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31 Films in 31 Days - Horror Challenge Subset

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31 Films in 31 Days - Horror Challenge Subset

Old 10-27-08, 10:45 PM
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Pit and the Pendulum

Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
Dimension X, you're up!
I don't want to take too much time out from watching movies, so instead of trying to type an in-depth review here, I'll comment on what's been posted so far and maybe throw in a few of my own thoughts at the end.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
The very end was interesting, but when did they put something over Elizabeth's mouth? Also, from what the inside of the cage looked like before they put her in it, it looked like she would have had plenty of room to use her hands to take off anything that was on her mouth.
Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
They didn't show him putting her in the device fully, but I can easily presume that he at some point gagged her, and bound her to prevent her from screaming.
Like Trevor said, they don't actually show him putting her in the cage. Nicholas knocks out the doctor, then he grabs Elizabeth and tells her she "will die in agony" and the camera pans to the cage. Then it cuts to the doctor waking up as we hear Elizabeth screaming. The doctor gets up and there's a cut back to Nicholas closing the cage.

If the pan to the cage was meant to represent several minutes passed, he could've tied her up during that time. Or it could just be a cheat. Either way, it's a great closing shot.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
Ah well, it was interesting, but not really my cup of tea. I have Tales of Terror recorded from HDNet Movies too, I'll check that out tonight.
Tales of Terror is another great one (I especially like the Black Cat / Cask of Amontillado segment with Peter Lorre - "For the love of God, Montresor!"). Hope you enjoyed it.
Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
I'm a huge fan of Edgar Allan Poe, and of Vincent Price, but went into this film expecting it to be rubbish. Perhaps this is unwarranted, but I thought that Roger Corman movies were always bad.
Corman made a bunch of crappy films, but he made some really good ones too (mostly around the time he made this one). I'd recommend any of his "Poe Pictures," and X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes and The Intruder. And if you have the DVDs, you should give a listen to Roger Corman's commentaries on the "Poe Pictures."
Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
Was shocked to find this film both entertaining and well crafted. The Poe story was only a few pages, so they understandably had to add a lot of material to make a feature length film out of it. The screenplay, by the always capable Richard Matheson, does a fine job of sounding like Poe.

The camera work, including some interesting angles and tinting, suggests to me that it influenced some of the Italian horror masters, although I am not well enough schooled in them to comment perhaps. Nice use of music and colors as well.

Cast was very good, Price slightly hammy, but then again, he often is, part of his charm perhaps.

Loved the ending, and the creepiness and scares were well placed throughout the film.
I really enjoy the sequence leading up to the reveal of the mystery. It begins with Price putting out candles in his room when he hears Barbara Steele calling out "Nicholas." Then he follows her voice, descending into the lower depths of the castle while simultaneously descending into madness. Then she crawls out of the crypt, sending him even further down, into the torture chamber and into complete madness.

Last edited by Dimension X; 10-27-08 at 10:50 PM.
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Old 10-28-08, 09:05 AM
  #202  
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THE INNOCENTS (1961)

My first viewing of the THE INNOCENTS was at the AFI’s Silver Theatre and obviously the most ideal way to experience this film in all it’s wide screen splendor. For this year’s challenge I decided this film to be viewed by all interested, and in my instance to view the British Film Institute’s special edition DVD with commentary from Professor Christopher Frayling. Detailed next is what I learned about the production of this film.

- The film was based on the Henry James story ‘The Turn of the Screw’, the play ‘The Innocents’ by William Archibald (where the ghosts were established as being actually real and interacting with the children, the title also in play form attributed ‘The Innocents’ as being all of the four central characters something which becomes quickly apparent in the film as well), with screen adaptation by the third writer Truman Capote, who is credited to bringing 90% of material to the film. Including the recurring images of reflections: mirrors, windows, the lake. Capote also included the aspect of the animals – Rupert the turtle, the beetle that is seen exiting the mouth of the sculpture in the garden. The ‘southern gothic’ feel to the story and the Freudian aspects: the tower: Quint: male, the lake: Miss Jessel: woman. The only flaw Capote felt he contributed to the film was the ‘tear’ of Miss Jessel, he wanted to be less ‘real’ and more abstract.

- THE INNOCENTS was one of the first films to not feature the standard FOX studio fanfare before the film starts.

