Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > DVD Discussions > DVD Talk
Reload this Page >

The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

DVD Talk Talk about DVDs and Movies on DVD including Covers and Cases

The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Old 02-13-13, 06:06 AM
  #226  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Warren, MI
Posts: 5,980
Received 144 Likes on 99 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Watched Running on Empty last night and I think this is my favorite Sidney Lumet film (and that man made a lot of wonderful films). Seriously, every single time I watch Empty I am reduced to tears. The performances were just perfect and the restaurant scene between Christine Lahti and Steven Hill just breaks my heart. The Best Supporting Actor category was tough that year and its hard to fault the academy for going with Kevin Kline but River Phoenix just nailed it - I bet the voters thought Phoenix had tons of Oscar worthy performances in his future but things didn't work out that way.
Old 02-13-13, 06:23 AM
  #227  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Ash Ketchum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 12,646
Received 280 Likes on 215 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Watched some iconic once-in-a-lifetime performances for this challenge over the past week.

A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE (1951) – Brando and Leigh…the pinnacle of screen acting. These two become their characters and draw you in like nothing I’ve ever seen. Leigh won the Oscar, Brando lost out to Bogart in THE AFRICAN QUEEN. I can understand that vote because the voters somehow knew that it was Bogart’s only chance at an Oscar and Brando would have other chances. But still, Brando should have won simply because his performance outshone everything else that year and everything else that came before it.

REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (1955) – James Dean as a confused teenager. Has anybody else ever got this kind of character so right in a mainstream Hollywood melodrama? Dean was definitely ahead of his time here and the other actors, esp. Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo, are excellent, too. I was lucky to see my first screening of this when I was 18 and it could have maximum impact on me. And it was on the big screen, too, with director Nicholas Ray on hand to do a Q&A afterwards. Unforgettable.

THE GRAPES OF WRATH (1940) – Henry Fonda as Tom Joad, Okie, ex-con, would-be labor activist. Just look at the way he walks, talks and moves in this. There's nothing Hollywood about it. John Steinbeck was reportedly thrilled with Fonda’s portrayal of his novel’s protagonist. One of the most honest treatments of poverty in Hollywood history and almost semi-documentary in places. And one of the most pro-government New Deal anti-capitalist films to come out of Hollywood. Hard to believe John Ford would align himself with Hollywood’s staunch anti-communist conservative branch seven years later. Fonda lost the Best Actor Oscar that year to his friend James Stewart who, hard to believe, won for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY, which is more Cary Grant's picture than Stewart's.

SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950) – Gloria Swanson as onetime silent star Norma Desmond. For the first time I felt as I was watching it that this was a horror film in the true sense of the word. She really is a monster and the film definitely looks forward to both PSYCHO and WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? Desmond’s mansion turns out to be as deadly for the protagonist as the Bates Motel. (Norma/Norman?)

Oh, and I caught something in GRAPES OF WRATH that really surprised me. When Tom Joad is trying to jack up the front of the truck to change a tire, he yells to his mother, who's sitting on the fender, "Get the hell off'a there, Ma, it's heavy enough as it is." I find it hard to believe that the censors would have let that through. It must not have been in the script and they must not have caught it when watching it.

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 02-13-13 at 10:27 AM.
Old 02-13-13, 11:27 AM
  #228  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
davidh777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Home of 2013 NFL champion Seahawks
Posts: 52,791
Received 1,042 Likes on 859 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by ntnon
...where do you see notes like that, please?

(Actually, do you mean you only have five days left, or the movie only had five days left?)
Sorry I missed your question earlier. The Amazon Prime app on my 360 said "five days left" when I was scrolling through my watchlist. I assume it meant the movie had only five days left in Prime window, as I think the only reason I would be on a timetable would be if I had rented it. Sure enough, the movie is now showing as $2.99 on Amazon rental.

