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"C.R.A.Z.Y." - Best Foreign Film of 2005?

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"C.R.A.Z.Y." - Best Foreign Film of 2005?

Old 11-11-05, 05:39 PM
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"C.R.A.Z.Y." - Best Foreign Film of 2005?



It's already Canada's official entry at the Oscars and has been distributed in 50 countries. It also boasts one of the most enthusiastic ratings response on the IMDb (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0401085/ratings) and it's just been made available on DVD on Amazon. See: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0401085/combined

It's a coming-of-age story set in Quebec in the 60's, 70's and 80's in a suburban family of five boys. It's been variously acclaimed as the "Best Canadian Film ever" and the "Best Quebec Film of the past 20 years", which is not surprising as the best Canadian films are almost invariably from Québec.

I personally think it deserves all the accolades.

Last edited by baracine; 11-12-05 at 09:37 AM.
Old 11-12-05, 09:24 AM
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Official website, with trailers: http://concours.canoe.com/concours_crazy/en/index.html#
Old 11-12-05, 09:32 AM
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November 10, 2005 article from the "London Free Press" (Ontario):

U.S. goes C.R.A.Z.Y. for Quebec film
Thu, November 10, 2005

By Canadian Press

LOS ANGELES -- Canada's Oscar contender, the made-in-Quebec film C.R.A.Z.Y., premiered in the United States this week, and early indications suggest that Americans may go crazy for it, too.

When it opened to a packed house at the Arclight Theatre on Sunset Boulevard, the audience laughed at the funny bits and sat riveted for the not-so-funny moments -- showing once again that the tried-and-true topic of family dysfunction can go far.

"People have the same reaction here as in Venice, as in Toronto," said the film's producer, Pierre Even. "The audience was a little more reserved than, say, in Italy, but I think they loved the film."

The movie has been a hit in Quebec, and won best Canadian feature film at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

The soundtrack includes songs by David Bowie, Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones, painting a familiar backdrop for North Americans who grew up in the 1970s.

"The people I've talked to are amazed that we have the rights to the music," Even said.

The subject matter, which includes bedwetting, bickering, blame and substance abuse, helps the audience identify with the characters as well.

Spoiler:
C.R.A.Z.Y. stands for the first names of five brothers growing up in a Montreal suburb in the mid-'70s: Christian, Raymond, Antoine, Zachary and Yvan.
The film focuses on the life of the fourth brother, Zachary, the Z in crazy.

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/Today/Th...0/1300734.html

Last edited by baracine; 11-12-05 at 09:59 AM.
Old 11-12-05, 09:58 AM
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Longer version of same Canadian Press article on Yahoo! News Canada:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/cpress/20051..._u_s__launch_1

Canada's Oscar contender C.R.A.Z.Y. has premiere in Los Angeles
JIM HOLT
Wed Nov 9, 2:23 PM ET

LOS ANGELES (CP) - Canada's Oscar contender, the made-in-Quebec film C.R.A.Z.Y., premiered in the United States this week and early indications suggest that Americans may go crazy for it, too.


When it opened to a packed house at the Arclight Theatre on Sunset Boulevard, the audience laughed at the funny bits and sat riveted for the not-so-funny moments - showing once again that the tried-true topic of family dysfunction can go a long way. "People have the same reaction here as in Venice, as in Toronto," said the film's producer Pierre Even. "The audience was a little more reserved than, say, in Italy but I think they loved the film.

"There was a guy in Venice, a Spanish guy maybe 30 years old, he said 'That's my family. That's me and my brothers.' It's the same thing here. Someone told me it was so American. He felt this story could have been in Boston or Los Angeles. He felt there was something really American to the story."

The movie has been a hit in Quebec, and won best Canadian feature film at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

The soundtrack includes songs by David Bowie, Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones, painting a familiar backdrop for North Americans who grew up in the 1970s.

"The people I've talked to are amazed that we have the rights to the music," Even said. "The music is something that brings people to the film."

The subject matter, which includes bedwetting, bickering, blame and substance abuse, helps the audience identify with the characters as well.

Spoiler:
C.R.A.Z.Y. stands for the first names of five brothers growing up in a Montreal suburb in the mid-'70s: Christian, Raymond, Antoine, Zachary and Yvan.
The film focuses on the life journey of Zach Beaulieu, the Z in crazy and fourth brother.

