Movie Talk A Discussion area for everything movie related including films In The Theaters

Mothers unite in fight against movie theaters...

Old 04-21-06, 01:20 AM
  #1  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6,032
Mothers unite in fight against movie theaters...

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/c...ck=1&cset=true

Mothers unite in fight against movie theaters


Published April 14, 2006


Then Wendee met Kristen, and the plot heated up.

Wendee Goles is a Villa Park artist and mother frustrated by parents who tote their toddlers to movies filled with killing, copulating and other R-rated amusements she thinks should be reserved for adult eyes only.

After I wrote about her a few weeks ago, she was swamped with e-mail urging her on. She went on WLS and WGN radio.

Though she doesn't consider herself religious, Mark Moring, managing editor of Christianity Today Movies, wrote a column on her cause and received what he called "a ton" of supportive reader responses.

Meanwhile, out in Bozeman, Montana ...

One night recently, Kristen Montgomery went to see "The Hills Have Eyes." Like Goles, she is 35, a mother, a college graduate, more liberal than not, and, like Goles, she is convinced that taking a child to a gory or sexually raw movie is child abuse as surely as kicking a kid in the grocery store.

She'd gone to the film that night expecting to be grossed out. But she didn't expect the thing that really disgusted her--kids of 4, 5, and 6 watching blood, guts and guns light up the screen in the dark theater.

"Mommy, can we leave yet?" wailed the boy behind her, to a mother who kept telling him to shush. "Mommy, I don't like this movie."

Montgomery stalked out of the movie in tears and complained to a theater manager who, as she recalls, nonchalantly said, "Look, we try to warn these parents, and the response is: `Mind your own business.'"


That very night, Montgomery made it her business by firing off a letter to the National Association of Theatre Owners. Someone there faxed her back a copy of the column on Goles.

Before long, a team was born.

Now Goles and Montgomery talk and e-mail frequently, trading ideas on how to spread their concern.

Both have posted statements on www.boxofficeoffenders.com, the small Web site Goles established to manage the response to her fledgling campaign.

"I'm online constantly," Montgomery said, "on the phone, writing letters, researching. This has become a job for me."

Half a continent away, Goles has repeatedly called Oprah. She dreams of getting on "The View." She keeps trying to reach Sen. Dick Durbin.


"I know he's a very busy man," she said. "But I just want to say, `Hey, I went to school with your daughter [at the School of the Art Institute]. Give me a call!'"

Neither Goles nor Montgomery is wild about the government intruding on the movies or any art. They'd prefer to have theater owners enforce rules.

They'd also like to educate parents on the psychological risks of inflicting R-rated images and loud, scary sounds on children too young to process the difference between movies and life.


They've snared the attention of John Fithian, president of the theater owners association.

"I agree with Wendee that there is an issue here," he said by phone from his Washington office. "Young children really can't process the difference between fantasy and reality. R-rated movies can be an upsetting experience. And when they get upset, they can create problems for the rest of the audience."

Theater owners are hearing more and more such complaints, he said. Some have created child-care centers, but many can't afford to. Some have barred young kids from R-rated movies, but many are reluctant to do so because parents have sued for discrimination when their kids are kept out.

Those cases have been settled out of court, he said, but the threat of lawsuits looms.

"It's an expensive proposition to us," Fithian said. "But we may have to get to the point that we take that cost."

Goles and Montgomery will keep pushing. They'd like to find one Wendee, one Kristen in every state, one person willing to rally support for the cause.

In the meantime, they juggle their new activism with the rest of life.

"I'm sorry," Goles said at one point as we talked Thursday. "My son just threw up all over me."
Read this in my local paper a couple of days ago, the top of my head about came off because said paper what The Bozeman Daily Chronicle....this psycho lives in my fuckin' town!!

I can't believe this shit...she see's awful parents at a movie theater and she blames said theater and the MPAA?!?!?! I remember seeing 5 and 6 year old sitting through South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut and I thought to myself, "wow, what shitty parents".

I mention the MPAA because in the article from the local paper, she ragged on them because they're, basically, out of control. "An R-rated movie today is way worse than an R-rated movie of 30 years ago."
MartinBlank is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 02:06 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Todash
Posts: 808
I actually think movie theaters should refuse anyone taking children under a certain age into a R-Rated movie. Not just because of the movie themes but because it's a movie for adults and the theater is filled with "mature" people who want to enjoy a movie in peace. I myself would not subject a child to things I myself have a hard time watching. I mean if you can't get someone to watch your kids then stay home or do something more appropriate with them.
OwlAtHome is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 02:12 AM
  #3  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 1,149
I noticed recently that the theater I usually go to has set up a policy of not allowing children in R-rated movies even with their parents for some of the later showings. Not that this has directly affected me since I rarely go to non-matinee showings of any movie.

