Go Back  DVD Talk Forum > DVD Discussions > DVD Talk
Reload this Page >

The Ten Commandments 3 Disc Anniversary Edition 03.21.06

DVD Talk Talk about DVDs and Movies on DVD including Covers and Cases

The Ten Commandments 3 Disc Anniversary Edition 03.21.06

Old 03-22-06, 12:42 AM
  #51  
eau
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 9,379
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
How's the packaging like? Something like Ben Hurs SE?
Old 03-22-06, 11:41 AM
  #52  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1,482
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
So how many times has this been released, twice? It just seems like more.
Old 03-22-06, 12:01 PM
  #53  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: IL
Posts: 1,799
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dvd_luver
So how many times has this been released, twice? It just seems like more.
This is the 3rd release.
Old 03-22-06, 03:15 PM
  #54  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: on a river in a kayak..where else?
Posts: 4,949
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by flix1
This is the 3rd release.
Yup...and a triple-dipster I am. Again.
Old 03-22-06, 04:47 PM
  #55  
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 141
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by eau
How's the packaging like? Something like Ben Hurs SE?
Just got mine from Amazon and wait until you see the packaging. Absolutely gorgeous. The whole package looks like a stationery box except that it is all one piece. Instead of lifting the box cover off, it flips to the left, revealing the unfolding 3-disc digipak. The cover has an inset plastic that has a foil picture of Moses on it and foil lettering (CBD's The Ten Commandments). The other 4 pictures are on the actual Digipak, so when closed, you see all 5 pictures. The whole package is about 2/3 the thickness of Ben-Hur or GWTW. Easily the handsomest packaging I've ever seen and it will get immediate display status on my shelves.

Wifey's got the popcorn ready. We're going to watch the silent version tonight. Later.
Old 03-23-06, 10:29 AM
  #56  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
I just bought the new edition. I find the bitrate is the same as the first edition but the transfer is better and goes some way towards correcting a too-soft image in some scenes. I didn’t see any damage to the film. The matte and blue screen lines are still visible, as is to be expected. The colours are still incredibly brilliant to the point of being gaudy.


(From the 2nd edition transfer, presumably the same as the 3rd edition)

The commentary: As I only owned the first DVD edition before, I had never been exposed to Ms. Katherine Orrison’s commentary, which was probably a good thing. The woman is an expert on C.B. DeMille who wrote several books on the subject. Unfortunately, you wouldn’t know this from her comments which show that she is profoundly ignorant of things such as Bible studies, film techniques and the expectations of her public. But she is energetic and her historical knowledge of the two films cannot be faulted.

So how does the woman fill the projection time? She’s very good at describing what goes on on screen and gushing about things she likes (e.g.: “Will you just look at that lampshade!” or “That dress is a knock-out!”). She also recognizes actors and actresses that time forgot when they happen to have had a long relationship with DeMille. She unfortunately ignores the actors and actresses you would really like to know about in greater detail. I think she could have provided more revealing anecdotes like Anne Baxter’s scrumptious stories about the film in her autobiography “Intermission”.

The silent version: It has a 50 minute prologue which tells the story of the exodus up to the breaking of the tablets, followed by a 90 minute modern story about two brothers who differ in their respect for the ten commandments. Comparisons with the 1956 version are fascinating. As was the case with Ben-Hur, the silent version was as technically impressive for the time as the modern version was for its time. The picture quality is very good (for 1923) and the special effects still "work". The acting in the modern part is more natural than a lot of films of the period.

The extras: The second disc has a 37 minute documentary on the making of the 1956 version which is just long enough to be tantalizing and reveal more than Ms. Orrison’s nearly six hours of commentary time. It is also disappointing. E.g.: It would have been nice to see the works of art, by Gustave Doré, Maxfield Parrish, which, according to Katherine Orrison, inspired the film's visual style.

The extras also include 15 minutes of "hand-tinted" bits from the 1923 version, covering the exodus (which is in 2-strip Technicolor, with a predominance of red and green) to the parting of the Red Sea. Only the exodus scenes are in colour, the rest being simply sepia-tinted. A lot of it looks like black and white or else the tinting has definitely faded beyond all recognition in some places. Except for: the red tinting of the pillar of fire, which looks more like a wall of fire in this version, and which may have been manually "hand tinted" in, as the fire is red and the rest of the picture is brownish.