Originally Posted by ntnon
I wondered, towards the end of American whether Gene Kelly had a contractual obligation to provide some sort of out-of-continuity dream-sequence-y dance number in all of his films that showcased his talent but really did nothing for the plot..?! So far this month (and I don't think I've seen many more of his films for a decade - if ever - to compare further) I've seen Singin' in the Rain and Anchors Aweigh as well as now An American in Paris. Singin' has the Cyd Charisse number that I didn't remember from watching it years ago, but - despite being heavily featured in the trailer - is really, really annoying! It's so far removed from the film as to be utterly tangential even to tangents - it's nothing more than a dream sequence within an extended preview for the musical retooling of the re-recorded silent film within the actual film. That's about four degrees removed from the action! And it goes on, and on and on... It is also almost the only low point (for me) in an otherwise near-perfect film, which really colours my viewing of it and thinking about it, because at any other point it would be very interesting and well done. Likewise, the dance with Jerry (of Tom & Jerry) within Anchors Aweigh is very well done, for what must be a relatively early live/animated hybrid scene... but it's utterly pointless, and really bizarre! It happens because Kelly's character decides not to tell a classroom-full of children how he REALLY won his medal, but instead to tell them that King Jerry gave it to him for introducing dance back into a cartoon kingdom. Which is far beyond strange.

Now, An American in Paris. Not a bad film - although I'm not entirely sure it's better enough than the others to win Best Picture - but then the last quarter of hour is just filler. As in Mary Poppins (but without the plot necessity), the character(s) head into paintings, here just to dance in Kelly's characters' artwork. It's interesting, it's technically well-done, but he's spent large parts of the film dancing, so it's not strictly needed to show off his talents - neither is the Singin' number, although Anchors might have needed it. It's just there, ostensibly, to give time for a character to come to their senses. So it could possibly be said to be useful to the plot, but... it's an odd trend!
As much as I like musicals, I tend to FF through the dream ballet sequences of this era. They're interesting to watch but don't have great replay value for me.

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
Ntnon, you really, really need to wean yourself off of your attachment to plot. You're not supposed to watch Gene Kelly musicals for the plot, you watch them for the singing and dancing!!! And the sets...and costumes...and colors...and musical arrangements...not to mention attractive leading ladies. The total experience. Learn to live in the moment. (Don't feel bad about my scolding--I have this same argument with friends and family members all the time. And they usually ignore me.)

You should see Kelly's THE PIRATE (1948) next. Great songs, great dancing, but it also has a more intricate plot than the others. And its dream pirate dance sequence actually has a dramatic purpose. And then...ON THE TOWN (1949). Both had Oscar noms.
I agree with Ash, like when people complain about plot in an Astaire-Rogers musical. I didn't have much fondness for The Pirate when first I saw it a few years ago, even though I'm a fan of both Kelly and Garland and their teaming in For Me and My Gal and Summer Stock. I should watch it again someday, I guess.

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
A little while ago, I re-watched Up in the Air. Here are my observations, as shared in my Letterboxd diary:

MILD SPOILERS FOR ANYONE READING EMAILS


Up in the Air
82nd Academy Awards (2010)
(N) ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE -- George Clooney {"Ryan Bingham"}
(N) ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE -- Vera Farmiga {"Alex Goran"}
(N) ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE -- Anna Kendrick {"Natalie Keener"}
(N) DIRECTING -- Jason Reitman
(N) BEST PICTURE -- Daniel Dubiecki, Ivan Reitman and Jason Reitman, Producers
(N) WRITING (Adapted Screenplay) -- Screenplay by Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner
I finally saw Up in the Air--really good. I was kind of confused by the end credits, though.
Spoiler:
The terminated employee who talks about jumping off a bridge is now a regular in Castle, but she seems to be uncredited in Up in the Air. That's weird because they have a group credit for Terminated Employees, and since she actually had a name, I'd think she'd be credited.
Old 02-13-13, 04:02 PM
  #229  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
mrcellophane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Norman, OK
Posts: 1,718
Received 76 Likes on 44 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by MinLShaw
The point of a comparison isn't equation; it's to expose and explore the differences. This is why I love using Flickchart. It's way too easy to only compare similar movies. General consensus holds that The Phantom Menace is inferior to The Empire Strikes Back, but what happens when you compare it with My Big Fat Greek Wedding? Those kinds of cross-genre/cross-era comparisons demand some scrutiny and thought and they lead you to different realizations about each film.

Expanding that to five (or more) films as they do with Best Picture gets to the core of what we look for in movies. Film A may be obviously superior on technical ways (better cinematography, more elaborate production design, etc.) but perhaps Film B resonates more with you on an emotional level. Film C may be more thought provoking than either. So it goes, and at the end of it all the voter is left picking the film with the intrinsic qualities that are most satisfying relative to the others.

