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720p vs 1080p (or Night vs Day)

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720p vs 1080p (or Night vs Day)

Old 11-13-06, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by PixyJunket
Either way, it'd probably be too small to notice.
Depends. Panasonic's 768p plasmas wouldn't even accept 720p input for the longest time, and when they did, the scaling wound up looking kinda lousy. 1080i looks much, much better on my display than 720p, even though its display resolution is closer to the latter.
Old 11-13-06, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Adam Tyner
Depends. Panasonic's 768p plasmas wouldn't even accept 720p input for the longest time, and when they did, the scaling wound up looking kinda lousy. 1080i looks much, much better on my display than 720p, even though its display resolution is closer to the latter.
This is very common. I think the TV makers saw the problems with getting PC output to the TVs, and went to WXGA much of the time. I guess they didn't realize that it is easier to make a video card scale to 720p than an HD receiver go to 768p.

PS,
Sorry, wasn't trying to be difficult. I would hazard a guess that your preference for your plasma is based on more important issues than resolution. (that's one thing where that article made sense, quoting the ISF) But if you compared to the new 1080p Pioneer 50" instead of your friends LCD or whatever, I'd bet you'd want it over your 5060. Got another $8K?
Old 11-13-06, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Spiky
This is very common. I think the TV makers saw the problems with getting PC output to the TVs, and went to WXGA much of the time. I guess they didn't realize that it is easier to make a video card scale to 720p than an HD receiver go to 768p.

PS,
Sorry, wasn't trying to be difficult. I would hazard a guess that your preference for your plasma is based on more important issues than resolution. (that's one thing where that article made sense, quoting the ISF) But if you compared to the new 1080p Pioneer 50" instead of your friends LCD or whatever, I'd bet you'd want it over your 5060. Got another $8K?

Its cool dont worry about it. My plasma simply looks much much better, and by no small margin, playing in 1080i. I dont know why that is when the native format is 720p. That is just the way it is.One thing is for sure, the Pioneer Plasma's have an amazing picture.

I Was in no way trying to belittle 1080p. I was simply saying that with the smaller TV's and increasingly moreso the smaller you get. The additional cost for the TV really doesnt equal the additional quality in picture. I have actually seen the 1080p Elite Pioneers and wether you believe it or not, standing at about the distance away from the TV that I usually watch my TV (About 9-10 feet) There really wasnt that much difference in the picture quality. Yes it was better but not leaps and bunds and not enough to make me want to upgrade. The PDP5060 on 1080i has an absolutly stunning picture.

So again dont worry about it, I wasnt upset with your posts anyways.

PS..
Old 11-20-06, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by joshd2012
Nope. Plasmas were originally the 720 users. I think you'll have a difficult time finding a 720 LCD. Most use 768. At least, Sony, Samsung, and Sharp all use that size - not sure about the rest.

Edit: I believe LCD RP use 720.
My 50" Sony RP-LCD A10 has a x720 native resolution.

As for the original post, I do agree that with a nice-sized FP setup, 720p would most likely pale in comparison to a nice 1080p source-to-display experience.

That said...I dunno if a blanket "Night vs. Day" statement is accurate, when you take into account how many people can actually experience that on a daily basis =P

It'd be nice and all, but unless you've got a proper home theater set-up...I think the best you can hope for is "quite a bit prettier".
Old 11-21-06, 01:02 PM
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Ive had my A1 on a isf calibrated 720p native rez DLP set and now with my new 1080p native rez DLP set....Yes, there is a difference, but I dont think its night and day.

Its ALOT less of a difference than say Upscaled sd DVD vs 720p HD.
Old 11-21-06, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay G.
"While this isn't the most scientific test, both Katzmaier and I agreed that, after scanning through Mission: Impossible III for an hour, it would be very difficult--practically impossible--for the average consumer to tell the difference between a high-definition image displayed on a 1080p-capable TV and one with lower native resolution at the screen sizes mentioned above [under 50"]. At larger screen sizes, the differences might become somewhat more apparent, especially if you sit close to the screen."

So krdave might still benefit from a 1080 projector, as may some others with larger than 50" displays. Also, the article never mentions the distance they're viewing the TVs at, which is problematic for determining if you're one of the ones that sits closer than they did.
That is the thing that irritates me. People buy a 20" HD lcd for their bedroom that they sit 12' away from. You could get a crappy 19" tube tv for under $100 and it would look the same. But the advertisers just love the HDTV song right now.

I expect the difference will shock me when I do upgrade. From 12-13' away with a 122" screen, you see a lot. It looks amazing, but I can see that it could be slightly better.

Seems like one of the things I read talked about ideally having a screen that takes up 30% of your field of vision. But I'm a front row theater guy, and I want it closer to 50%
Old 11-21-06, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by kvrdave
That is the thing that irritates me. People buy a 20" HD lcd for their bedroom that they sit 12' away from. You could get a crappy 19" tube tv for under $100 and it would look the same. But the advertisers just love the HDTV song right now.

I expect the difference will shock me when I do upgrade. From 12-13' away with a 122" screen, you see a lot. It looks amazing, but I can see that it could be slightly better.

Seems like one of the things I read talked about ideally having a screen that takes up 30% of your field of vision. But I'm a front row theater guy, and I want it closer to 50%
I'm the same way. As I have things set up now, I sit about 9' away from my 61" HDTV. I know there's some simple calculation floating around the net that will tell you the ideal viewing distance for the specific size of your monitor...and from what I recall, I'm a little too close. With SD material (namely DVD movies), I could see a little blur at times around the edges of actors or objects in the movie. Now with HD content, I've never felt better about sitting close to my monitor. It's quite an experience to be up that close and still see sharpness.
Old 11-21-06, 10:12 PM
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^ I sit about 8 feet away from my 71in DLP....no problems here....i dont buy those ideal viewing distances personally.
Old 11-22-06, 02:24 AM
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^
'bout 9ft away from my 50" x720 set, no issues at all.
Old 11-22-06, 12:15 PM
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Found this calculator you can use to obtain optimal viewing distance for several criteria: Optimal Viewing Distance.

Take it for what it's worth. My [simple] rule of thumb is, if you can see pixels, you're too close.

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