Born on Christmas Day, Zach, 'the blessed one,' meanders from Christmas to Christmas through a minefield of tenuous tradition and paternal expectation, identifying more with strollers than hockey games, and more with British glam rock stars than his French Canadian peers at mass.

Director Jean-Marc Vallee, who wrote the screenplay with Francois Boulay, went to great lengths searching for actors who looked natural in the skin of their characters. It wasn't so much that acting school students need not apply, as it were, but that's how it turned out.

"I had a lot of questions about casting," Vallee said about the Q-A session with the audience after the film premiered on Monday night.

"I'm very meticulous when I choose an actor," he said. "I was choosing actors that were close to the characters, so that they didn't have to portray somebody extremely different to what they were."

Vallee said he auditioned thousands of young actors in Quebec.

"The guys I chose are all self-made actors. They didn't go to any acting schools and, you know what, I think unconsciously it showed when these guys come to an audition because they're not afraid to do nothing. And, that's what I was asking them - do nothing. Less is more. I was constantly telling them 'less is more.' You can do nothing and it's going to be amazing because this medium is magic."

"I've never been comfortable with method acting," said Marc-Andre Grondin, who plays Zach. "Something that's really important, that has to be on the set, is an amazing trust between the actors and the director. If the actor trusts the director and the director trusts the actor, it can make a really natural movie."

In keeping with a Canadian tradition in Los Angeles, Consul General Alain Dudoit hosted the film's major players at a luncheon Tuesday.

But they won't know if they'll be in the foreign film category at the 78th annual Academy Awards until Jan. 31, when Oscar nominations are unveiled. The awards ceremony will be held March 5.

Last year, the consulate hosted Montreal director Robert Lepage for his film Far Side of the Moon and, in 2003, hosted director Denys Arcand, who later won an Oscar for his film Barbarian Invasions.

Last edited by baracine; 11-12-05 at 10:09 AM.
Old 11-12-05, 10:04 AM
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Three contenders at the AFI International Film Festival:

http://www.indiewire.com/ots/2005/11...st_dispat.html

[excerpt]

Coming-of Age in Canada, With a Cool Soundtrack

Spanning twenty years in the life of a young man growing up in French speaking Canada, Jean-Marc Vallee's "C.R.A.Z.Y." surrounds his sexually confused main character (played by Marc Andre-Grondin) with an eclectic family, weaves in a notable soundtrack that ranges from Bowie to Patsy Cline, and unveils a compelling visual style. The AFI Fest competition film, still looking for a U.S. distribution deal, debuted at the Venice Film Festival in September before winning the award for best Canadian film at the Toronto International Film Festival. Producer Pierre Even is eyeing a U.S. deal but trying to find the right partner who can work with him to clear music rights for the soundtrack, an essential element of the sometimes emotional, crowd-pleasing new film.


"C.R.A.Z.Y." director Jean-Marc Vallee with producer Pierre Even at AFI Fest Tuesday. Photo by Brian Brooks/indieWIREDuring a Q & A session here at AFI Fest Tuesday, Vallee explained that he had specific music in mind when developing each character in the film, one likes Charles Aznavour and Buddy Rich, another listens to Pink Floyd and the Rolling Stones, while still another prefers mambo. While on the visual side, the filmmaker (who has directed a mix of TV and feature projects) explained that he sought to create something he'd be "happy to direct and watch."


"C.R.A.Z.Y." director Jean-Marc Vallee with producer Pierre Even at AFI Fest Tuesday. Photo by Brian Brooks/indieWIRE


The film, Canada's submission for the coveted foreign language Oscar, is based on true stories from the life of co-writer Francois Boulay, himself from a family of brothers. The main character, unable to deal with his own sexual orientation, faces challenges in dealing with his father and struggles in the relationship he has with his older brother who has an increasing drug problem. "Zac, our main character, feels different, but he doesn't want to be different, because he fears that he would lose the thing that is most important to him -- the love of his father," Vallee told the AFI Fest daily paper, "'C.R.A.Z.Y. isn't so much a 'coming out' story as a coming-of-age love story between a father and son."
Old 11-12-05, 10:25 AM
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I've heard great things about this film and really look forward to watching it.