Or, they vote for whatever they're pressured to vote for by their employers if you're into that line of thought about awards.
Stop being so damn smart!!! Points taken. Your right that it takes a higher level of scrutiny and critical thought to compare those films and work out points of comparison and what aspects you value more. I still find it very difficult to rate and compare wildly different films. I have such different criteria for different genres as well as a hierarchy of form and narratives. And these are all evolving and changing as I familiarize myself with more and more films and narratives.

Also, I choose to believe that no one is ever pressured and everyone votes with their heart! ... Of course, I also believe that my composition students are going to enjoy writing their major papers and that people are generally generous and sincere, so I'm a pretty naive person!


Originally Posted by Mao
Have you seen "The Master" yet?

I truly believe that PTA can do no wrong! Even at his most "non-sensical", his work is more interesting than most drivel being shoveled today....
I haven't yet. It's on my list! I'm a huge fan. Magnolia is one of my favorite films.
Old 02-14-13, 12:58 AM
  #230  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by shadokitty
While no Universal Dracula films are eligible for this challenge that I am aware of, since Bride of Frankenstein is eligible, I think I may watch that sometime during this challenge to get my Universal monster fix. I think it is the only classic horror that I know of that is eligible for this challenge, at least that I own. On another note, just got an office chair today, so can be comfortable when streaming movies at my computer now.
If you have the multi-film Legacy Collections, I think all the Invisible Man films (bar, somewhat ironically, The Invisible Man!) are eligible. ..Returns, Woman and Agent were all nominated for Special Effects.

Also, Phantom of the Opera (1943).

Last edited by ntnon; 02-14-13 at 02:16 AM.
Old 02-14-13, 01:17 AM
  #231  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
Ntnon, you really, really need to wean yourself off of your attachment to plot. You're not supposed to watch Gene Kelly musicals for the plot, you watch them for the singing and dancing!!! And the sets...and costumes...and colors...and musical arrangements...not to mention attractive leading ladies. The total experience. Learn to live in the moment. (Don't feel bad about my scolding--I have this same argument with friends and family members all the time. And they usually ignore me.)
Pfft.

I prefer my musicals to be random-acts-of-singing during the course of (otherwise-)normal events. It's not per se a hangup on plot, just a sense that it's... well, cheating to leave the action just to showcase something that's already there in spades!

Take Singin' in the Rain. Nevermind the titular song-and-dance (which is excellent whether or not it was one take), Moses Supposes is a superb (even if Kelly nearly slips over on a piece of trash) masterclass in dance. Make 'em Laugh is hilarious and so technically diverse as to be beyond most numbers in most musicals. In the Morning is just so happy and joyful, and fits so well into the - yes - plot, that it's a highlight almost as good as the cake-bursting number. (I could very easily believe that Kelly's slow smile is genuine, and it makes the romantic subplot - usually the low point of most films, since it's so often unbelievable, unnecessary or distracting - seem very real.) The mishmash showcasing SOUND on FILM! is great, and even the main "Broadway Rhythm" song-and-dance is fairly good, and the skip through the Follies is brilliant, but - Cyd Charisse's appearance aside - the rest of the dream-within-a-dream sequence is very, very dull. And extraneous to the plot and pointless. It's balletic, it's veils and it's oddly linked to the mafia. Very strange!

Incidentally, watching On the Town today, I literally thought to myself "Huh. No dream sequence this time..." as Gene Kelly saw the poster for the play he then imagined. Contractual obligation, surely!

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
You should see Kelly's THE PIRATE (1948) next. Great songs, great dancing, but it also has a more intricate plot than the others. And its dream pirate dance sequence actually has a dramatic purpose.
Way back at the end of January! But I'd forgotten it - and it's dream sequence!

I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as his others, perhaps (ironically, re: your comment) because I wasn't actually as impressed by the dancing. But then I must be several shades of philistine!