- This was the second Cinemascope feature for cinematographer Freddie Francis, the first one being SONS AND LOVERS The film effectively implements a multitude of effects, deep focus, edges purposefully fogged out, tunnel of light effects used by over excessive lighting. Visuals eluded to other films included CITIZEN KANE, and VERTIGO. All except one scene were bridged by dissolves.

- Director Clayton wanted Cary Grant to play the role of the Uncle.

- Clayton wanted to direct THE INNOCENTS to distance himself and his films that attributed him to being a ‘New Wave/Realism’ film director.

- Originally the film was to open with the funeral of Miles, but wisely dropped. The film begins and ends with the same image of the praying hands. Interestingly the film was shot in January, but in the story took place in June. Interiors were shot at Shepperton Studios.

- Clayton himself identified personally with the character of Miles, since he himself had an absent father figure in his life. He also thought the lady ghost was far more effective than that of the ghost of ‘Quint’ – which he felt was too ‘Hammer-esque’. Clayton also personally found the locale of Bly House after seeing a travel magazine that featured Sheffield Park.

- Actor Martin Stephens (Miles) also played a son to Deborah Kerr’s character in the film COUNT YOUR BLESSINGS. Other notable screen performance from Martin included starring in VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED

- Pamela Franklin (Flora) was a trained ballerina before this movie and added authenticity to the two dancing scenes featured in the film.

- Clayton never gave the child actors the full script due to the film’s overall dark undertones/ elements of the story. Franklin didn’t see the final film until she was 16 years of age.

- Female actor Clytie Jessop also was cast in a second horror film lensed by Freddie Francis, TORTURE GARDEN.

- Two filming mistakes became integrated into the film, one a flock of pigeon’s effect that added an unintended surrealistic touch and the brief instance of a film clapper being present in a shot where Miss Giddens walks down the dark corridor of the house.

- The role of Miss Giddens in the story was supposed to be 20, Kerr herself was 40, the performance though negated this aspect all together. All the scenes in the entire film featured Kerr. Kerr herself noted that the role of Miss Giddens was her favourite in her film career. There are also five distinct dresses for the role of Miss Giddens

- Fox exes as well as audiences were shocked over the kiss scene between Miles and Miss Giddens. This film and its subject matter set itself apart from the standard horror film genre for its day and became an adult horror film for adult audiences.

- Both Clayton and Kerr agree that the ghost aspect of the film be bleak, obtuse and ambiguous and let the audience themselves decides what was real and unreal. Was Miles’ returning to the house what spurned the return of the ghosts, was it’s Miss Giddens – was she the medium that made the ghosts manifest, the hauntings are from her perspective, is the story a complete dream? Francois Truffaut literally noted to Clayton that ‘THE INNOCENTS’ was the best British Film since Alfred Hitchcock left for America’

Last edited by Giles; 10-28-08 at 09:21 AM.
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Old 10-28-08, 05:22 PM
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Thanks for the informative post. I saw Martin Stephens in a Hammer film, The Witches, during this month's challenge, and I must say it was somewhat strange to see him as a teenager. Still had that odd voice. According to IMDB, it was his final film role, as he retired to become an architect.
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Old 10-28-08, 07:15 PM
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Pit and the Pendulum revisisted

Alright. I watched Tales of Terror last night, which was another Corman picture made just a couple years after Pit and the Pendulum. I think experiencing two similar movies helped me baseline a little bit. I thought I'd revise some of my initial thoughts from yesterday.

First off, I'm not sure what I was thinking about with my comment about the woman bound and gagged at the end. Never, ever, do I make comments like that trying to pick apart movies. Unless it was a glaring error, I just take it for what it is. I'm surprised I even made that comment. Everything at the end works just perfectly.

Second, as I was watching Vincent Price in Tales of Terror, which had 3 different stories, I found myself completely addicted to him in the film. There is just something completely unique about his acting. He was great in all three stories and had 3 completely different roles, it was fantastic.

Third, I also want to expand my comments on being a Horror fan. I am a fan of cinema and television as a whole. This includes, of course, horror movies and television shows. So, being a fan of cinema, in general, I suppose it was pretty odd that I had never seen much Vincent Price or older material. I will definitely be expanding my collection to include some of the "classic" titles for next year. If anything, I have become more of a horror fan from this challenge (my first year participating.)