...which is not surprising as the best Canadian films are almost invariably from Québec.
I can't agree with this as there are a lot of great Canadian films outside of Quebec as well.
Old 11-12-05, 11:47 AM
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Great film. There was a thread about it in the International forum:

http://forum.dvdtalk.com/showthread.php?t=442743

...which is not surprising as the best Canadian films are almost invariably from Québec.
I have to agree. For the past few years, while the rest of Canada have occasionnally produced good films, the output from Quebec in terms of number and quality has been far superior. Currently, the Quebec film industry is more dynamic and creative than the rest of Canada.
Old 11-12-05, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by eXcentris
Great film. There was a thread about it in the International forum:

http://forum.dvdtalk.com/showthread.php?t=442743



I have to agree. For the past few years, while the rest of Canada have occasionnally produced good films, the output from Quebec in terms of number and quality has been far superior. Currently, the Quebec film industry is more dynamic and creative than the rest of Canada.
The past few years?!
Old 11-12-05, 05:43 PM
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You can buy the DVD cheaper on www.amazon.ca (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASI...49316-9316354). Please note the price is in Canadian dollars. Warning: The DVD jacket is in French only but the film has optional English subtitles.
Old 11-15-05, 01:48 PM
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Two more awards/honors:


Battle lines drawn for Prix Screen International

www.screendaily.com - paying site


Screen International staff in London
15 November 2005


The European Film Academy has announced 11 nominations for the Prix Screen International for non-European film.

The awards, backed by Screen International, reflect the wide geographical spread of this year's top films, taking in every continent.

Three of the films - C.R.A.Z.Y., Be With Me and Tsosti - have also been nominated to represent their respective countries for this year's Oscars.

The winner will be presented during the European Film Awards Ceremony on December 3 in Berlin.

The nominations are:

Battle In Heaven (Batalla En El Cielo)
Directed by Carlos Reygadas
(France/ Mexico/ Germany/ Belgium)
For Screen's review click here

Be With Me
Directed by Eric Khoo
(Singapore)
For Screen's review, click here

Brokeback Mountain
Directed by Ang Lee
(USA)
For Screen's review, click here

Broken Flowers
Directed by Jim Jarmusch
(USA)
For Screen's review, click here

The Constant Gardener
Directed by Fernando Meirelles
(UK/ Germany/ Kenya)
For Screen's review, click here

Crash
Directed by Paul Haggis
(USA)
For Screen's review, click here

C.R.A.Z.Y.
Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée
(Canada)
For Screen's review, click here


Good Night, And Good Luck
Directed by George Clooney
(USA)
For Screen's review, click here

Look Both Ways
Directed by Sarah Watt
(Australia)
For Screen's review, click here

Sympathy For Lady Vengeance
Directed by Park Chan-Wook
(South Korea)
For Screen's review, click here

Tsotsi
Directed by Gavin Hood
(UK/ South Africa)
For Screen's review, click here

Audience award at AFI LOs Angeles Film Festival:
http://www.indiewire.com/afifest/

The AFI Los Angeles International Film Festival capped off its 2005 edition with an awards ceremony atop the Hollywood ArcLight parking structure at the event's festival village, awarding Norway's "Kissed by Winter" its grand jury prize in the international feature competition, while the audience award for best feature film went to both Canada's "C.R.A.Z.Y." and South Africa's "Tsotsi."

Sara Johnsen's "Kissed by Winter" is the story of Victoria (Annika Hallin), a doctor who is called to the scene when a young refugee boy is found dead in a snow bank, while Gavin Hood's "Tsotsi," which won audience awards at the Edinburgh and Toronto film festivals, is based on the novel by renowned South African playwright Athol Fugard. The film traces six days in the violent life of a young thug in the Johannesburg ghettos and is South Africa's submission for foreign-language Oscar consideration. Hood gushed at the win when accepting the prize from the stage and praised the film's star Presley Cheweneyagae for carrying the film and marveled that the young man is a first-time actor. "Tsotsi" also received a special mention by the jury. "C.R.A.Z.Y." by French-Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee, meanwhile, is the story of a family spanning 20 years and one son's dysfunctional relationship with his father. The film is Canada's foreign-language Academy Award contender.

In the documentary competition, Zach Niles and Banker White won the Aquafina Pure Vision Award for their film "The Refugee All Stars." The film is the story of a group of six Sierra Leonean musicians who come together to form a band while living as refugees in the Republic of Guinea. Kelly Duda's "Factor 8: The Arkansas Prison Blood Scandal" received a special mention in the category. Jonathan Hock and Alistari Christopher's "Through the Fire" received the Netflix Audience Award for best documentary, which includes a $5000 unrestricted cash prize.