While I would be unlikely to take my kids to see a movie like "The Hills Have Eyes" or any other gory horror movie, I'm never a fan of people who get up on their pedastals and say "Hey, I know how to raise your kids better than you do." Sure, I may think that some parents suck as parents, but I believe in their unalienable right to suck as parents.
BigDan is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 02:48 AM
  #4  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: City of the lakers.. riots.. and drug dealing cops.. los(t) Angel(e)s. ca.
Posts: 54,199
Originally Posted by OwlAtHome
I actually think movie theaters should refuse anyone taking children under a certain age into a R-Rated movie. Not just because of the movie themes but because it's a movie for adults and the theater is filled with "mature" people who want to enjoy a movie in peace. I myself would not subject a child to things I myself have a hard time watching. I mean if you can't get someone to watch your kids then stay home or do something more appropriate with them.

That's the issue, who's to say what is appropriate for them to do? I mean, do you have an age limit, Parents can't bring anyone who is younger than 9 but need to be there and buy the ticket for anyone who isn't 17 for R rated films?

I'm not for folks bringing babies, but this all falls on the responsibility or lack of in the parents. They make the choice and it effects us all who go to the theater. It's a shit situation and that's why I mainly go to theaters that discourage such actions or during film times where they wouldn't bring small childern.
Jackskeleton is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 03:20 AM
  #5  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Sitting on a beach, earning 20%
Posts: 9,917
At my local, our district manager told us to stop our policy of refusing people with children under 6 years of age for R-rated films.

She was getting threats of lawsuits, saying the policy "unfairly targeted black people".

On what planet does that make sense?
DonnachaOne is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 05:33 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Michael Corvin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 56,734
Originally Posted by DonnachaOne
At my local, our district manager told us to stop our policy of refusing people with children under 6 years of age for R-rated films.

She was getting threats of lawsuits, saying the policy "unfairly targeted black people".

On what planet does that make sense?
You got me.

The fact is, this kid was bothered enough to make a disturbance and distraction for other theater goers. If the parent won't be responsible and act, someone else should for the $10 that I paid to watch the movie in silence.
Michael Corvin is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 06:40 AM
  #7  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
The Bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 54,814
Originally Posted by DonnachaOne
At my local, our district manager told us to stop our policy of refusing people with children under 6 years of age for R-rated films.

She was getting threats of lawsuits, saying the policy "unfairly targeted black people".

On what planet does that make sense?
Gary Coleman?
The Bus is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 08:09 AM
  #8  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Cromwell, CT
Posts: 5,494
She was getting threats of lawsuits, saying the policy "unfairly targeted black people".

Yep, "The Man" is still wronging them!.........
JaxComet is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 08:27 AM
  #9  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,320
Reminds me of an incident when I went to see House of 1000 Corpses. A lady walked in with her brood, ages ranging from infant to about 8 years old (5 kids total). They came in just before the first big shoot-out at the house. When all the blood and gore started flying, she disgustedly got up and told her kids they were leaving. I was 4 rows back and said "It's called House of 1000 Corpses, you stupid shit, did you expect a Disney movie?"

As to the issue of where the responsibility lies, theater or parent...

While I agree that it's primarily an issue of parental responsibility, the theater could do more also. Like throw people out when their brats start making noise. If a parent decides to bring little Billy to see "I'll Skullfuck your corpse and piss on your grave," that's their decision and it's not my place to dictate to them what they allow their child to see, just as it's not their place to tell me that my kid can't watch The Simpsons (yes, radical difference there, I know). However, once little Billy starts yammering on throughout the movie or starts running up and down the aisle because he's bored, that's when a theater employee needs to come in and throw the family out. No warnings, either. Just tell them to leave. Once word gets out that they will throw you out for letting your child disrupt the movie (and no refunds, either), I guarantee that the number of problems will go down.
MovieExchange is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 12:26 PM
  #10  
Needs to contact an admin about multiple accounts
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,830
Originally Posted by MovieExchange
I was 4 rows back and said "It's called House of 1000 Corpses, you stupid shit, did you expect a Disney movie?"
no you didn't. you just wish you had. it would take a special brand of asshole to escalate the level of distraction like this.
Cygnet74 is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 01:17 PM
  #11  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: City of the lakers.. riots.. and drug dealing cops.. los(t) Angel(e)s. ca.
Posts: 54,199
Yeah because asking someone to leave wont make a bigger distraction when the people who are clearly not caring make a bigger scene..