Next, someone mentioned about Corman. I kind of thought, also, that all of his movies were low-budget, "B" movies. I know this true, to an extent, but he is really one of the most revered people in modern movie history. I can't count how many times he has been mentioned in commentaries or on "thank you" credits in movies. Nevertheless, I was somewhat surprised that Pit and the Pendulum was directed by him. I also looked at his IMDB page, and it was kind of mind blowing how many films he's been a part of. Amazing.

As for Tales of Terror, definitely worth checking out. Part two was really good.
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Old 10-28-08, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
Paging Xage....

Listened to this with the producer/director commentary. Is it just me or did Sam Raimi sleep thru half of this? He seemed to only talk when the producer dragged comments out of him.
Yeah, I'm not sure what he was doing. I think he must had not seen the movie for a while. I know one time the producer said "Sam, what do you think about this scene?" There was a long pause and he started going into how he thought one of the cuts should have been different. I think he was picking apart his movie 18 years later. There REALLY needs to be a class on doing commentaries the right way. Step 1, watch the movie the night before. I mean the commentary wasn't terrible, but they could have really expanded on a lot of the scenes and gone into a little more about the different aspects of the film.
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Old 10-28-08, 07:44 PM
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Roger Corman

Another important thing to remember about Corman's importance to film is not only his bad and good films, or the careers he helped launch but the importance of New World Pictures.

Today New World is known mostly as a production company that made crap films, but it was also responsible for distributing many important foreign films to American audiences often films handpicked by Corman himself.

If you are wanting to enjoy Corman as a director forget about things like the Wasp Woman and Creature from the Haunted Sea, though they have a charm all their own, and instead watch films like Masque of the Red Death and X, good solid material.
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Old 10-28-08, 08:02 PM
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Innocents

I hadn't seen this movie in years, probably at least a dozen. I had seen the Dan Curtis Production of The Turn of the Screw within the last couple of years and while it isn't a poor adaptation it doesn't come close to this simply fantastic movie.

I won't say much other than it is creepy as hell and for all of you that may not have watched it you should do yourself a favor and pick up or rent a copy, it's really a great film.

I can't believe I took so long for me to watch this film again and thankfully because of this challenge I picked up a copy. I imagine it will make it into my regular circulation now.
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Old 10-29-08, 09:12 AM
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The Pit and the Pendulum

Originally Posted by clckworang View Post
A lot of good films came from Roger Corman.
The more I look, the more I agree and am ashamed of my earlier bias. I'm enjoying Dementia 13 as we "speak". Also really looking forward to seeing The Intruder one day. And his Humanoids from the Deep is a guilty pleasure.
Originally Posted by Dimension X View Post
I don't want to take too much time out from watching movies, so instead of trying to type an in-depth review here, I'll comment on what's been posted so far and maybe throw in a few of my own thoughts at the end.

I really enjoy the sequence leading up to the reveal of the mystery. It begins with Price putting out candles in his room when he hears Barbara Steele calling out "Nicholas." Then he follows her voice, descending into the lower depths of the castle while simultaneously descending into madness. Then she crawls out of the crypt, sending him even further down, into the torture chamber and into complete madness.
Nice comments, thanks. The more I think about it the more i really enjoyed this film. And yes, the ending sequence is well done, you can see his descent into madness as he descends into the depths.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
First off, I'm not sure what I was thinking about with my comment about the woman bound and gagged at the end. Never, ever, do I make comments like that trying to pick apart movies. Unless it was a glaring error, I just take it for what it is. I'm surprised I even made that comment. Everything at the end works just perfectly.
That did seem a little abrupt of you. No worries. I had similar thoughts about Horror of Dracula, but I'm still annoyed by that film. Which reminds me to post them here in a bit.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
Second, as I was watching Vincent Price in Tales of Terror, which had 3 different stories, I found myself completely addicted to him in the film. There is just something completely unique about his acting. He was great in all three stories and had 3 completely different roles, it was fantastic.
Sweet, I'm looking forward to that one, and the rest of my unwatched Price pile.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
Third, I also want to expand my comments on being a Horror fan. I am a fan of cinema and television as a whole. This includes, of course, horror movies and television shows. So, being a fan of cinema, in general, I suppose it was pretty odd that I had never seen much Vincent Price or older material. I will definitely be expanding my collection to include some of the "classic" titles for next year. If anything, I have become more of a horror fan from this challenge (my first year participating.)
Not saying this is you, but until the last couple of years, I was quite the modern and American film centrist, rarely watching anything older than 1970 or from any other country. But I slowly began to realize that when I did venture into those territories, I almost always enjoyed them more than my standard fare. So now I'm switching my buying habits up, and investing lots of money and time into Criterions and other older and/or foreign films.
Originally Posted by Numes View Post
Next, someone mentioned about Corman. I kind of thought, also, that all of his movies were low-budget, "B" movies. I know this true, to an extent, but he is really one of the most revered people in modern movie history. I can't count how many times he has been mentioned in commentaries or on "thank you" credits in movies. Nevertheless, I was somewhat surprised that Pit and the Pendulum was directed by him. I also looked at his IMDB page, and it was kind of mind blowing how many films he's been a part of. Amazing.
Originally Posted by poster mayhem View Post
Another important thing to remember about Corman's importance to film is not only his bad and good films, or the careers he helped launch but the importance of New World Pictures.

