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How do we check if a disc is anamorphic in transfer?

How do we check if a disc is anamorphic in transfer?

 
Old 12-08-03, 07:09 AM
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How do we check if a disc is anamorphic in transfer?

I've been able to use the nero infotool to check certain dvd infomation. It stated NTSC 16:9 (MPEG 2, 720 x 480) while cyberlink powerdvd configuration shows the following data.

Video Attributes:
Video compression mode: MPEG-2
TV system: 525/60 (NTSC)
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Display Mode: Only Letterbox
Source picture resolution: 720x480 (525/60)
Frame Rate: 30.00
Source picture letterboxed: Not letterboxed
Bitrate: 8.16Mbps

I wasn't too sure if the aspect ratio is stated as 16:9 or the "Source picture letterboxed: Not letterboxed" is stated, means the dvd is genuinely anamorphic. is there other software programs that can test and check if a disc is anamorphic?
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Old 12-08-03, 07:14 AM
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InterVideo WinDVD.

You put the disc in, the screen gets wider. If it's not anamorphic, the screen stays 4:3.
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Old 12-08-03, 07:25 AM
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perhaps i'm confused over the concept of anamorphic transfer....

but from what i understand is that the source aspect ratio is already widescreen and all the available space in the disc is put into that widescreen aspect ratio and thus higher quality. when this anamorphic transfer is being played on the computer, the 2 horizontal black bar comes from the dvd playing software and not from the disc.

some discs however will add the 2 horizontal black bar above and below the video clip, such that even though it look like a widescreen transfer, the source aspect ratio is actually full screen, which means that the 2 black bar came from the dvd.

am i rite about the above description? sorry if i sound like a really confused (and perhaps i really is) dude.
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Old 12-08-03, 07:35 AM
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yes u R rite

However, an anamorphic transfer does not guarantee quality. That depends on the source quality and the video bitrate.

well cum to the forum
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Old 12-08-03, 07:44 AM
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sometimes i can tell if it is really anamorphic or pseudoanamorphic when the black bar from the dvd is actually of a more greyish tone as compared to the black background of the video screen. but at other times, it is hard to tell.

i do agree on the part on the source quality but i thought the bitrate actually fluctuates along with time, so it is hard to use it as a comparing parameter.
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Old 12-08-03, 07:56 AM
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Yes, the bitrate varies. However, you can set a maximum, which may (or may not) affect the the average. By lowering the max, you can get more on a disc.
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Old 12-08-03, 10:44 AM
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you can check http://www.dvdcompare.org.uk/comparisons
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Old 12-08-03, 10:46 AM
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wow u guyz r smart.
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Old 12-08-03, 10:56 AM
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Letterbox just means widescreen. Nothing to do with anamorphic.
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Old 12-08-03, 01:31 PM
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Old 12-08-03, 04:41 PM
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This may be wrong, but my understanding of your question is that you want to know when a transfer is anamorphic widescreen versus just (letterbox) widescreen. Usually, the disc will say "Enahnced for Widescreen TVs" (these are Warner discs), or "Anamorphic" will appear near the aspect ratio (Universal discs). There's usually some indication in the packaging on the back.

As far as what happens on your TV, my understanding is just this: when you have a DVD playing on a widescreen (16:9) TV, an anamorphic disc will automatically expand to fill the screen completely if it is a 1:85:1 aspect ratio, and it will do the same, leaving some black bars if it is the even wider, 2:35:1 aspect ratio. On a Sony TV, this will occur on the "Full" wide mode. On a "normal" (read: 4:3 traditional) viewing mode, the image will fill the screen but will appear compressed on the sides. People will look thinner and stretched vertically. That makes sense if you think about it because they'll stretch out horizontally to hte right size once you switch from the "normal" to the "full" viewing mode.

A non-anamorphic disc will not do this and will appear in letterboxed format (black bars) on the "normal" and will look stretched horizontally (everyone looks wide and fatter) on the "full" mode. On a widescreen TV, these are best viewed either on Wide Zoom which only stretches the sides a bit and cuts very little off the top and bottom, or on "normal" as per a traditional TV set.

Hope this helps.
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Old 12-09-03, 12:43 PM
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I don't believe there is any surefire way to know if a disc is anamorphic. A lot of discs will indicate some variation of the "enhanced for widescreen TVs" or "16:9 enhanced" or "anamorphic widescreen". A lot, however, will not say anything even though they are anamorphic. Furthermore, some will lie and say it's anamorphic when it's not.

If I'm not sure if a movie is anamorphic (such as a rental from NetFlix), I'll start in FULL mode on my Toshiba. If the movie is widescreen, but there are no black bars visible, then it's anamorphic. If there are relatively small black bars, the movie is probably either 2.35:1 or non-anamorphic 1.85:1. I then have to just look at the picture and decide if the dimensions look correct. If the picture looks squashed, I'll switch to TheaterWide 2, which is a straight zoom. At this point, there will be no black bars visible and the picture should look correct. This is how 1.85:1 non-anamorphic works.

If the black bars in FULL mode are huge, then it's probably a 2.35:1 non-anamorphic disc. Once again, I switch to the zoom mode and get the normal small bars common to 2.35:1 movies.
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Old 12-09-03, 12:55 PM
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http://gregl.net/videophile/anamorphic.htm
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Old 12-09-03, 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by Brian McHale
I don't believe there is any surefire way to know if a disc is anamorphic.
Popping a disc into a DVD-ROM is the easiest way -- if your software is configured the way mine is, if it's in anamorphic widescreen, the DVD window is large and rectangular. If it's not, then...well, it's not.

I have a Sony VVega that supports the 16x9 squeeze but doesn't 'read' the flags on DVDs, so I have to do it manually. It's really easy to tell on that set if DVDs are in anamorphic widescreen or not.
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