In the shorts competition, German director Till Nowak's "Delivery" received the fest's best short film prize in both the jury and audience competitions. Beaming from the stage, Nowak thanked the festival and wondered aloud if the other filmmakers were mad at him for taking both awards. The film centers on an old hermit who lives a lonely life under the dark shadows of industrial smog, but one day he receives a mysterious package, which gives him the ability to change his environment. Avie Luthra's "Lucky" received a special mention.

Actor Tom Arnold co-hosted the short ceremony Sunday evening peppering the evening with plentiful jokes leaving many in the audience in stitches. The night continued with the closing night film "Casanova" by Lasse Hallstrom.

Last edited by baracine; 11-15-05 at 01:51 PM.
Old 11-17-05, 01:45 AM
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It's not THAT great. I saw it and thought it was a very well-done if generic coming-of-age story with a killer soundtrack. My French Canadian friends love it as it gives them all this nostalgic feeling about their growing up blah blah, but for me I think it's too "safe", especially how it completely avoids ANY homosexual contacts...unless you count fists.
Old 11-17-05, 08:25 AM
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8/12 posts in this thread are from baracine
Old 11-23-05, 10:16 PM
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Let's make that 8/13.....and I kind of admire the guy's, let's say..."passionate" posting style.

Just gave the DVD a spin and I found the film pretty enjoyable and certainly worthy of praise; I liked it. I do agree for the most part with Grimfarrow's take on it, though I don't find fault in it being "too safe". But "yes", it does have that "Wonder Years"/"Freaks and Geaks" sort of vibe. The soundtrack is certainly a plus and I can see the whole "nostalgia" appeal, heck even I got a kick out of seeing the kid's first present - the hockey game (as a matter of fact, I still have one). Most of all, I enjoyed the performance from the actor who played the father; it was nice to see an honest look at fatherhood, actually I enjoyed the family dynamics as a whole. There were some very funny moments and some touching moments. For what it is worth, it took nearly fifty minutes in for the dawn to break upon me in regard to the derivation of the title of the film.

I wouldn't have any problem with seeing "C.R.A.Z.Y." shortlisted for the Oscars (and I do easily prefer it over last year's winner "The Sea Inside"). I've only seen 4 of the 58 candidates and even though I enjoyed "C.R.A.Z.Y", my "jaded and desensitized" self is pulling for the Danish entry "Adams Aebler" as of right now.

Back to "C.R.A.Z.Y.", it did make me chuckle early on when - given all the smoking in the film - I wondered what Cameron Spencer Osborne would have thought of things.

Last edited by flixtime; 11-23-05 at 10:19 PM.
Old 11-24-05, 02:47 AM
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Hum,

I live in Montreal and I strongly disagree with all the hype surrounding CRAZY.

Quite frankly, that movie really bored me. Fournier's first work (Liste Noire) was one crappy 'pseudo/genre' flick with no interest whatsover. This time, how ever, there are some majors improvements (10 frickin years later) but still, no sign of real interesting works.

Just in Canada (Quebec) there've been plenty of works that should have been considrer WAY before this film. La Vie avec mon Pere, Sebastien Rose's second feature is a good exemple. Or Petit Pow-Pow Noel from Robert Morin.

Quebec is no exception, the easy-going mainstream user-friendly cinema prevails. I still feel ashamed for the Sundance trip of La Grande Seduction which was one of the poorest film to ever came out of Quebec.

Boy oh boy...
Old 11-25-05, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by didyounotice
Hum,

I live in Montreal and I strongly disagree with all the hype surrounding CRAZY.

Quite frankly, that movie really bored me. Fournier's first work (Liste Noire) was one crappy 'pseudo/genre' flick with no interest whatsover. This time, how ever, there are some majors improvements (10 frickin years later) but still, no sign of real interesting works.
Fournier? It's by Jean-Marc Vallée. Liste Noire was mediocre but I don't see how a film he made 10 years ago is relevant when evaluating C.R.A.Z.Y.
That said, I liked the film quite a bit but I also grew up in that era so there might have been a nostalgia factor at work. Overall, it's a very good film albeit 15-20 min. too long.