Today New World is known mostly as a production company that made crap films, but it was also responsible for distributing many important foreign films to American audiences often films handpicked by Corman himself.

If you are wanting to enjoy Corman as a director forget about things like the Wasp Woman and Creature from the Haunted Sea, though they have a charm all their own, and instead watch films like Masque of the Red Death and X, good solid material.
We all owe him a lot of thanks.
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Old 10-29-08, 09:27 AM
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Horror of Dracula

May have seen parts of this on TV over the years, but this was my first full viewing. Great performance by Peter Cushing! I really enjoyed it, but have two major complaints. I know that one could make these complaints on almost every horror movie, but they dampen this one quite a bit for me.

#1 - So Peter Cushing absolutely knows that vampires are real and powerful, and knows the foolproof ways to stop them. But does he come prepared? No. He carries one cross, which he purposely leaves before running after Count Dracula! What?! Are you serious? He is about to battle what he knows to be a powerful superhuman foe, and he purposely drops the only weapon he is carrying? And what the heck is he doing with only one weapon anyway? If I were him, I'd have crosses in every pocket, several around my neck, and heck, I'd have them tattooed all over my body. I'd also have garlic stuffed in all my clothes and at least 4 holstered stakes/mallets. I know that may be overkill for a movie, but other films have shown well-armed vampire hunters. What Peter Cushing did was just ridiculous.

#2 - And even worse, Count Dracula, an intelligent being hundreds of years old, knows he's very vulnerable when in his coffin during the day. Does he take any steps to protect this location? No. At his castle his coffin is simply in the back house, just inside an unlocked door. Then, after seeing that his enemies know this weakness and almost kill him in the coffin, he moves his coffin to the current home of the man who has vowed to kill him. If that isn't ridiculous enough, does he at least make a modest attempt to hide this coffin? No! It is plainly in sight just inside the unlocked basement door!

Holy crap! For an otherwise well-made and acted film, we have the stupidest hero and villain to ever appear in a movie.
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Old 10-29-08, 09:48 AM
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La Maschera del demonio (aka Black Sunday)

Really enjoyed this one last night. We've had a nice string of choices here the past 4 days. All truly excellent films, all off the mainstream, and all new to me (helping my ever growing unwatched pile a bit).

Way behind in my other comments, may post more later. But just wanted to get this started in case Chad or anyone else wanted to chime in.
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Old 10-30-08, 01:09 PM
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^Not much to say really, other than you probably won't find a film with a better Gothic atmosphere. It's a stylish and visually stunning film truly that's ahead of its time in terms of both special effects and cinematography. And god knows just how influential it was with modern directors.

Oh, and Barbara Steele's performance as the innocent virgin and demonic ancient witch is easily the best dual role portrayal since Jeremy Irons in "Dead Ringers", IMO.
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Old 10-30-08, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
May have seen parts of this on TV over the years, but this was my first full viewing. Great performance by Peter Cushing! I really enjoyed it, but have two major complaints. I know that one could make these complaints on almost every horror movie, but they dampen this one quite a bit for me.

