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The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

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The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Old 02-15-13, 12:40 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

I'll get caught up on the thread discussion shortly, but I just finished ranking and reviewing Amarcord, which is one of the Criterion Collection titles on Hulu (meaning you can stream it free this weekend, as Mister Peepers mentioned. Here are my initial remarks from my Letterboxd diary. I'll very likely come back and explore this one further in September for the Criterion Challenge, if not sooner.
Spoiler:
Amarcord made my third Fellini film, following 8 1/2 and La strada. It took me two viewings to really take to 8 1/2, but I fell for La strada instantly. Amarcord is more like 8 1/2, where I recognize the artistry and relevance of it all but I can't quite say after one viewing that it's a favorite.

I awakened around 4:30 in the morning and realized I was not going to successfully fall back asleep. It seemed like the perfect time of day to stream a Fellini film, as I've found I favor his particular storytelling style in the wee hours. There's a dreamlike nature, even outside the obviously surreal segments, that somehow benefits from the rest of the world being asleep.

It took me about twenty minutes or so to cotton on that each segment was a self-contained vignette, with the through story being the structure of the year from Spring to Spring. The first three vignettes really don't have much to do with one another: the bonfire, the school kids misbehaving, and Aurelio coming home for lunch and quarreling with his family. It's also odd to have so many characters break the fourth wall and address us directly, in addition to Titta's voiceover narration.

For whatever reason, it wasn't until the scene of the Emir arriving at the Grand Hotel that I became conscious of the fact that this was my first viewing of a Fellini film shot in color. I don't know why it took me that long, or even what the relevance is, but I was taken out of the movie for most of that scene by the delayed realization.

I intend to go back later and watch the pair of bonus feature clips available to stream on Hulu and to read whatever essays are shared on the Criterion website, so I'll have more to say about Amarcord later.

Amarcord entered my Flickchart at #77/1481

Amarcord
47th Academy Awards (1974)
(W) FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM -- Italy

48th Academy Awards (1975)
(N) DIRECTING -- Federico Fellini
(N) WRITING (Original Screenplay) -- Federico Fellini, Tonino Guerra
Old 02-15-13, 01:03 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by mrcellophane
Stop being so damn smart!!! Points taken. Your right that it takes a higher level of scrutiny and critical thought to compare those films and work out points of comparison and what aspects you value more. I still find it very difficult to rate and compare wildly different films. I have such different criteria for different genres as well as a hierarchy of form and narratives. And these are all evolving and changing as I familiarize myself with more and more films and narratives.
I've grown into a sort of holistic view of films. It started, I think, when I gave up categorizing my library and just alphabetized the whole thing. It broke the barriers for me in a tangible way. Then Flickchart came along and completely destroyed whatever psychological barriers remained for me. Each film scratches different itches, speaks to me in different ways.

Originally Posted by ntnon
Yes, aside from the already given (by others) reasons against taking on the enormity of one of these ratings/chart things, I find it hard to even begin to compare the truly diverse. I can almost, if pushed, try to formulate a star rating, but find it usually tends to be 1-, 3- or 5- out of five, or similar: Bad, Average or Excellent.
My 5-star system is like that. If you look on my Letterboxd profile, you'll see I consider most movies 3s; few of them are 5s and even fewer are 1s. I use 2s and 4s to indicate movies that are either not quite strong enough to be 5s or not quite bad enough to be 1s. I use 1/2 star ratings, too, but those are mostly a cop-out to keep me from committing to 1s or 5s.

Plus my favourites tend to rotate or be more of less favoured in different contexts and times. I can often come up with a top ten (although I usually subsequently remember half-a-dozen that should have replaced one or added to the list), but I try not to even think about ranking them #1, #2, #3 and #4 because it's so much more than that.
This gets to an ongoing, central debate among core Flickchart users. Some feel that their ranked list should be static, where first-time viewings rarely crack their Top 100. I, on the other hand, embrace a more fluid view of my ranked list in large part because I go through phases. I might go on a high brow art kick (which, curiously enough, seems to coincide with September's Criterion Challenge ), then a horror kick (hmm...October, maybe?). As I focus on each milieu, it colors which of my personal favorites stand out to me at any given time.

