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Carlos Saura's THE SEVENTH DAY (2004)

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Carlos Saura's THE SEVENTH DAY (2004)

Old 10-09-04, 03:01 PM
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Carlos Saura's THE SEVENTH DAY (2004)




Carlos Saura's latest project El Séptimo Día was just released in Spain by WB. The disc offers English subs and could be obtained through Fnac.SP or DVDGO.

Carlos Saura won the Best Director Award at Montreal this year with his new film.


***
There is a good article in VARIETY about Saura's latest film but you have to be a subscriber to read it (if anyone on this board is and is willing to post it that would be great).

"Carlos Saura is famous for his dance pics: "Blood Wedding," "Carmen," "Salome." But his latest film, "El septimo dia" (The Seventh Day), has just produced a political song-and-dance, the biggest film rumble in Spain's political jungle in years...."

http://www.variety.com/index.asp?lay...goryID=19&cs=1


Cheers,
Pro-B

Last edited by pro-bassoonist; 10-10-04 at 01:38 AM.
Old 10-13-04, 01:03 PM
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Here's the article from Variety- (posted it at Nicheflix as well)

***

"Variety
Saura pic stirs up political ire

John Hopewell
Aug 17, 2003

MADRID -- Carlos Saura is famous for his dance pics: "Blood Wedding," "Carmen," "Salome." But his latest film, "El septimo dia" (The Seventh Day), has just produced a political song-and-dance, the biggest film rumble in Spain's political jungle in years.

The kerfuffle could be manna from heaven for producer Andres Vicente Gomez's Lolafilms. But as Spain tenses for general elections early next year, it raises a question marks over whether the country, despite its vaunted political transition, has really attained the status of a full-fledged democracy, at least in regards to freedom of expression.

Shooting started July 28 on "Seventh Day," which turns on a true event, a massacre in Puerto Hurraco, a village in Extremadura, western Spain, one of the poorest parts of the country.

On Aug. 26, 1990, farmers Emilio and Antonio Izquierdo emptied their shotguns on a rival family, the Cabanillas, and any Hurraco villager who got in their way. Nine people died in the biggest multiple murder in modern Spain.

Seen from the point of view of a Cabanillas daughter, "Seventh Day" turns on whether the girl survives the slaughter and charts how violence snowballs from petty causes.

Saura's direction places the massacre in a wider social context, Gomez adds. Even in pre-production, local politicos took the pic as a slur against small-town folk. "Saura is a New York paparazzi ... offering an image of Extremadura, which is stolen, dark, shadowy, distant," thundered the president of Extremadura, Juan Carlos Rodriguez Ibarra, in the runup to recent regional elections. Saura was a "mediocre director," his culture counselor added.

The "Seventh Day" rumpus carries a strong sense of deja vu. In 1932, Spain's original bad-boy director, Luis Bunuel, visited the benighted Extremaduran mountains of Las Hurdes and shot scenes of such harrowing poverty -- hunger, cholera, dysentery, incest, death, dwarfs, all to the sound of Brahms Fourth Symphony -- that Spain's normally progressive Republican government banned the film outright.

No Spanish docu is held in higher regard.

President Rodriguez Ibarra is unimpressed: "Now we've got Carlos Saura. Haven't we had enough with Bunuel's 'Las Hurdes'?" he complains.

" 'Seventh Day' is a creative take on real events," says producer Gomez. "It doesn't put down all Extremadura, though it does suggest there are pockets of backwardness in Spain."

Rodriguez Ibarra, a socialist, probably would normally agree with the last point. But he doesn't want a high-profile helmer observing that one such pocket exists in his own backyard. Broiling behind the whole fracas, some commentators argue, is a growing wave of neo-conservatism in Spain.

Former San Sebastian Fest director Diego Galan points to a Spanish university study concluding that characters in Pedro Almodovar's first 13 films spend three hours smoking, drinking or drugging. Almodovar said the study filled him with "fear, disgust, amazement, fury and indignation."

Beyond gradually stepping up state aid, Spanish politicians have generally left the cinema alone. But film now seems fair game to score a point in Spain. And as parts of the country -- Barcelona, for instance -- now challenge France in chic modernity, the worst thing a filmmaker can suggest is that aspects of the old days still fester in Spain.

Copyright © 2003 Reed Business Information


Cheers,
Pro-B

Last edited by pro-bassoonist; 10-13-04 at 01:06 PM.
Old 10-13-04, 01:34 PM
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man. this looks good. must watch. any other reviews? btw, you know anything about a film called fumata blanca? it sounded interesting.
Old 12-12-05, 11:15 PM
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Wow! Just watched this one (in hindsight, I waited far too long after picking it up many months back). Chilling, disturbing, and very well done. I know it earned some recognition in film circles but judging by the rather limited information available via IMDb, it's a darned shame it seems to have been somewhat overlooked. A must-see in my book (and I really enjoyed the music too).
Old 12-13-05, 01:05 AM
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You are absolutely correct!! I never really figured out how come Criterion did not release at least one Carlos Saura film in their collection (well, as you all know they have not exactly embraced Spanish cinema to begin with). I always thought that aside from Bunuel they should have released at least one Saura and Bigas Luna films in their collection.
With this said, there is not a single decent Saura release in R1 land (even Goya lacks the extras it deserves). Tango is also horrible looking. Fortunately a few of the Spanish R2 discs offer English subs.

Ciao
Pro-B
Old 12-13-05, 07:30 AM
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and even with the Bunuel they have been french language so they have a wopping ZERO spanish language films. At least they are releasing a long overdue Bunuel in spanish. I can't believe i haven't picked this up yet. Is just hard to keep track of all the good stuff Pro-B points out and to keep the release of dvd dates with that of the film is too much. we need some sort of website with all this info.

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