#1 - So Peter Cushing absolutely knows that vampires are real and powerful, and knows the foolproof ways to stop them. But does he come prepared? No. He carries one cross, which he purposely leaves before running after Count Dracula! What?! Are you serious? He is about to battle what he knows to be a powerful superhuman foe, and he purposely drops the only weapon he is carrying? And what the heck is he doing with only one weapon anyway? If I were him, I'd have crosses in every pocket, several around my neck, and heck, I'd have them tattooed all over my body. I'd also have garlic stuffed in all my clothes and at least 4 holstered stakes/mallets. I know that may be overkill for a movie, but other films have shown well-armed vampire hunters. What Peter Cushing did was just ridiculous.

#2 - And even worse, Count Dracula, an intelligent being hundreds of years old, knows he's very vulnerable when in his coffin during the day. Does he take any steps to protect this location? No. At his castle his coffin is simply in the back house, just inside an unlocked door. Then, after seeing that his enemies know this weakness and almost kill him in the coffin, he moves his coffin to the current home of the man who has vowed to kill him. If that isn't ridiculous enough, does he at least make a modest attempt to hide this coffin? No! It is plainly in sight just inside the unlocked basement door!

Holy crap! For an otherwise well-made and acted film, we have the stupidest hero and villain to ever appear in a movie.
Good job Trevor, that was great stuff. You really had me rollin'
Just a small thing to add. I noticed when Dracula and his victims were sleeping at the castle in the beginning of the movie, that their coffins had no lids. That kind of seemed odd to me as they could be affected by sunlight while they were sleeping.
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Old 10-31-08, 02:48 PM
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I just made my 50th viewing, Sleepy Hollow.
That might be it for me for the challenge.
I may be able to sneak in one more before the deadline but the end is in sight.
It looks like 50 is it for me.
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Old 11-01-08, 08:15 AM
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The Innocents

Originally Posted by Giles View Post
For this year’s challenge I decided this film to be viewed by all interested, and in my instance to view the British Film Institute’s special edition DVD with commentary from Professor Christopher Frayling.
Oh, sounds great. Must start expanding my R2 library.
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
Originally the film was to open with the funeral of Miles, but wisely dropped. The film begins and ends with the same image of the praying hands.
Wow, glad they cut the funeral opening, can't imagine it without the opening/closing combo.
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
Actor Martin Stephens (Miles) also played a son to Deborah Kerr’s character in the film COUNT YOUR BLESSINGS. Other notable screen performance from Martin included starring in VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED
Sadly must admit that I'm still awaiting my first viewing of either of "The Damned" movies.
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
Clayton never gave the child actors the full script due to the film’s overall dark undertones/ elements of the story. Franklin didn’t see the final film until she was 16 years of age.
Great idea, hopefully this is done for many of the more adult subject matter movies.
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
Fox exes as well as audiences were shocked over the kiss scene between Miles and Miss Giddens. This film and its subject matter set itself apart from the standard horror film genre for its day and became an adult horror film for adult audiences.
Splendidly shocking scene.
Originally Posted by Giles View Post
Both Clayton and Kerr agree that the ghost aspect of the film be bleak, obtuse and ambiguous and let the audience themselves decides what was real and unreal. Was Miles’ returning to the house what spurned the return of the ghosts, was it’s Miss Giddens – was she the medium that made the ghosts manifest, the hauntings are from her perspective, is the story a complete dream? Francois Truffaut literally noted to Clayton that ‘THE INNOCENTS’ was the best British Film since Alfred Hitchcock left for America’
My only problem with the movie was that, to me, they kept things wonderfully ambiguous for much of the film, but the last 20 minutes departed from that.
Originally Posted by poster mayhem View Post
I won't say much other than it is creepy as hell and for all of you that may not have watched it you should do yourself a favor and pick up or rent a copy, it's really a great film.

I can't believe I took so long for me to watch this film again and thankfully because of this challenge I picked up a copy. I imagine it will make it into my regular circulation now.
Agreed. Will look for that R2 disc.
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Old 11-01-08, 08:36 AM
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La Maschera del demonio (aka Black Sunday)

Originally Posted by Chad View Post
^Not much to say really, other than you probably won't find a film with a better Gothic atmosphere. It's a stylish and visually stunning film truly that's ahead of its time in terms of both special effects and cinematography. And god knows just how influential it was with modern directors.

Oh, and Barbara Steele's performance as the innocent virgin and demonic ancient witch is easily the best dual role portrayal since Jeremy Irons in "Dead Ringers", IMO.
Have to agree with all that.