It could be argued that I'm just fickle or flaky, but I put way too much thought into movies for me to believe that.

Also, I fear that the (snobs) smart people would sneer at me if I rated some great films poorly.
My #1 is Batman, and I have The Transformers: The Movie at #8. You have to go all the way down to #366 to find The Godfather. Vertigo, named last year as the best movie of all time by the Sight & Sound list? I've got it at #952.

My point here is to never fret over what anyone has to say about your taste, or about you based on your taste. You respond to whatever it is that you respond to, however it is that you respond to it. That's all any of us do. I've been left cold by lots of highly acclaimed, popular movies. C'est la vie.

Originally Posted by Mister Peepers
I don't know how many Criterions are eligible for this challenge but
Criterion has an Oscar Winners section in their Themes. Of course, that omits movies that were nominated but didn't win and it also doesn't include Hulu-only movies, but it's a starting place.
Old 02-15-13, 01:31 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Got a couple things to mention in this topic. First of all, I just resubscribed to Hulu Plus in ortder to watch certain tv shows, and was curious, is there anywhere I can find a list of movies on Hulu that are eligible for this challenge, or would I just have to search for them individually using the Academy Award Database linked on page 1 of this thread? Second, I just finished watching Fellowship of the Ring, and noticed, not only was it nominated for Best Picture, it was also an effects nominee. Guess that means it must be an exception to the rule that only 'bad' films are nominated for effects.
Old 02-15-13, 01:35 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by shadokitty
Got a couple things to mention in this topic. First of all, I just resubscribed to Hulu Plus in ortder to watch certain tv shows, and was curious, is there anywhere I can find a list of movies on Hulu that are eligible for this challenge, or would I just have to search for them individually using the Academy Award Database linked on page 1 of this thread?
I'm unaware of such a list, but I would also be interested in one!
Old 02-15-13, 06:00 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Last night was my group's weekly movie night, and it was my turn to choose the film. Since it was Valentine's Day, I decided to go with Libeled Lady, one of my all-time favorite screwball comedies. It is up there with Bringing Up Baby and The Philadelphia Story, and I actually prefer it to the former. The cast pairs up William Powell with Myrna Loy (one of my favorite pairings) and Spencer Tracey with Jean Harlow. One of the reasons I love it is that the filmmakers obviously care about the characters. While they are flawed individuals to be sure, none of them are utterly ridiculous. Also, it's one of those oddities that was nominated for Best Picture and nothing else.

I wish that it got more recognition and acclaim; it really needs to be remastered and cleaned up. The film was made the year before Jean Harlow died and highlights her really well. I love the difference between her dresses and those of Myrna Loy's character. Harlow is often dressed like she's going to battle with huge shoulders and big hats. It's a great film!
Old 02-16-13, 10:38 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by ntnon
Take Singin' in the Rain. Nevermind the titular song-and-dance (which is excellent whether or not it was one take), Moses Supposes is a superb (even if Kelly nearly slips over on a piece of trash) masterclass in dance. Make 'em Laugh is hilarious and so technically diverse as to be beyond most numbers in most musicals. In the Morning is just so happy and joyful, and fits so well into the - yes - plot, that it's a highlight almost as good as the cake-bursting number. (I could very easily believe that Kelly's slow smile is genuine, and it makes the romantic subplot - usually the low point of most films, since it's so often unbelievable, unnecessary or distracting - seem very real.) The mishmash showcasing SOUND on FILM! is great, and even the main "Broadway Rhythm" song-and-dance is fairly good, and the skip through the Follies is brilliant, but - Cyd Charisse's appearance aside - the rest of the dream-within-a-dream sequence is very, very dull. And extraneous to the plot and pointless. It's balletic, it's veils and it's oddly linked to the mafia. Very strange!
I actually enjoy the Singin' in the Rain ballet more than others--perhaps because it is so random and detached, rather than An American in Paris trying hard to recap the film. Or maybe just because top to bottom it's a better film. Note that it's been a while since I've seen either ballet so I may be a bit offbase there.

