks are feeling that day.

I go to TIFF for the films (and occasionally the directors), and rarely the "celebrities" and all that they entail. But, to each his own.

So to the original OP, I strongly recommend TIFF if you can make it. But come for the week, and buy your tickets before you get here.

And, since others are posting what they've seen, here's what I've seen:

DREDD 3D (South Africa; Pete Travis) 7/10
NO ONE LIVES (USA; Ryuhei Kitamura) 7/10
BERBERIAN SOUND STUDIO (Britain; Peter Strickland) 7/10
THE COLOR OF THE CHAMELEON (Bulgaria; Emil Hristow) 6/10
THE LORDS OF SALEM (USA; Rob Zombie) 5/10
TAI CHI ZERO (Hong Kong/China; Stephen Fung) 7/10
HERE COMES THE DEVIL (Mexico/USA; Adrián García Bogliano) 6/10
COMRADE KIM GOES FLYING (North Korea; Nicholas Bonner, Anja Daelemans, Kim Gwang-hun) 7/10
THE SUICIDE SHOP (France/Canada; Patrice Leconte) 8/10
COME OUT AND PLAY (Mexico; Makinov) 6/10
THE THIEVES (South Korea; Choi Dong-hoon) 8/10
7 BOXES (Paraguay; Juan Carlos Maneglia, Tana Schembori) 9/10
HELLBENDERS (USA; J.T. Petty) 6/10
JOHN DIES AT THE END (USA; Don Coscarelli) 7/10
SIGHTSEERS (Britain; Ben Wheatley) 9/10

Last edited by Brian T; 09-16-12 at 10:43 PM.
Old 09-16-12, 04:00 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Brian: Are the empty seats for studio/talent and press that doesn't show up?
Old 09-16-12, 05:38 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Originally Posted by The Bus View Post
Brian: Are the empty seats for studio/talent and press that doesn't show up?
There are seats at every screening reserved for VIPs (people involved with the film, the studio, sponsors, donors, etc.). The galas at Roy Thomson Hall basically have the entire orchestra level reserved for these VIPs. If they don't show up, they're free for the general public to take.

I don't like the cattle mentality (nor the volunteers who treat the guests like herders)
As a TIFF volunteer, we have to deal with all sorts of people and have to maintain some semblance of order. The majority of people are very nice but there are some real idiots and assholes out there who can make our shifts very trying. As often stated, TIFF would simply not exist without its volunteers.
Old 09-16-12, 11:58 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Originally Posted by The Bus View Post
Brian: Are the empty seats for studio/talent and press that doesn't show up?
Originally Posted by Defiant1 View Post
There are seats at every screening reserved for VIPs (people involved with the film, the studio, sponsors, donors, etc.). The galas at Roy Thomson Hall basically have the entire orchestra level reserved for these VIPs. If they don't show up, they're free for the general public to take.
While generally true, and probably even TIFF policy, I have witnessed rare occasions where those VIP seats have sat empty for entire screenings, and "regular" visitors asking about them have been rebuffed, sometimes quite rudely, as if they were children, and sent down to the front row wasteland, which brings me to . . .

Originally Posted by Defiant1 View Post
As a TIFF volunteer, we have to deal with all sorts of people and have to maintain some semblance of order. The majority of people are very nice but there are some real idiots and assholes out there who can make our shifts very trying. As often stated, TIFF would simply not exist without its volunteers.
Interesting revelation there. So were your seven screenings on the house? If so, that's not a bad form of remuneration for putting up with the bozos in the crowd.

Regardless, when it comes to the volunteers, I wholeheartedly agree the festival wouldn't be the same without 'em. My own experience with TIFF volunteers has been, give or take, 95% wonderful, 5% questionable, so I'm not painting everyone with the same brush here. But I'd love to see that 5% reduced closer to zero. The vast majority of volunteers — who it should be noted here run the gamuts of age, ethnicity and even disability! — are phenomenal in dealing with and/or helping the public with patience, grace and most importantly, infectious smiles (especially the cute girls). But there are a few folks whose performances should be monitored in action, or who should at least be told to keep their bitter mutterings and condescending manner to themselves no matter how many idiots and assholes come their way, at least until all paying customers are out of earshot.

As a paying customer, I've had to deal with a handful of idiots and assholes volnteering for the festival over the past fifteen years. They are exceptions, not the rule, but a precious few of them get a headset and seem to think they're AD's hustling extras on a movie set (thus my "cattle" comment) rather than guests paying nearly double the going rate to see a picture (including for screenings without intros and Q&As). Donating one's time is no reason to treat everyone like children just because, inevitably, some of the guests deserve it. (and believe me, I'm well aware that some people deserve it — and much worse — especially in the Midnight crowds). It's like any "service" job," even though you're not paid for it; you're supposed to make all guests feel welcome, happy, even excited, not make them feel like juveniles because a few bad apples have earned your disdain, or because one guest asks you the same "dumb" question already asked by three other people, or because they don't proceed in satisfactory quantities through the second doorway you tell them is available to speed up the process (and you certainly shouldn't smarmily faint-applaud those who do!). Nothing personal, but I don't want to see that you're having a bad day. Nearly all TIFF volunteers seem to understand this, but there's invariably a few who wear their hostility on their sleeves. I don't care how trying a volunteer's shift is; I don't want my experience to be likewise trying because of it. That's not what I paid for. Thankfully, as I've said, these are rare exceptions, and I wouldn't be surprised if similar situations exist at every film festival out there. It's a black eye no matter where it happens.

In the end, though, it comes down to this: film festivals are not without issues that drive volunteers, employees and paying audience members into barely-concealable rages. After all, the logistics of such an endeavour are staggering. But after everyone's in their seats, the volunteers and staff have uncoiled, the intros are over, the lights go down, the cel phones go off, and the year's irritating sponsor commercial unspools for the umpteenth time, that's when the experience becomes magic . . .

And that's why everyone here needs to try it at least once.


Last edited by Brian T; 09-17-12 at 12:06 AM.
Old 09-17-12, 09:49 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Oh, I'll fully agree that there are some volunteers (thankfully in the minority) who take whatever little power they have and go into full asshole mode. You'll never get 100% satisfaction on either side of the fence. The people with the headsets do have a pretty tough job as there are usually a dozen conversations going on in their ears simultaneously that Bradley Cooper only wants Perrier and not Dasani, a sponsor wants 4 seats instead of 2, Halle Berry wants seats even though she isn't even in the movie, 50 people are in the rush line whille there are just 30 seats available, the previous screening ran late and now the next screening will be pushed back, 1000 ticket holders are standing in the rain complaining, the volunteers on the red carpet barricades are getting harassed by overzealous fans, and so on and so on. It's a miracle of logistics that the festival runs relatively smoothly! You don't want to hear about the horror story that happened one year when Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, and Ryan Gosling had back-to-back red carpet premieres.

And yes, we get vouchers for free screenings as reward for our hard work. A nice perk.
Old 09-17-12, 11:49 PM
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re: Film Festival Experiences

Great information, all. Thanks!

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