Thanks for getting me to watch my first Bava film Chad. Looks like many regard this one, his first as full director, as his best. I'm definitely looking forward to seeing more of his stuff.

Loved "meeting" star Barbara Steele, nice that we got in two of her films this week.
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Old 11-01-08, 08:48 AM
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Dracula

For this year's viewing, I listening to the commentary track from film historian David J. Skal. It looks like he has written several books that would interest all of us. Has anyone read any of them?

Hollywood Gothic: The Tangled Web of Dracula from Novel to Stage to Screen
The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror
Dark Carnival: The Secret World of Tod Browning
V Is for Vampire: The A to Z Guide to Everything Undead
Screams of Reason: Mad Science and Modern Culture
Death Makes a Holiday: A Cultural History of Halloween
Claude Rains: An Actor's Voice (2008)


Now that I'm slightly movied out, I hope to read several books this month.

Last edited by Trevor; 11-01-08 at 08:54 AM. Reason: added Amazon link
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Old 11-01-08, 08:52 AM
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Frankenstein

Another commentary listen for me, as I have seen this film countless times. Film historian Rudy Behlmer does a good job, lots of information, but it seems scripted and has little if any scene-specific information.
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Old 11-01-08, 09:03 AM
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Horror of Dracula

Originally Posted by JOE29 View Post
Good job Trevor, that was great stuff. You really had me rollin'
Just a small thing to add. I noticed when Dracula and his victims were sleeping at the castle in the beginning of the movie, that their coffins had no lids. That kind of seemed odd to me as they could be affected by sunlight while they were sleeping.
Thanks Joe.

Was anyone else bothered by these "errors"? I'm usually not at all picky with films, but these gaffs really bothered me, partially ruining an otherwise great film.

But I'm still a big Hammer fan so far, and am slowly acquiring their DVDs. Was the TV series, Hammer's House of Horror I think, any good?
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Old 11-01-08, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
Thanks Joe.

Was anyone else bothered by these "errors"? I'm usually not at all picky with films, but these gaffs really bothered me, partially ruining an otherwise great film.

But I'm still a big Hammer fan so far, and am slowly acquiring their DVDs. Was the TV series, Hammer's House of Horror I think, any good?
I"m a Hammer fan, but to be honest, I was disappointed in most of the episodes in House of Horror. There's a couple of gems but the series just doesn't match up to the movies. On the other hand, it is a TV series and I got it dirt cheap so I'm happy to have it in the collection.
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Old 11-02-08, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
It looks like he has written several books that would interest all of us. Has anyone read any of them?
His Tod Browning bio is excellent, but I believe it is now out of print.
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Old 11-02-08, 01:02 PM
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The Innocents

One of the most beautifully shot films ever. Every frame looked like a painting. The boy, though, reminded me of Martin Prince from the Simpsons. He get's expelled from school and we never really find out why. I'm sure it's because he must have been beaten up every day. I wanted to beat him up after a few scenes.
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Old 11-03-08, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Pizza View Post
I"m a Hammer fan, but to be honest, I was disappointed in most of the episodes in House of Horror. There's a couple of gems but the series just doesn't match up to the movies. On the other hand, it is a TV series and I got it dirt cheap so I'm happy to have it in the collection.
Thanks. I see it a lot for $20, but will likely wait for a better price.
Originally Posted by NoirFan View Post
His Tod Browning bio is excellent, but I believe it is now out of print.
$22-81 on Amazon or Ebay right now. I'll keep an eye out for his books whenever I hit a used book store.
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Old 11-10-08, 07:03 AM
  #223  
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FYI, Chad has posted the 2008 results thread, and also a 2009 discussion thread.

I'm thinking that perhaps we'll go without this subset next year.
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Old 11-10-08, 04:24 PM
  #224  
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Originally Posted by Trevor View Post
I'm thinking that perhaps we'll go without this subset next year.
It was a good idea in theory, the problem was most of the people who chose films didn't bother to participate in the discussion of them.
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Old 11-13-08, 07:42 PM
  #225  
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Calling back to our conversation on The Exorcist spider walking scene, I saw this on Entertainment Earth and just started laughing out loud.

http://www.entertainmentearth.com/pr...711#LargeImage

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