The Band Wagon is another interesting random one with gangsters, but while I was like Fred Astaire, the ballet isn't prime watching for me. Then again, I feel the whole film is a bit overrated, which I know is sacrilege for a Fred fan!

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
Don't take my word for it. (Haven't you learned that here by now? ) They're important films and you should see them anyway, esp. the following:
CIMARRON, STAGECOACH, THE PALEFACE, HIGH NOON, SHANE, HOW THE WEST WAS WON, BUTCH CASSIDY, TRUE GRIT, and, of course, one of my all-time favorites, THE WILD BUNCH.
What I meant was that in the overall pantheon of westerns, the Oscar-nominated group you listed, with some exceptions, generally doesn't compare with the auteurist classics at the top tier (e.g. Howard Hawks' and John Ford's finest westerns, Anthony Mann's westerns, including the five with James Stewart, some of Peckinpah's films, the Leones, Aldrich's VERA CRUZ, some of John Sturges' westerns, etc.).
I've been trying to build up my knowledge of Westerns over the last few years and agree that I'm getting much better bang for my buck during the May Historical challenge (or the B movie challenge) than the Oscar challenge. Of the Oscar qualifiers Ash mentions, I saw High Noon, Shane, HTWWW, Butch Cassidy, and The Wild Bunch before my Westerns drive (kinda like a cattle drive), just as a general movie fan, and I think all of them except HTWWW are pretty digestible even for someone who isn't specifically into Westerns.

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
(Oh, and BTW, MIDNIGHT COWBOY is not a western!)
Old 02-16-13, 11:42 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Last night was great. I finally watched My Fair Lady on Blu-ray. I got it for Christmas but saved it for the challenge. The transfer was OK but paled in comparison to others like Singin In The Rain or The Red Shoes. After that, I took advantage of Hulu's free weekend preview of their Criterion film collection to watch the 1938 original, Pygmalion. It was amazing how much of the dialogue was verbatim between the two movies.

Today is a hodgepodge of 50's & 60's movies to complete my checklist, including To Kill A Mockingbird, An American In Paris and a first watch of A Place In the Sun.
Old 02-16-13, 06:05 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by popcorn
Last night was great. I finally watched My Fair Lady on Blu-ray. I got it for Christmas but saved it for the challenge. The transfer was OK but paled in comparison to others like Singin In The Rain or The Red Shoes. After that, I took advantage of Hulu's free weekend preview of their Criterion film collection to watch the 1938 original, Pygmalion. It was amazing how much of the dialogue was verbatim between the two movies.

Today is a hodgepodge of 50's & 60's movies to complete my checklist, including To Kill A Mockingbird, An American In Paris and a first watch of A Place In the Sun.

from all the reviews I've read, the transfer is flawed - that's why I wont buy it on blu.

just about to watch Ice Station Zebra

watched Kon-Tiki last night and wow! it has no chance since 'Amour' is locked to win Best Foreign Film, but it's such an amazing recounting of the boat Kon-Tiki and it's amazing journey across the Pacific ocean - it's Norway's most expensive film and it shows - the special fx are amazing (and scary!) - the fantastic DLP digital presentation I saw, I swear, the detail of the sharks, made me wince in fear.
Old 02-16-13, 10:02 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

I just watched Murder, Inc. (1960) on Fox Movie Channel On Demand and they interrupted it half way through to show a commercial to advertise how their movies are shown without commercial interruption.
Old 02-17-13, 09:19 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
BAMBI is my favorite Disney feature, chiefly because it's about animals in their natural habitat who don't have to deal with and do drudge work for pesky, intrusive humans like Snow White and Sleeping Beauty. And none of them sing.
If you want a Disney movie without singing animals, how about Pocahontas? I just revisited it, and not only do they not sing, the animals don't even talk.
Old 02-17-13, 01:57 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

As big a fan I am of "all things Marty" I'm surprised I've never watched The Aviator. I'm just a few scenes in and I already want to read a biography on Katharine Heburn. From Cate Blanchett's portrayal of her, she seems like she was quite the pistol.
Old 02-17-13, 11:10 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by shadokitty
If you want a Disney movie without singing animals, how about Pocahontas? I just revisited it, and not only do they not sing, the animals don't even talk.