Quebec is no exception, the easy-going mainstream user-friendly cinema prevails. I still feel ashamed for the Sundance trip of La Grande Seduction which was one of the poorest film to ever came out of Quebec.
What is wrong with mainstream cinema when it achieves it's goal? In this case a quirky, funny and often very clever film that get's people to laugh and that was well received everywhere it played. I don't think anyone ever claimed that La Grande Seduction was Citizen Kane but to claim that it's one of the poorest films to ever come out of Quebec is just ridiculous.

Last edited by eXcentris; 11-25-05 at 11:25 AM.
Old 11-25-05, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by didyounotice
Quebec is no exception, the easy-going mainstream user-friendly cinema prevails. I still feel ashamed for the Sundance trip of La Grande Seduction which was one of the poorest film to ever came out of Quebec.

Boy oh boy...
Whoa, momma...

There was absolutely nothing wrong with La Grande Séduction. It showed that Quebec commercial cinema could adopt a proven indie formula (that the Americans borrowed from British cinema, by the way) and make it work. That formula implies setting your realistic, human-interest story in a small, out of the way, village with many quirky, colourful inhabitants intent on overcoming their collective difficulties with a communal effort. I think it was very well done and that it showed off many purely local characteristics despite its borrowing of a cliché formula that had worked well in countless international hits.

There is an old saying that Quebec cinema is a hit in Quebec and around the world but can never do anything to please English Canadian audiences who still see it as a dangerous and intrusive "foreign" element in their "culture", one that is to be studied through various sociological filters and but never enjoyed for itself. It's a Canadian thing, I guess.

Last edited by baracine; 11-25-05 at 11:47 AM.
Old 11-25-05, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by baracine
There is an old saying that Quebec cinema is a hit in Quebec and around the world but can never do anything to please English Canadian audiences who still see it as a dangerous and intrusive "foreign" element in their "culture", one that is to be studied through various sociological filters and but never enjoyed for itself. It's a Canadian thing, I guess.
I think this is (was) more than just a Canadian thing. Even though some of the more "artsy" Quebec films (Lepage, etc...) were appreciated by critics and festival crowds, their appeal was limited. Whether mainstream or arthouse, Quebec films were mostly always deemed non exportable. Now that we have finally managed to make films with more international appeal like Barbarian Invasions, La Grande Seduction, and C.R.A.Z.Y., you have people blasting them for being too mainstream. What they don't seem to realize is that these mainstream films are getting French Canadian films known around the world which might in turn give more of a chance to the"artsy" films to be picked up by distributors.
Old 11-25-05, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by eXcentris
Whether mainstream or arthouse, Quebec films were mostly always deemed non exportable. Now that we have finally managed to make films with more international appeal like Barbarian Invasions, La Grande Seduction, and C.R.A.Z.Y., you have people blasting them for being too mainstream.
I understand what you are saying but I can't agree with your assessment that Quebec films have only been seen around the world since Barbarian Invasions (Arcand, 2003). I won't mention animation or documentaries... There was La Vie heureuse de Léopold Z (Carle, 1965), Mon Oncle Antoine (Jutra, 1971), and, before that, all the Geneviève Bujold vehicles, and then J.A. Martin, Photographe (Beaudin, 1977), The Decline of the American Empire (Arcand, 1986, Oscar nominee), on and on... A point could be made that every successful or award-winning indie film of the past twenty years owes something to a little NFB 1964 17-minute Quebec short called Le Temps perdu/The End of Summer by Michel Brault, which defined the "Quebec style" and introduced a certain kind of contemplative look at daily life in a fiction film, which has gone around the world's film schools many times since then. Its influence can be more recently felt in ultra-relaxed "sleepers" like The Station Agent, Napoleon Dynamite and Schultze Gets the Blues.

Last edited by baracine; 11-25-05 at 12:52 PM.
Old 11-25-05, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by baracine
Whoa, momma...

There was absolutely nothing wrong with La Grande Séduction. It showed that Quebec commercial cinema could adopt a proven indie formula (that the Americans borrowed from British cinema, by the way) and make it work. That formula implies setting your realistic, human-interest story in a small, out of the way, village with many quirky, colourful inhabitants intent on overcoming their collective difficulties with a communal effort. I think it was very well done and that it showed off many purely local characteristics despite its borrowing of a cliché formula that had worked well in countless international hits.
This IS what's wrong. The movie only applies a formula. There's a lack of writing, a lack of acting (except for Raymond Bouchard who is, as always, splendid) and a lack of directing.

Don't get me wrong, I have no bad feelings about 'Mainstream' cinema, it's just that I don't like when a movie with such little interest gets so many good words.