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
And then...ON THE TOWN (1949). Both had Oscar noms.
Way ahead of you. "Prehistoric Man," which is a clip that I've seen dozens of times, is... almost beyond words. The look between Kelly and Sinatra when Ann "REALLY love(s) bearskins" cracks me up every time. Just to keep the tone low and cement my uncouthness.
Old 02-14-13, 01:34 AM
  #232  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by mrcellophane
I think the 2006 Academy Awards showed an essential problem with awarding a "Best Picture." Comparing films is often like comparing apples and oranges or domestic felines and a really nice piano concerto. While I really enjoy Crash and use it as a teaching aide every year, in my opinion Brokeback Mountain is a better film. However, how can you really compare the two?
Oh, quite. Although at least those two are dramas - comparing a musical to a comedy to a drama to a... well, you can't. That's why it surprises - and interests - me to see which films won (or didn't) picture and director or picture and screenplay. IF the Academy get it right and weigh the correct factors, it is possible to say that THIS is a "better film" than THAT, or that this was better directed. I suspect, though, that too many extraneous factors (subject, actors, tone, personal opinion) cloud the issue - and that's hardly a novel idea - for too many voters.

Originally Posted by mrcellophane
Anyway, I will stop rambling, and you should check out Brokeback Mountain which is a visual treat and tells a very emotional story. (It's also the film that made me love Anne Hathaway.)
I hope to, but a) it's not free on Amazon, b) I have no money, and c) our library system is not particularly strong on ANY DVDs, and certainly not... I'll say "controversial" ones. (It's a really weird selection both locally and in the adjoining areas... really odd. Also near-impossible to search, since the cataloguing system is utterly, utterly atrocious.)



Originally Posted by mrcellophane
It's always interesting to me to hear others opinions on films. That's one of the great things about the Awards season. Everyone is watching the same things and discussing them. I remember when I was watching a lot of nominated films with friends for the 2008 Academy Awards, and I was the sole person championing There Will Be Blood while everyone else was either indifferent or intensely disliked it. We got into heavy discussion about the film. That's the reason I love the Oscars! (I still believe that it is one of the best films about America. My best friend still believes it is nonsensical and awkwardly plotted. I haven't gotten a chance to watch my BD copy yet... perhaps next week!)
I want to watch that, too.






Hm. A little test. Search for "There Will Be Blood" on the library system. Returns...

"India : a portrait" by French, Patrick;
"Dead reckoning" by Harris, Charlaine;
"Forbidden" by Dekker, Ted;
"Gossip girl. The complete second season" [DVD];
"The cove" [DVD];
"What to expect when you're expecting" (!!!)...

...ah, there it is. #10 on a list of 18 implausibly-unrelated titles. Wonder if they'll get it in before next (next) weekend?
Old 02-14-13, 01:38 AM
  #233  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Trevor
Also saw Silver Lining Playbook in the theater. Walked into it literally blind, and loved it.
..."literally"-literally..?
Old 02-14-13, 01:46 AM
  #234  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by davidh777
Sorry I missed your question earlier. The Amazon Prime app on my 360 said "five days left" when I was scrolling through my watchlist. I assume it meant the movie had only five days left in Prime window, as I think the only reason I would be on a timetable would be if I had rented it. Sure enough, the movie is now showing as $2.99 on Amazon rental.
Well, [expletive]. That's worth knowing... there appears (although I suppose I might just have not watched the 'right' film) to be no such notification on either PS3 or iPad. Or the Amazon website.

I think we have a 360 somewhere, though, so I suppose it might be worth hooking it up for that feature alone!

Originally Posted by davidh777
As much as I like musicals, I tend to FF through the dream ballet sequences of this era. They're interesting to watch but don't have great replay value for me.
That's basically my feeling, although I do try so hard not to skip them...!

Originally Posted by davidh777
I agree with Ash, like when people complain about plot in an Astaire-Rogers musical.
I would try and differentiate - although it's something of a personal preference where the lines are drawn, I suppose - between films that really are just a string of dances and those that try to meld dance numbers into a plot that could otherwise hold together reasonably well without them. Mary Poppins (obviously) and Singin' in the Rain could be decent films without any music or dance; others less so.

Originally Posted by davidh777
I finally saw Up in the Air--really good.
I'd like to see that, but my reasons for not being able to are identical to Brokeback Mountain above. (It's missing from the library system though for 'reasons unknown', unless it was deeply controversial behind the articles I read about it.)
Old 02-14-13, 01:50 AM
  #235  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by mrcellophane
Stop being so damn smart!!! Points taken. Your right that it takes a higher level of scrutiny and critical thought to compare those films and work out points of comparison and what aspects you value more. I still find it very difficult to rate and compare wildly different films. I have such different criteria for different genres as well as a hierarchy of form and narratives. And these are all evolving and changing as I familiarize myself with more and more films and narratives.
Yes, aside from the already given (by others) reasons against taking on the enormity of one of these ratings/chart things, I find it hard to even begin to compare the truly diverse. I can almost, if pushed, try to formulate a star rating, but find it usually tends to be 1-, 3- or 5- out of five, or similar: Bad, Average or Excellent.