Cinderella is the worst, those mice just drive me up the walls - oh how I wish the cat had eaten just one of them.
Old 02-18-13, 09:06 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Got together with a friend yesterday to revisit a longtime favorite of both of ours, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. From my Letterboxd diary entry:

Spoiler:
After learning that a friend of mine whom I know loves this movie as much as I do only had it on VHS(!), I decided she needed to own the extended version on DVD. Because, Alan Rickman. I surprised her with the DVD a few weeks ago and we finally got together to watch it. She'd never seen the extended cut, and what was interesting to me was how even though she said it had been several years since she last saw it, she was able to very quickly spot the added footage.

All eleven minutes of the restored content fleshes out the Sheriff of Nottingham's storyline which means more Alan Rickman, for one thing. Normally, deleted scenes - even interesting ones - really don't add to the narrative. Here, though, the deleted scenes not only greatly expand the Sheriff's character arc and his relationship with the witch, Moriana, but there are on-screen explanations for some story elements that aren't in the final cut. They're not necessarily glaring issues, though, and it's only once you've seen the extra scenes that they become more conspicuous. As my friend put it, "It fills in plot holes you didn't even think to notice were there."

One thing I caught more of this time than I've consciously noted in previous viewings is specifically how Rickman moves. He has a seemingly different gait and posture in each scene, whether bored, frustrated, furious, cautious or darkly playful. His Sheriff is extremely kinetic, certainly more than most screen villains in previous Robin Hood adaptations.

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was re-ranked to #35 on my Flickchart


64th Academy Awards (1991)
(N) MUSIC (Original Song) - "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You" Music by Michael Kamen, Lyrics by Bryan Adams & Robert John Lange

I will never forgive the Academy for picking "Beauty and the Beast" over "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You". Never.
Old 02-18-13, 09:50 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Well, I finally saw a Best Picture winner in this challenge, one of the few in this category I'd never seen before, CHARIOTS OF FIRE (1981), also the first movie from the 1980s I've seen for this challenge. So now I've seen at least one movie from each of the decades from the 1920s to the 1980s. I still have to do the '90s and the 2010s.

There's a reason I've avoided CHARIOTS OF FIRE for this long. Two guys in England in the early 1920s like to run and decide to compete in the 1924 Olympics. I'm sorry, but that's pretty low-concept for me. I just don't care about the Olympics and I never have! At the end, an onscreen title declares that one of the runners, Eric Liddell, died in Occupied China at the end of WWII. It doesn't say HOW he died. Now, that's the story I wanted to see, since there are relatively few historical dramas made in the west about the war in China. A Scotsman working in China during the war, presumably as a missionary, is what intrigues me. I couldn't care less about his running.

P.S. I just looked up Eric Liddell on Wikipedia and the story of his heroism and self-sacrifice as a leader among the other western prisoners in a Japanese-run prison camp in China near the end of the war is heart-wrenching. That would make a great movie.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Liddell

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 02-18-13 at 02:39 PM.
Old 02-18-13, 02:21 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Watched Cross Creek the other day and I wasn't impressed. With all of the quality work Alfre Woodard has done in her career she was nominated for this! Woodard gave a better performance and had a more interesting and fleshed-out character in First Contact. What can you do?
Old 02-18-13, 07:11 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by lisadoris
Watched Cross Creek the other day and I wasn't impressed. With all of the quality work Alfre Woodard has done in her career she was nominated for this! Woodard gave a better performance and had a more interesting and fleshed-out character in First Contact. What can you do?
Reminds me, I still plan to possibly watch First Contact sometime during this challenge, as iirc, it is eligible.
Old 02-18-13, 08:36 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

watched the Oscar Nominated 2013 Live Action Shorts this afternoon at the Avalon - my favorite was a close tie between 'Curfew' and 'Asad'
Old 02-19-13, 06:14 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

