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Sony CEO Sees 'Stalemate' in Disc Fight

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Sony CEO Sees 'Stalemate' in Disc Fight

Old 11-14-07, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by theflyingdutch
You obviously didn't read my other comment right after your initial "prove it" comment.
I think you need to look up the definition of proof.
Old 11-14-07, 12:26 PM
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I own quite a few DVDs and CDs. I started downloading music in 2005 and have created CDs as backups of all my music. Furthermore, I have purchased "label" CDs that are reasonably priced: Pat Benatar 20 songs for $9.99. Downloading can't beat that! I can't imagine a downloaded movie that would sate my appetite for physical media. Discs are here for the next decade at least.
Old 11-14-07, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by MoviePage
Human beings like to collect things. It's part of our nature. And one aspect of that is having the physical proof of our collection, whether just to look at and admire, or to show off to our friends. Physical movie storage formats aren't going anywhere in our lifetimes. Rentals will be replaced by downloading, but ownership will not.
I couldn't agree more.

Last edited by ResIpsa; 11-14-07 at 12:50 PM.
Old 11-14-07, 01:04 PM
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Buddhists aside, people want something tangible -- especially if it has pretty pictures. Think of how much carping goes on here about the lack of artwork on double-sided discs. Or the fact that there are so many options for adding artwork to blank media like Lightscribe, inkjet printable discs, or even the [abominable] adhesive labels. And that's just for something nobody sees, except for the few seconds it takes to transport it to or from their respective player!
Old 11-14-07, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
Don't most people rent though?
You must not be watching Blockbuster's stock price or store closings.
Old 11-14-07, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Josh Z
You must not be watching Blockbuster's stock price or store closings.
You're right, I haven't. I thought that a good part of that was due to Netflix though. I can see that the booming buying market has likely reduced the rental market at the moment, but I have to wonder at the new buyers: are they buying because they truly desire to own a copy of a film, or simply because it's cheaper/more convenient than the current rental market. Certainly part of the owning appeal is being able to have access to a large library of films/TV without having to leave the house. Once download/streaming has reached the capability of letting someone have access to tens of thousands of titles, all without leaving the couch, will these people still really see the need to own a physical copy of any of them?
Old 11-14-07, 10:18 PM
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I know I'll want a hard copy of some of the movies I get, because you can sign a download!
Old 11-14-07, 11:25 PM
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I suspect that those who are arguing that downloads will take over are those who look forward to that model, while those who want physical media are saying it will survive (or even remain dominant).

In the end, it probably doesn't matter, because they will likely both be viable ways of getting movies. It's like arguing over whether there should be extras on discs: some want them, some don't; and both groups will be accomodated.
Old 11-15-07, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by MoviePage
Human beings like to collect things. It's part of our nature. And one aspect of that is having the physical proof of our collection, whether just to look at and admire, or to show off to our friends. Physical movie storage formats aren't going anywhere in our lifetimes. Rentals will be replaced by downloading, but ownership will not.
I think you vastly overestimate the number of collector-types there are out there. Look at where CD sales are going and where digital music sales are going.
Old 11-15-07, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Tracer Bullet
I think you vastly overestimate the number of collector-types there are out there. Look at where CD sales are going and where digital music sales are going.
Digital downloads are geared towards the teenage crowd, who all just happen to own iPods. Music is an "on the go" thing. With downloads, you get to pick and choose what songs you want, rather than taking a risk of paying $10 and getting burned.
Old 11-15-07, 09:35 AM
  #211  
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Originally Posted by Mr. Cinema
Digital downloads are geared towards the teenage crowd, who all just happen to own iPods. Music is an "on the go" thing. With downloads, you get to pick and choose what songs you want, rather than taking a risk of paying $10 and getting burned.
It's different, but not too different. Movies-on-the-go is still not ubiquitous. Sure, on this site people may have iPSPs and Nanoviewers or whatever, but I haven't come across anyone seeing a movie on the go in weeks. But people listening to music on the go is something I see several times a day.

To anyone who thinks downloads won't do well in the future, imagine what happens when something like Kaleidescape becomes prevalent. Sure, for now it's in the tens of thousands of dollars but there's no reason a home version of this won't exist in the next decade that's affordable (at least to people on here). The website doesn't do it justice. I saw an in-store demo of this and was floored. I would've gotten it if it the price wasn't stratospheric.

Physical media won't die. Collectors will still be around. But not to the extent we saw with DVD.
Old 11-15-07, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Tracer Bullet
I think you vastly overestimate the number of collector-types there are out there. Look at where CD sales are going and where digital music sales are going.
You may or may not be right on the point about collectors, but I do think that CD vs. music downloads and DVD vs. movie downloads are two very different issues with different factors affecting the numbers, and the trend in one shouldn't be looked at to predict trends in the other.
Old 11-15-07, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by MoviePage
You may or may not be right on the point about collectors, but I do think that CD vs. music downloads and DVD vs. movie downloads are two very different issues with different factors affecting the numbers, and the trend in one shouldn't be looked at to predict trends in the other.
Of course, but it's also important to remember that masses of people buying movies is a phenomenon that started with DVD because it was so cheap. I still know lots of people that own very few DVDs. I would bet that the number of music collectors vs. the number of movie collectors are pretty equal.
Old 11-15-07, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Cinema
Digital downloads are geared towards the teenage crowd, who all just happen to own iPods. Music is an "on the go" thing. With downloads, you get to pick and choose what songs you want, rather than taking a risk of paying $10 and getting burned.
Whether or not digital downloads are geared toward "the teenage crowd" is debatable. Even if true, when they're older those teenagers are not going to be interested in going out and buying CDs.