All in all, it’s a good package which could have been improved by having Ms. Orrison’s comments augmented by interviews with other actors and artists who really have something to say about both films' technical merits.

Last edited by baracine; 03-25-06 at 07:25 AM.
Old 03-23-06, 10:35 AM
  #57  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 1,411
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the review! It still sounds like if I don't really care about the silent film, there's zero reason to upgrade, aside from fancy packaging?
Old 03-23-06, 10:38 AM
  #58  
Moderator
 
Giles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 33,630
Received 17 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by flix1
This is the 3rd release.
and the inevitable HiDef fourth release
Old 03-23-06, 10:41 AM
  #59  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by ShagMan
Thanks for the review! It still sounds like if I don't really care about the silent film, there's zero reason to upgrade, aside from fancy packaging?
According to DVD Savant's review of the second edition, the transfer on that one was also an improvement on the first edition as far as correcting the too-soft image of the first edition, a common problem for VistaVision and Todd-AO transfers apparently. So if you own the second edition, stick to it, unless you're really curious about the silent version, which can only add to your appreciation of a film you already like. I'd still be curious to see a frame-by-frame screen capture comparison of the three transfers. DVD Beaver anyone?
Old 03-23-06, 10:53 AM
  #60  
Moderator
 
Giles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 33,630
Received 17 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by baracine
According to DVD Savant's review of the second edition, the transfer on that one was also an improvement on the first edition as far as correcting the too-soft image of the first edition, a common problem for VistaVision and Todd-AO transfers apparently.
is that why Fox botched the film to video transfer of Oklahoma! (ack, my eyes!)

technically how is this a problem - I would have thought that a 65mm transfers wouldn't be a problem like Warner's Around the World in 80 Days
Old 03-23-06, 11:03 AM
  #61  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Giles
is that why Fox botched the film to video transfer of Oklahoma! (ack, my eyes!)

technically how is this a problem - I would have thought that a 65mm transfers wouldn't be a problem like Warner's Around the World in 80 Days
Yes, the Todd-AO Oklahoma transfer was, inexplicably, not as good as the transfer of the CinemaScope version in the same package. That is a mystery to me. Maybe the added information would cause the picture to be too detailed and therefore show that old laserdisc bugaboo, aliasing. Or maybe the DVD authors just skipped on the bitrate because they wanted to cut costs. Another element of the puzzle is that the Oklahoma Todd-AO elements are 30 frames per second, which would theoretically mesh wonderfully with the 30 frames per second of the NTSC process. But, maybe then again that was a hindrance as the 30 frames of NTSC are more of the order of 29.98 frames per second. The subject is fascinating to me but is still a profound mystery. If I had to relive my life I would dedicate it to make decent DVD transfers!

By way of comparison, the latest edition of Hitchcock's Vertigo is from VistaVision elements (or maybe a VistaVision to 70 mm transfer) and it ain't bad and a marked improvement over the preceding edition, which after all the kerfuffle involved in restoring the film, was a non-anamorphic letterbox transfer.

Also mysteriously, there was never any problem in making a decent 24 frame per second Todd-AO transfer of The Sound Of Music on DVD.

Last edited by baracine; 03-23-06 at 11:12 AM.
Old 03-23-06, 11:30 AM
  #62  
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Lower Appalachia
Posts: 2,909
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by baracine
Also mysteriously, there was never any problem in making a decent 24 frame per second Todd-AO transfer of The Sound Of Music on DVD.
Todd-AO dropped 30fps after Around the World in 80 Days. The Sound of Music and all subsequent Todd-AO filmes were 24fps.
Old 03-23-06, 11:36 AM
  #63  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by obscurelabel
Todd-AO dropped 30fps after Around the World in 80 Days. The Sound of Music and all subsequent Todd-AO filmes were 24fps.
... which is why I mentioned, and I quote:

Also mysteriously, there was never any problem in making a decent 24 frame per second Todd-AO transfer of The Sound Of Music on DVD.
Old 03-23-06, 12:17 PM
  #64  
Moderator
 
Giles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 33,630
Received 17 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by obscurelabel
Todd-AO dropped 30fps after Around the World in 80 Days. The Sound of Music and all subsequent Todd-AO filmes were 24fps.
so Hello, Dolly! Todd-AO was 24fps then (?).