In looking for something from the '90s that's eligible but also easily accessible in my collection, I came across UNDER SIEGE and looked it up and it is indeed eligible, having been nominated for Best Sound and Best Sound Effects. So I can watch a Steven Seagal movie for this challenge!
Old 02-19-13, 10:35 PM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Finally got around to watching Munich tonight. From my Letterboxd diary:

Spoiler:
I wanted to see this during its original release, but missed it. When I began tonight to play the DVD I've had for an embarrassingly long time, I was given the choice to watch an introduction by director Steven Spielberg. I elected to view it. He emphasizes that this film "is not meant to be a documentary", citing in part the lack of access to classified documents pertinent to the events portrayed. I couldn't help but to think of the recent flap over screenwriter Tony Kushner's needless revisionism of minor details in Lincoln, and I confess that to hear Spielberg so ardently distance the film from historical veracity tainted my enthusiasm from the outset. Maybe it shouldn't, but it did.

Of course, Munich has one key advantage in the "historically accurate" realm with me: At its heart, it's a spy story and I cut those quite a lot of leeway. Spy stories and Westerns - they're the two kinds of storytelling where as long as everything checks out as plausible, I'll go along with most anything as long as the narrative is interesting and engaging. It's the romantic in me.

Regarding Munich strictly as a spy movie, I have to say it's one of the better ones I've seen. Part-Untouchables, part-Mission: Impossible with a dash of The Spy Who Came In from the Cold, it hits the highlights of spy story intrigue. Suspense, tedious legwork, mistrust, cynicism, anxiety, more tedious legwork, isolation, disillusionment and then some more tedious legwork...Good stuff.

Spielberg is first and foremost a teller of stories about human beings and he sees the world of these not-Mossad agents through that lens. There's not a lot here in the way of logistics, for instance. We never see the team go through customs or have to explain themselves or present cover stories, not even to check into hotel rooms, which they seem to be able to do quite easily. I know it was the early 70s and all, but that seems like basic Spy Storytelling 101 to me. It's not relevant in the context of the story Spielberg is telling, though, which is instead about putting a human face on the people who operate in the cloak and dagger world.

We don't need to know how the team actually gets in and out of places, or to see them ever interact with their bank account more than once to accept that these things are resolved off-camera. This isn't a how-to tutorial on espionage. It's a reductive take on that kind of work meant to ask questions - and to get us asking them, too. There are passages that bear Spielberg's trademark lack of subtlety that feel incongruous with the more nuanced shades of gray he's exploring here, but on the whole it's still a solid place to start a conversation.

Munich entered my Flickchart at #470/1482


Munich
78th Academy Awards (2005)
(N) DIRECTING -- Steven Spielberg
(N) FILM EDITING -- Michael Kahn
(N) MUSIC (Original Score) -- John Williams
(N) BEST PICTURE -- Kathleen Kennedy, Steven Spielberg and Barry Mendel, Producers
(N) WRITING (Adapted Screenplay) -- Screenplay by Tony Kushner and Eric Roth
Old 02-20-13, 12:54 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
Don't take my word for it. (Haven't you learned that here by now? ) They're important films and you should see them anyway, esp. the following:
CIMARRON, STAGECOACH, THE PALEFACE, HIGH NOON, SHANE, HOW THE WEST WAS WON, BUTCH CASSIDY, TRUE GRIT, and, of course, one of my all-time favorites, THE WILD BUNCH.
Tempting though it is to ignore you(!), I have actually seen half of those - Stagecoach (Criterion Challenge) first, and Paleface, Shane and Butch this month. Hurrah for me! I've also seen three-quarters of True Grit, but my disc was scratched-up because it was in the no-proper-holders R2 John Wayne Collection, and flatly refused to play the ending for me. I meant to try and get back to it this month, but I doubt there'll be time.

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
What I meant was that in the overall pantheon of westerns, the Oscar-nominated group you listed, with some exceptions, generally doesn't compare with the auteurist classics at the top tier (e.g. Howard Hawks' and John Ford's finest westerns, Anthony Mann's westerns, including the five with James Stewart, some of Peckinpah's films, the Leones, Aldrich's VERA CRUZ, some of John Sturges' westerns, etc.).
It's certainly odd that some-most of those weren't at least nominated, you're right.