How do you really enforce it? You have theaters barely breaking even and staying afloat. You want them to create some sort of task force of people to sit in on every film to monitor it?
Jackskeleton is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 01:19 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Posts: 378
Originally Posted by MovieExchange
Reminds me of an incident when I went to see House of 1000 Corpses. A lady walked in with her brood, ages ranging from infant to about 8 years old (5 kids total). They came in just before the first big shoot-out at the house. When all the blood and gore started flying, she disgustedly got up and told her kids they were leaving. I was 4 rows back and said "It's called House of 1000 Corpses, you stupid shit, did you expect a Disney movie?"
The irony in this is too much for me to resist. You are criticizing a woman in a thread discussing parental responsibility and you quote yourself as cursing at her in front of her small children.

There is a special place in hell.
kcbrett5 is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 02:00 PM
  #13  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: The Illustrious State of Fugue
Posts: 6,257
Dang. I convinced my Mom, Niece and Nephew to go see Sky Captain. My Niece wanted to stay but my Nephew got scared (of the robots). He wasn't disruptive at all, just kind of shrinking into his seat. My Mom took him out to window shop while my Niece and I finished up the movie.
You never know what's gonna scare someone or disturb them at early ages. I feel that no matter what you believe is appropriate for your kid, if they communicate any fear or discomfort why in Hell would you put them through that? They're your kids! Aren't you supposed to have this instinct built in to protect them? When the garbage trucks roll around and my cat's running scared, I don't point and laugh. I don't bring her out of her safe place to the window to see the damn thing. That woman in the OP that ignored her kid's pleas needs counseling stat. Before she lets another monster grow into this world.
Kudama is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 03:07 PM
  #14  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 1,149
Originally Posted by Kudama
You never know what's gonna scare someone or disturb them at early ages. I feel that no matter what you believe is appropriate for your kid, if they communicate any fear or discomfort why in Hell would you put them through that?
Back in 1996, my sons (who were then 7 and 3 years-old) wanted to see "Mars Attacks!", I was concerned that the younger kid wouldn't like it, but I didn't think it would be anything harmful to him. So, I let them convince me to go.

While there, I was sitting between my sons and keeping an eye on the younger one to make sure he was entertained enough. He sat on the edge of his seat with a huge smile on his face the whole time.

At one point, I looked over to my 7 year-old son, only to find him covering his eyes and kind of cowering in the seat. I asked him what was wrong. As it turned out, the movie was freaking him out a little. It never would've occured to me in advance that the 7 year-old would have a problem with or be scared by that movie.
BigDan is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 04:36 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Springfield, VA
Posts: 765
Every kid is different. I have an eight year old and about two years ago he came by the family room when I was watching Final Destination and he saw one of the gruesome deaths. He thought it was cool. He's not bothered at all by that kind of stuff and I'm fairly certain that he's not marked for life. But what do I know. Maybe one day he'll be like little mike meyers and just go off.
John-In-VA is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 05:45 PM
  #16  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6,032
Originally Posted by DonnachaOne
At my local, our district manager told us to stop our policy of refusing people with children under 6 years of age for R-rated films.

She was getting threats of lawsuits, saying the policy "unfairly targeted black people".

On what planet does that make sense?
Sounds like that theater is being run like a plantation, and you know what I'm talking about.
MartinBlank is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 06:20 PM
  #17  
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 122,482
Will somebody please think of the children!!!!