C.R.A.Z.Y., even if I didn't like the movie, I can respest Vallée's approach. There is something going on there. You can relate somehow to the characters in their geo-political environement.

It is the perfect opposite in La Grande Séduction. All the characters are merly bi-dimensional (and God I'm generous here). They all have one, or maybe two, factes and that's that. So you have a bunch of figures pasted on cardboard trying to make a village live through jokes and situations. It's a pale copy of a sitcom, minus the situation and the comedy.

But, hey, I'm a little bit picky. And my first motivation, by pointing that C.R.A.Z.Y was not so good, was to give a little credits to movies like Les États-Unis d'Albert or La Vie avec mon Père (this one had a pretty big success on his release.)
Old 11-25-05, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by didyounotice
This IS what's wrong. The movie only applies a formula. There's a lack of writing, a lack of acting (except for Raymond Bouchard who is, as always, splendid) and a lack of directing.
(Mumble, grumble...) Commercial cinema IS the application of a formula, with varying results. Please compare to English Canadian cinema whose main principle seems to be: "Do not compromise your integrity or your status as a state-subsidized artist - the viewer must experience nausea and/or catatonia to the point that he/she can't even stumble through the exit before the end of the film."

Last edited by baracine; 11-25-05 at 01:08 PM.
Old 11-25-05, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by eXcentris
Quebec films were mostly always deemed non exportable. Now that we have finally managed to make films with more international appeal like Barbarian Invasions, La Grande Seduction, and C.R.A.Z.Y., you have people blasting them for being too mainstream. What they don't seem to realize is that these mainstream films are getting French Canadian films known around the world which might in turn give more of a chance to the"artsy" films to be picked up by distributors.
This is the case with most of the regional cinemas.

Glober Rocha's specific guerrilla-about movies are, for most people, unsignificant outside of Brazil.

And, anyway, Quebec is well known on the International scene the rise of the NFB. Norman McLaren, Ryan Larkin and many others had they're share of success on the festival scene.

Releasing into the wild some movies that are NOT representative of the actual Quebec reality WILL NOT help putting to light or other, more slef-conscious, productions.

Even if CRAZY wins what ever is it that he's nominated for, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't help anyhow our industry. How come? I'm still looking for the impact of the Oscar decerned to Denys Arcand. The only one who benefits from that were Denys Arcand and denise Robert. The only DVDs I'm aware of are two older Arcand movies (Gina and Rejeanne Padovanni).

So, it's not true that making more 'internationally-appealing' movies will help the local industry.

(Pardon my english...)
Old 11-25-05, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by baracine
(Mumble, grumble...) Commercial cinema IS the application of a formula, with varying results. Please compare to English Canadian cinema whose main principle seems to be: "Do not compromise your integrity or your status as a state-subsidized artist - the viewer must experience nausea and/or boredom to the point that he/she can't even stumble through the exit before the end of the film."
Voilà,

Why I am wrong to stretch the fact that it is a shame to apply a formula in order to get recognition?

I mean, yeah, most of Anglo-Canadian productions are boring, this ain't no lie, but they at least reflect the crisis within their environement.

There is more to cinema than just plain-old storytelling, I mean, I tought that was obvious since the 60's.
Old 11-25-05, 01:12 PM
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Originally Posted by didyounotice
There is more to cinema than just plain-old storytelling...
That's true but only after you master the art of story-telling.
Old 11-25-05, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by baracine
That's true but only after you master the art of story-telling.
That is not true.

Guys like Jarmusch never really digged Storytelling but still manage to create some awesome movies.

Or, Ousmane Sembene is not a great stroy-teller but he is a great visionnary for his country.

And so on...
Old 11-25-05, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by didyounotice
Releasing into the wild some movies that are NOT representative of the actual Quebec reality WILL NOT help putting to light or other, more self-conscious, productions.
I am a Quebecker "exiled" in Toronto for the past 20 years. Maybe this affects my point of view but I can tell you that, viewed from where I am and knowing all I know about Quebec, films like La Grande Séduction and C.R.A.Z.Y. certainly reflect very much Quebec reality. I, for one, am always amazed at how much Quebec filmmakers get it right most of the time. You have to admit they certainly do a better job of it than any "outside" director ever could. [I was thinking about that awful Disney film, Big Red, shot in Quebec in 1962...]

Last edited by baracine; 11-25-05 at 01:26 PM.

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