Will 65mm be less problematic for conversion to HiDef DVD?

Fox needs to step up to the plate and deliver stellar film to video transfers like Warner Bros. does.
Old 03-23-06, 12:42 PM
  #65  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Giles
so Hello, Dolly! Todd-AO was 24fps then (?).
Yes. (But Ms. Streisand's hips swing so smoothly in that big dance number with the restaurant waiters - like butter! - you'd swear it was 30 frames per second.)

Will 65mm be less problematic for conversion to HiDef DVD?
Theoretically, the more information (resolution) you have on the original film elements, the easier it would be to make a high-definition transfer. But as the Oklahoma Todd-AO to DVD transfer shows, something can always go wrong with the original film elements or the DVD authoring team overdosing on too much marijuana in the lab and pushing the wrong, large, shiny buttons.

Last edited by baracine; 03-23-06 at 02:27 PM.
Old 03-23-06, 12:56 PM
  #66  
Moderator
 
Giles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 33,630
Received 17 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by baracine
Yes. (But Ms. Streisand's hips swing so smoothly in that big dance number with the restaurant waiters - like butter! - you'd swear it was 30 frames per second.)
the 70mm presentation I recently saw was A-M-A-Z-I-N-G. Bright, colourful, almost three dimensional (notably during the march, and restaurant, sequence)
Old 03-23-06, 02:31 PM
  #67  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Giles
- almost three dimensional -
I got that impression from the recent DVD transfer of Ryan's Daughter (from a 70 mm element).
Old 03-23-06, 04:30 PM
  #68  
Dai
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 286
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Bah....I saw this release yesterday and the Canadian version has everything bilingual...and it's all in foil lettering too!!!!

I was going to get it, but now I'll have to look for a US version..

They should have just stuck the bilingual sheet at the back like they do with other releases.
Old 03-23-06, 04:43 PM
  #69  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Dai
Bah....I saw this release yesterday and the Canadian version has everything bilingual...and it's all in foil lettering too!!!!

I was going to get it, but now I'll have to look for a US version..

They should have just stuck the bilingual sheet at the back like they do with other releases.
We have another English-Canadian sophisticate here who thinks a few words of French will kill him... Hmm...



In other news, both Katherine Orrison and the IMDb state that the silent Ten Commandements (1923)' colour scenes were done in 2-strip Technicolor. I suppose these film elements have disappeared if the extras in this package only show "hand-painted" film elements, and very faded at that.

The packaging talks about "hand-tinted" footage (and not "hand-painted" as I've said) and after re-watching this footage in the silent film's extras, I am now convinced that the exodus scenes (just a few minutes) are actually 2-strip Technicolor, as the colours don't bleed at all and there is a predominance of red and greens typical of that process. The rest is just tinted sepia brownish, which makes the red sea look like reddish-brown Jello. I wouldn't boast about the fact that it's hand tinted, though. How labour-intensive can it be to dip a strip of film in some colour bath?

Last edited by baracine; 03-23-06 at 05:22 PM.
Old 03-23-06, 09:52 PM
  #70  
Cool New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 22
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hand tinted usually meant painstaking, frame by frame application of color.
Old 03-24-06, 07:12 AM
  #71  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by Nicegreen
Hand tinted usually meant painstaking, frame by frame application of color.
This is another thing we can blame this package for: the lack of details on the extras. As I've said, the "hand tinted" scenes are in reality about two minutes of 2-strip Technicolor (processed by the Technicolor lab, see "Technical Specs" in the IMDb "Ten Commandments" 1923 entry - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0014532/technical ) showing the Hebrews in the desert during the Exodus and very short, isolated scenes of Pharaoh's chariots, plus about 13 minutes of sepia-brown scenes from the exodus to the parting of the Red Sea. Except for: the red tinting of the pillar of fire, which looks more like a wall of fire in this version, and which I grant you may have been "hand tinted" in, as the fire is red and the rest of the picture is brownish.