I do find it pretty sad when parents haul their children to the theater to see films not suitable for children. However, there are far more important things to get one's panties in a bunch about.
Red Dog is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 07:48 PM
  #18  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
sauce07's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Centreville, VA
Posts: 6,315
I remember sitting in the theater to see Scary Movie 2 and a mother came in with like 8 kids ranging from 5-8. I was shocked, but that is her choice and i will make my choice as well.
sauce07 is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 07:54 PM
  #19  
Needs to contact an admin about multiple accounts
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,830
while we're sharing stories, i remember the time i went to see Natural Born Killers. in the row behind me a man was holding an infant that began to cry.... so this genius gives the child his fucking keys to play with. it worked. the baby stopped crying.
Cygnet74 is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 08:35 PM
  #20  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Posts: 21,879
I remember seeing parents with an infant at a showing of Saw II. Lost some respect for them. However, while I agree that it is their choice to bring the kids, it sure as hell isn't ours to have to sit through the crying and other B.S.
Dr. DVD is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 10:27 PM
  #21  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,320
Originally Posted by Cygnet74
no you didn't. you just wish you had. it would take a special brand of asshole to escalate the level of distraction like this.
Oh, I'm sorry, were you there in the theater? No? Are you psychic, and you can read my mind to decide that I'm lying? No? Then please shut the hell up, because you have no clue what you're talking about.

And to the person taking me to task for having the nerve to say "shit" in front of children, go back to the family channel. If this stupid bitch is bringing kids into a movie called "House of 1,000 Corpses," I think it's safe to say that they hear much worse in the course of the day.

Last edited by MovieExchange; 04-21-06 at 10:32 PM.
MovieExchange is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 10:32 PM
  #22  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,320
Originally Posted by Jackskeleton
Yeah because asking someone to leave wont make a bigger distraction when the people who are clearly not caring make a bigger scene..

How do you really enforce it? You have theaters barely breaking even and staying afloat. You want them to create some sort of task force of people to sit in on every film to monitor it?

You have a choice - a constant distraction through a 2 hour movie, or a slightly louder one for a couple minutes. Seems like an easy choice to me.

Did you ever stop to think that maybe, just maybe, the reason that theaters are having so many problems just breaking even right now is that so many of us are tired of the crap they let go on in there? Maybe more people would come back to the theater if they didn't have to put up with the trailer / ghetto trash and their brood of crotch droppings yammering on throughout the whole movie?
MovieExchange is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 10:36 PM
  #23  
Banned by request
 
Supermallet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Termite Terrace
Posts: 54,156
At the end of the day, it's all about money. Movie theaters want it. They're not about to go restricting parents who want to pay for a whole family to see any movie. And while one or two adults may see movies less, two adult tickets doesn't equal five child tickets. Do I wish we could ban kids under 17 from R-rated movies? Sure. And I don't even mean small kids. Teenagers are just as annoying. Then again, I would love every film I see to be a private screening, but you can't always get what you want.
Supermallet is offline  
Old 04-21-06, 10:52 PM
  #24  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: City of the lakers.. riots.. and drug dealing cops.. los(t) Angel(e)s. ca.
Posts: 54,199
Originally Posted by Dr. DVD
I remember seeing parents with an infant at a showing of Saw II. Lost some respect for them. However, while I agree that it is their choice to bring the kids, it sure as hell isn't ours to have to sit through the crying and other B.S.

Then you have the choice to not go to films when you suspect will be peak for that sort of thing. Avoid day showings or something. Much like these parents shouldn't expect the world to revolve around their need to not get a baby sitter, you shouldn't have to assume that the world should revolve around your specific desires.
Jackskeleton is offline  
Old 04-22-06, 01:34 AM
  #25  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Lower Beaver, Iowa
Posts: 10,522
Originally Posted by Jackskeleton
Then you have the choice to not go to films when you suspect will be peak for that sort of thing. Avoid day showings or something. Much like these parents shouldn't expect the world to revolve around their need to not get a baby sitter, you shouldn't have to assume that the world should revolve around your specific desires.
What exactly is the "peak" time for bringing screaming infants to an R-rated movie like "Saw II"? Is their a family-priced blood-and-gore matinee I'm not aware of?

And I strongly disagree with the idea that expecting there to be no crying infants at a hard-R horror movie qualifies as thinking the world revolves around you. Children aren't supposed to be there at all regardless of what showtime I picked. If I want to see "Ice Age 2" without a lot of kids, then yeah, I'll avoid the early shows on weekends and go to a later show.

It's the people who bring extremely young children into movies that are innapproriate for them who think the world revolves around them. They're going to see whatever movie they want to see, regardless of what effects that movie will have on their children, and regardless of what effect their screaming children will have on the 200 other paying customers in the theater. If they weren't self-centered assholes, they'd either pay for a baby-sitter or they's wait for the DVD.

These are the same fucktards I see feeding sugar and caffeine to their 3-year-olds at IHOP at 2 a.m. and can't understand why their kids are tired and cranky.
Mr. Salty is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.