Plus my favourites tend to rotate or be more of less favoured in different contexts and times. I can often come up with a top ten (although I usually subsequently remember half-a-dozen that should have replaced one or added to the list), but I try not to even think about ranking them #1, #2, #3 and #4 because it's so much more than that.

Also, I fear that the (snobs) smart people would sneer at me if I rated some great films poorly.

Last edited by ntnon; 02-14-13 at 02:15 AM.
Old 02-14-13, 02:12 AM
  #236  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

I'm feeling quite pleased with myself today - I've now seen all of this year's "Best Animated" films. Wreck-It Ralph I saw before the challenge began (also, Brave, although I've re-watched it within these confines), and it remains tied for my favourite.

ParaNorman was the one I saw today, and I find it interesting that there are two Halloween-y, living-dead-for-children films competing against each other. Makes it easier to compare them like-for-like, too! Frankenweenie and Pirates! were stop-motion, too, so there are points of technical comparison there.

Without wanting to fall into the awful trap of equating "animation" with "for kids," it's clear that that is going to be the primary audience for such films. Which makes it more interesting that there are two fairly scary ones, one rather whimsical, one very retro, and... Brave, a hemi-semi-Princess movie. That is itself fairly dark - in tone as well as literal look.

Brave was the most out-and-out-amusing; Ralph the most referentially-clever. None had particularly twisty plots, although Pirates was off-the-wall enough to be novel (probably more so, had I not read the book years ago) and the end of Norman was a little surprising. Ralph was easily the lightest, perhaps even the most easily enjoyable, but after watching (most of) the special features for Norman, I am newly impressed with the attention-to-detail and sheer effort that goes into stop motion. The idea of making hundreds of thousands of faces in order to animate the split seconds between facial expressions is mind-boggling. Wallace and Grommit and Morph prodded the plasticine; nowadays it's all computers, CAD and 3D printing thousands of near-identical parts..!

I enjoyed them all (Frankenweenie probably the least, because it seemed so much more obviously formulaic), and I would be reasonably happy with any of them winning because the designs and plots were reasonably different (Frank and Norman's supernatural-reanimation-"weird"-ness aside). I tend to think Brave should - and will - win.
Old 02-14-13, 08:58 AM
  #237  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 819
Received 72 Likes on 51 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Others have commented on this but the amount of time dedicated to most movies watched for this challenge is amazing. I have watched 21 items, one of which was a 6 minute cartoon and one that was a 19 minute short and I still have watched over 42 hours, an average of over 2 hours per item. And what is truly amazing is that the vast majority of that time has been watching very entertaining, thoughtful movies. I may look forward to the Horror and Action Challenges more, but it just may be that the Academy Award Challenge has the most enjoyment per hour!
Old 02-14-13, 10:04 AM
  #238  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Ash Ketchum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 12,646
Received 280 Likes on 215 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

It's been hard to get my western fix this month, since so few were nominated for Oscars. Thank God for Eastwood. I watched THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES (1976) for the first time in many years and was pleased to see how well it held up. And, now I can say I've seen an eligible film from each decade from the 1920s to the 1970s. Still have the '80s, 90s and 2010s to go, but I did the 2000s with SPIRITED AWAY.

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 02-14-13 at 10:22 AM.
Old 02-14-13, 10:59 AM
  #239  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by orlmac
Others have commented on this but the amount of time dedicated to most movies watched for this challenge is amazing. I have watched 21 items, one of which was a 6 minute cartoon and one that was a 19 minute short and I still have watched over 42 hours, an average of over 2 hours per item. And what is truly amazing is that the vast majority of that time has been watching very entertaining, thoughtful movies. I may look forward to the Horror and Action Challenges more, but it just may be that the Academy Award Challenge has the most enjoyment per hour!
I agree - and it's VERY reassuring to read that, since it's basically an affirmation of the accuracy of the Awards to be effectively saying that the winning and nominated films are, overall, more entertaining than those not.
Old 02-14-13, 11:25 AM
  #240  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
It's been hard to get my western fix this month, since so few were nominated for Oscars. Thank God for Eastwood. I watched THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES (1976) for the first time in many years and was pleased to see how well it held up. And, now I can say I've seen an eligible film from each decade from the 1920s to the 1970s. Still have the '80s, 90s and 2010s to go, but I did the 2000s with SPIRITED AWAY.
I thought that too, but then I looked into it! And there are quite a few: Cimarron, In Old Arizona, The Cowboy and the Lady, Stagecoach, The Westerner, The Paleface, Annie Get Your Gun, High Noon, Calamity Jane, Shane, Oklahoma!, The Alamo, How the West Was Won, Hud, Cat Ballou, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Midnight Cowboy, True Grit...