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
(Oh, and BTW, MIDNIGHT COWBOY is not a western!)
Sure it is. He has a hat and boots and everything...!
Old 02-20-13, 12:56 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by shadokitty
Watched the Disney Swiss Family Robinson yesterday onb tv, thinking it qualified as I remember seeing somewhere that it qualified. Little did I know that the one that qualified was one that I didn't even know existed, the 1940 RKO version. So if it wasn't for the fact that I enjoy the movie anyways, and I am looking for action or adventure films to warm up for the Action/Adventure Challenge, it would have been a wasted watch.
I sympathise with that - I've had Gaslight written on my list of Amazon-available films since the start of the month, but when I got to it yesterday it was the wrong one. Now I'm wracking my brain as to whether the right one has simply ceased to be free, or if I made a mistake in the first place.
Old 02-20-13, 01:05 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
My #1 is Batman...
Good start!

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
...and I have The Transformers: The Movie at #8.
Oh, dear...!

I think I need to see that again with older eyes. I tried to watch it about ten years ago, and despite watching it with one of the biggest Transformers fans going, and him pointing out particularly good bits and singing its praises, it became one of a very small handful of films that I just couldn't sit through (at the time).

But that's high enough praise from a person whose opinions I've come to respect that I think I'll have to give it another go sometime.

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
My point here is to never fret over what anyone has to say about your taste, or about you based on your taste. You respond to whatever it is that you respond to, however it is that you respond to it. That's all any of us do. I've been left cold by lots of highly acclaimed, popular movies. C'est la vie.
Ultimately, I agree completely. I don't really care what people think of my tastes - if I did, I'd a) stay quiet more often, and b) swiftly dispose of some of my discs! - but I still feel... what's the best way to put it? maybe it's 'a little uneasy' when confronted with particularly good arguments for things that just pass me by completely. I also try to subllimate my own tastes sometimes (particularly, now I've found this place and the Challenges, during Criterion and Oscar) in order to watch something(s) that I wouldn't deliberately seek out at any other time.

And, pleasantly, I've been fairly surprised at how much I've enjoyed things that wouldn't otherwise have been on my radar.
Old 02-20-13, 01:10 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by KaBluie
I just watched Murder, Inc. (1960) on Fox Movie Channel On Demand and they interrupted it half way through to show a commercial to advertise how their movies are shown without commercial interruption.
That's even more ironic than the piracy-inducing lengthy unskippable anti-piracy adverts on DVDs that have finally seemed to disappear.
Old 02-20-13, 01:13 AM
  #274  
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Giles
Cinderella is the worst, those mice just drive me up the walls - oh how I wish the cat had eaten just one of them.
The voices are ghastly, they're essentially the only sexist part of the film*, but the names are arguably worse - "Gus" is a name. "Gus Gus" sounds more like a disease...




*I've been reading around Cinderella because it seems to take a lot of flak for being a bad influence on young girls - and I'm largely baffled why. Sexism seems to be a key charge leveled at it.
Old 02-20-13, 01:21 AM
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Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
I will never forgive the Academy for picking "Beauty and the Beast" over "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You". Never.
It's a good film. Deserving even of it's Proper Best Picture nomination. But it is not a particularly good song. "Be Our Guest" is much better, Bryan Adams' years-long chart topper got old through overplay, but that aside is indeed also much better.

--ooOoo--

A couple of days ago I saw Around the World in 80 Days for the first time in years. I did not remember it being quite as witty and amusing as it was - and at the time, I did not realise quite how many famous (and sometimes sadly forgotten) faces pop up, too. What was really interesting was listening to the brief introduction by Robert Osborne which claimed that Todd created the term "cameo role" for the film in large part to rebrand the possibly-more-accurate term "small role," and thereby attract those big stars to roles they would never otherwise have taken!

(Minor aside: How many other films have intermission music built into their runtime? Monty Python and the Holy Grail is one, and several have breaks, but was it at all common for others have musical interludes - and "Exit Music"...?)

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