Also, I play all my music on my computer from iTunes. I don't even own a stereo or a standalone CD player, and I'm almost 27. Having a huge collection of CDs sitting on shelves that I have to sift though and swap out whenever I want to listen to something seems insane to me now. I still buy CDs, but they're ripped and then put in the closet.
Old 11-15-07, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Tracer Bullet
Whether or not digital downloads are geared toward "the teenage crowd" is debatable. Even if true, when they're older those teenagers are not going to be interested in going out and buying CDs.

Also, I play all my music on my computer from iTunes. I don't even own a stereo or a standalone CD player, and I'm almost 27. Having a huge collection of CDs sitting on shelves that I have to sift though and swap out whenever I want to listen to something seems insane to me now. I still buy CDs, but they're ripped and then put in the closet.
You actually prove his point for him. Listening to music is a different experience than watching a movie. With music, it's very likely that you'd only want to listen to an individual song, or a mix of songs of your own choosing, rather than sit for an entire album that may have a bunch of songs on it that you don't care for. It doesn't work that way with movies, however. You're not going to rip just one chapter of a movie to watch on its own, or mixed with scenes from other movies. You're going to want to sit in a comfortable environment to watch the movie in its entirety.
Old 11-15-07, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Josh Z
You actually prove his point for him. Listening to music is a different experience than watching a movie. With music, it's very likely that you'd only want to listen to an individual song, or a mix of songs of your own choosing, rather than sit for an entire album that may have a bunch of songs on it that you don't care for. It doesn't work that way with movies, however. You're not going to rip just one chapter of a movie to watch on its own, or mixed with scenes from other movies. You're going to want to sit in a comfortable environment to watch the movie in its entirety.
And why can't I do that with a 500TB media server connected to my television? Trust me, it's coming.
Old 11-15-07, 03:14 PM
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I can't imagine how devastated I would be if my 500 TB media server failed.
Old 11-15-07, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by spainlinx0
I can't imagine how devastated I would be if my 500 TB media server failed.
If you don't back up, who's fault is that?

Look, I'm not saying this is a good or a bad thing. Even though CD sales are declining, they're going to continue to sell them for years, possibly even decades. You can still buy vinyl, after all.

Collectors will still be able be able to get their coveted physical media, but I think it's becoming clear how average people will watch movies in the future.
Old 11-15-07, 04:18 PM
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I love all the talk about HD on demand. It takes forever to download SD content from iTunes the bandwith in this country is so bad. Now I'm expected to believe I will be able to download or stream an HD flick with the quality of HD DVD? When is all this great bandwith coming?
Old 11-15-07, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Tracer Bullet
If you don't back up, who's fault is that?

Look, I'm not saying this is a good or a bad thing. Even though CD sales are declining, they're going to continue to sell them for years, possibly even decades. You can still buy vinyl, after all.

Collectors will still be able be able to get their coveted physical media, but I think it's becoming clear how average people will watch movies in the future.
at the concept of convincing the average person to backup their data regularly.

What would the backup media be anyway? A whole other 500TB drive? What if they both get toasted at the same time?
Old 11-15-07, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by bunkaroo
What would the backup media be anyway? A whole other 500TB drive? What if they both get toasted at the same time?
A large RAID 5 array?
Old 11-15-07, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by The Bus
A large RAID 5 array?
Again, I know these solutions exist, but expecting the average consumer-type to grapple with these concepts is not realistic in my opinion.

People like you or me might feel comfortable configuring a RAID, swapping a drive, etc., but what about the non-technically inclined who would buy into such a large storage system?
Old 11-15-07, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by darkside
I love all the talk about HD on demand. It takes forever to download SD content from iTunes the bandwith in this country is so bad. Now I'm expected to believe I will be able to download or stream an HD flick with the quality of HD DVD? When is all this great bandwith coming?
Don't you stream HD content from your cable company or Dish now to your TV/DVR/HD-TiVo?
Old 11-15-07, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by bunkaroo
Again, I know these solutions exist, but expecting the average consumer-type to grapple with these concepts is not realistic in my opinion.

People like you or me might feel comfortable configuring a RAID, swapping a drive, etc., but what about the non-technically inclined who would buy into such a large storage system?
HD on demand won't take off until it's easy to use. This is at least five years away. I expect, though am not certain, that video content will take a subscription model as opposed to a ownership model.
Old 11-15-07, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tracer Bullet
HD on demand won't take off until it's easy to use. This is at least five years away. I expect, though am not certain, that video content will take a subscription model as opposed to a ownership model.
I would much rather pay $20 upfront to own a film than $5 a go to watch it. Even if I only watched the owned version a couple times, I am paying for the ability to watch it whenever I want to.

VOD and subscriptions are contingent upon factors outside of my house. Outside of a power loss or the rapture, disc-based content is not.

I recognize that the current generation of young people may not care about owning movies in the way we are accustomed to owning them, but I suspect it'll be a good 25 years before movies are gone from recorded media.

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