That's just winners - The Wild Bunch and The Magnificent Seven are two that were nominated but didn't win - and only up to 1970, which is as far as I could be bothered to look when I realised how many there were! There's also the more recent True Grit.

(North West Mounted Police sounded Western-y to me, but Wikipedia suggests not..)
Old 02-14-13, 11:32 AM
  #241  
DVD Talk Godfather
 
davidh777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Home of 2013 NFL champion Seahawks
Posts: 52,791
Received 1,042 Likes on 859 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

I think it was a year or two ago when I wasted a first-time watch on Rio Bravo, figuring it qualified somehow.

Oh all right, it wasn't a total waste because I enjoyed the movie and had been meaning to watch it for eons.
Old 02-14-13, 12:37 PM
  #242  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Ash Ketchum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 12,646
Received 280 Likes on 215 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by ntnon
I thought that too, but then I looked into it! And there are quite a few: Cimarron, In Old Arizona, The Cowboy and the Lady, Stagecoach, The Westerner, The Paleface, Annie Get Your Gun, High Noon, Calamity Jane, Shane, Oklahoma!, The Alamo, How the West Was Won, Hud, Cat Ballou, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Midnight Cowboy, True Grit...

That's just winners - The Wild Bunch and The Magnificent Seven are two that were nominated but didn't win - and only up to 1970, which is as far as I could be bothered to look when I realised how many there were! There's also the more recent True Grit.

(North West Mounted Police sounded Western-y to me, but Wikipedia suggests not..)
Yeah, but that's a pretty weak lot overall, except for a few of them and I've seen most of them ad infinitem. But I DO have HUD and my Blu-ray of THE WILD BUNCH on my stack of priorities.

NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE probably counts since Gary Cooper plays a Texas Ranger and wears a cowboy hat throughout, but it's not a very good movie.
Old 02-14-13, 12:52 PM
  #243  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Warren, MI
Posts: 5,980
Received 144 Likes on 99 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Being the hopeless romantic I am, I'm going for some holiday appropriate films starting with The Towering Inferno. 1974 was good film year in the Best Picture race with Inferno, Godfather II, The Conversation, and Chinatown. Couldn't go wrong with any of those titles. I haven't seen Lenny yet so maybe I'll put that in next year's queue.
Old 02-14-13, 01:29 PM
  #244  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
The Man with the Golden Doujinshi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Mister Peepers
Posts: 7,882
Likes: 0
Received 5 Likes on 5 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

I don't know how many Criterions are eligible for this challenge but

From today, February 14, through Monday, February 18, all of the Criterion titles streaming on Hulu Plus, available to viewers in the U.S., will be free of charge to nonsubscribers (with advertisements)
Old 02-14-13, 07:28 PM
  #245  
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Warren, MI
Posts: 5,980
Received 144 Likes on 99 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Continuing my ode to Valentine’s Day, I watched Se7en. This film has one of the coolest opening credit sequences. I was reading the film’s trivia page on imdb and was surprised to read that Fincher originally wanted Denzel Washington to play Mills. First, kudos to Fincher to wanting two black leads in his film. Someone mentioned that Bad Boys was the first mainstream (read non-black) film to feature two black male leads and that was released the same year as Se7en. I tried to think of an earlier film but couldn’t come up with one. Second, I’m kinda glad Washington passed on this b/c I don’t think he would have worked in that role. Mills is na´ve and somewhat ignorant and Washington’s screen presence has never portrayed that at all. It always amuses me when people claim that this film is horribly violent and they never believe me when I tell them that only one murder occurs on screen. Speaking of death and destruction, I have a theory about the ending. I know I am in a teeny tiny minority of folks who interpret the ending in this way but here goes:
Spoiler:
I swear that before Mills pops a cap in John Doe, Somerset insinuates that if you murder a suspect that the officer in question could/would get the death penalty (highlighted by the fact that Somerset says murder instead of kill). I assumed Doe knew this and not only wanted Mills to murder him but understood that Mills would also die thus forcing the State to complete his masterpiece.