Any way you look at it, it is misleading to call "hand tinted", scenes that comprise three different processes, at least two of which are mechanical: (1) 2-strip Technicolor, (2) sepia tinting and (3) presumably "painstaking" frame-by-frame hand painting of the pillar of fire (less than one minute of screen time in all). For this reason, this extra feature should have been offered with an optional technical commentary.

It is also possible that all three processes could have been realized and duplicated by the Technicolor labs, which would have been responsible for the processing of those (approximately) two complete reels of film for inclusion in the rest of the finished film. This site also mentions the involvement of the Technicolor labs: http://www.silentera.com/PSFL/data/T...ments1923.html . Other sites command the film for its "pioneering use of Technicolor". I can imagine the effect on the viewing public in 1923 must have been magical and surprising and that DeMille kept his methods just as secret as the special effects behind the parting of the Red Sea.

P.S.: Every time I go back and look at this package, I keep modifying my previous review which is pretty definitive by now, except for the fact that, on reflexion, I would grant that Ms. Orrison's commentary is not as bad as I said. After all, without her, I wouldn't have been reminded that the two-strip Technicolor process was used for the silent version (althouth she mentions this during her 1956 version commentary). So she at least knows more on the subject than the people who put this package together. I am reminded here of the packaging of "The Robe" DVD (Fox) which proudly displays a still of Victor Mature from "The Egyptian" (also Fox) in full Egyptian general regalia on its back cover.

Note the use of red flames in the following 1923 poster:

Last edited by baracine; 03-24-06 at 05:02 PM.
Old 03-24-06, 01:34 PM
  #72  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: on a river in a kayak..where else?
Posts: 4,949
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by baracine
I got that impression from the recent DVD transfer of Ryan's Daughter (from a 70 mm element).
Now thats a great dvd!
Old 03-25-06, 06:02 AM
  #73  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto
Posts: 3,039
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by gutwrencher
Now thats a great dvd!
DVD Beaver states about the Ryan's Daughter DVD ( http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDRev...dvd_review.htm ):

It's early in the year but I definitely think this is the best transfer I have seen so far in 2006. It is advertised as from a 'New digital transfer of restored 65mm picture and audio elements' which may be accurate but hardly seems to give it full justice. Sharpness and detail are crystal clear, the image has wonderful depth and colors seem to jump off the screen. I suspect that it is one of the best DVD image transfer I have ever seen. The largely untested 5.1 soundtrack is likewise excellent. To further expand this theatrical presentation the overture, intermission, entre'acte and exit music are thankfully included. The commentary and extras offer some wonderfully illuminating moments in the creation of the film and director Lean himself.

The film is far from Lean's best work, in my opinion, but it has his 'epic' production fingerprints molding the powerful visuals and romantic vision. This is a David Lean film and Warner have risen to the occasion and given us a miraculous digital keepsake.

Gary W. Tooze
Excellent... Powerful... Miraculous... It sounds like a transfer Moses brought down with him from Mount Sinaï. But it really is all that!


(Look in Trevor Howard's eyes. Close one eye and watch the picture come alive in 3-D!)

Last edited by baracine; 03-25-06 at 07:16 AM.
Old 03-25-06, 09:18 AM
  #74  
Cool New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: South of Boston
Posts: 40
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Best deal: $10

For you members of Columbia House's DV2 club, you can get this DVD for just $10!

If you're not a member, you can join for $9.95 and get two free DVDs for joining. Here's the link, in case you're interested:

http://www.columbiahouse.com/sa/ch/homepage_ch_com.jsp

I've been a member since the start of it and have been able to get some good deals.
Old 03-25-06, 10:08 AM
  #75  
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: on a river in a kayak..where else?
Posts: 4,949
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Originally Posted by baracine



Excellent... Powerful... Miraculous... It sounds like a transfer Moses brought down with him from Mount Sinaï. But it really is all that!
Agreed. And like was said, it may be early in 2006, but this is by far my fave release of the year so far, quality and presentation wise.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.