Speaking of Denzel, I have just enough time left in the evening to watch another one of my all-time favorite films: A Soldier's Story.
Old 02-14-13, 09:29 PM
  #246  
Moderator
 
Giles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 33,630
Received 17 Likes on 13 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

watched a movie with no knowledge about it - just that it starred Marlene Dietrich called 'The Garden of Allah' - I'm notorious for crying during the end of made for TV Hallmark movies - but I thought the ending of this was devastating. Aside from the overbearing non-stop music score (which oddly was it was nominated for), all the other elements, plot, characters, beautiful cinematography (THIS is what it should be nominated for) and a color film from the mid 1930's had me riveted - a complete and utter find of a film.
Old 02-15-13, 04:05 AM
  #247  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,444
Received 85 Likes on 48 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Ash Ketchum
Yeah, but that's a pretty weak lot overall, except for a few of them and I've seen most of them ad infinitem. But I DO have HUD and my Blu-ray of THE WILD BUNCH on my stack of priorities.
Oh, well, I guess I'm 'lucky' then - barely seen any of them!
Old 02-15-13, 06:09 AM
  #248  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Ash Ketchum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 12,646
Received 280 Likes on 215 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by Giles
watched a movie with no knowledge about it - just that it starred Marlene Dietrich called 'The Garden of Allah' - I'm notorious for crying during the end of made for TV Hallmark movies - but I thought the ending of this was devastating. Aside from the overbearing non-stop music score (which oddly was it was nominated for), all the other elements, plot, characters, beautiful cinematography (THIS is what it should be nominated for) and a color film from the mid 1930's had me riveted - a complete and utter find of a film.
THE GARDEN OF ALLAH was only the fourth feature ever made in 3-strip Technicolor. I'm lucky enough to have seen it on the big screen at Radio City Music Hall, of all places, during an Art Deco Festival in 1974. The three preceding Technicolor features were BECKY SHARP (1935), TRAIL OF THE LONESOME PINE (1936) and RAMONA (1936), all of which I managed to see on the big screen as well back in the '70s. With the exception of BECKY SHARP's Miriam Hopkins, the stars of all these films were still alive when I saw them and some of them (Henry Fonda, Sylvia Sidney, Fred MacMurray, Don Ameche) were still working in films and TV.

Last edited by Ash Ketchum; 02-15-13 at 06:24 AM.
Old 02-15-13, 06:16 AM
  #249  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Ash Ketchum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 12,646
Received 280 Likes on 215 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Originally Posted by ntnon
Oh, well, I guess I'm 'lucky' then - barely seen any of them!
Don't take my word for it. (Haven't you learned that here by now? ) They're important films and you should see them anyway, esp. the following:
CIMARRON, STAGECOACH, THE PALEFACE, HIGH NOON, SHANE, HOW THE WEST WAS WON, BUTCH CASSIDY, TRUE GRIT, and, of course, one of my all-time favorites, THE WILD BUNCH.
What I meant was that in the overall pantheon of westerns, the Oscar-nominated group you listed, with some exceptions, generally doesn't compare with the auteurist classics at the top tier (e.g. Howard Hawks' and John Ford's finest westerns, Anthony Mann's westerns, including the five with James Stewart, some of Peckinpah's films, the Leones, Aldrich's VERA CRUZ, some of John Sturges' westerns, etc.).

(Oh, and BTW, MIDNIGHT COWBOY is not a western!)
Old 02-15-13, 08:11 AM
  #250  
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 8,388
Received 164 Likes on 121 Posts
Re: The 7th Annual Academy Award Movie Challenge (1/24 - 2/24)

Watched the Disney Swiss Family Robinson yesterday onb tv, thinking it qualified as I remember seeing somewhere that it qualified. Little did I know that the one that qualified was one that I didn't even know existed, the 1940 RKO version. So if it wasn't for the fact that I enjoy the movie anyways, and I am looking for action or adventure films to warm up for the Action/Adventure Challenge, it would have been a wasted watch.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.