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Matrix:Reloaded "enhancd for widescreen"?

Matrix:Reloaded "enhancd for widescreen"?

 
Old 10-21-03, 06:15 PM
  #26  
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Sh*t - they should have made adjustable HDTVs. They could have neat little servos and gizmos that shrink or expand the screen to perfectly fit any video source.

Then we won't have anymore "Black Bar" questions.
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Old 10-21-03, 06:51 PM
  #27  
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Originally posted by arthur_dent
Are you saying you won't buy any movies in 2:35.1 because of you're TV? Shame, most movies are in that format.
Now way. I would much rather prefer a DVD that was stretched to fit my new widescreen HDTV, after all it's why I bough the television in the first place. Even when I had a 4:3 television I would always choose the widescreen format, and at that time I knew having bars onscreen was an inevitability. However with the widespread of widescreen televisions, one would think studios would do as much as possible to optimize their films to fully take advantage of these screens.

As I see it now, us widescreen owners are getting the short end of the stick. We have to watch deformed broadcast display, and DVDs that for the most part look the way they do (in terms of display) on a 4:3 screen.

At least all my Xbox games display at 16:9....
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Old 10-21-03, 08:35 PM
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I've updated my post...you might want to check out the link. I own a Widescreen TV, too, but I would never ever only buy 1.85:1 movies so that it fit my tv. That's almost as stupid as foolscreen movies. Widescreen TVs are at a ratio that took advantage of being in the middle of all common ratios. Black bars are inevitable in widescreen TVs too because the 2.35:1 movies are too wide to fit the entire screen without using the "fullscreen effect" and losing some of the picture. The recruit is a DVD that changed it's 2.35:1 W I D E S C R E E N ratio to a 16:9 cut to fit Widescreen TVs. For the TV shows, you can wait until your cable company finally changes to HDTV (which is what I'm doing. Cox should have it before December here) and the widescreen TV is used for its excellent purpose. If you don't want to wait, you should buy a high definition antenna. That's even more complicated, but to save you the search, if you have an HDTV capable or HDTV monitor, you need to buy an extra set top box to decode the information in order to view it. If your tv is a HDTV ready, then you should be all set, just plug it in and get HDTV delivered to your TV without other boxes. You might want to search here or google for more. I hope I helped. Don't forget to go to http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...hic/index.html and http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...reenorama.html

Last edited by arthur_dent; 10-21-03 at 08:51 PM.
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Old 10-21-03, 08:59 PM
  #29  
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Originally posted by mee2
I would much rather prefer a DVD that was stretched to fit my new widescreen HDTV, after all it's why I bough the television in the first place.
So basically you want them to pan and scan or crop a 2.35:1 film to an aspect ratio of 1.85:1 so it fits your HDTV? Or do you want them to zoom in on it so it has less resolution to fit the screen?

Originally posted by mee2
However with the widespread of widescreen televisions, one would think studios would do as much as possible to optimize their films to fully take advantage of these screens. [/B]
Why on Earth do you think someone should sacrifice their artistic vision for a film to please HDTV owners. In that vein I think all artists should paint in black and white because I am color blind.


Originally posted by mee2
As I see it now, us widescreen owners are getting the short end of the stick. We have to watch deformed broadcast display, and DVDs that for the most part look the way they do (in terms of display) on a 4:3 screen. [/B]
Can you clarify this because it makes no sense to me.
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Old 10-21-03, 10:39 PM
  #30  
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Originally posted by mee2
Oh well, it looks like it's not "true" anamorphic, or at least the picture isn't stretched to the point of filling up the screen. I just watchd my Aliens DVD, and no black bars in sight.
Why advertize a DVD as being "enhanced for widescreen televisions" when we're(16:9 owners) basically getting the same tratment as those with 4:3 televisions?
This person must be pulling our leg...right?...right?

Yikes.
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Old 10-21-03, 11:04 PM
  #31  
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Ok, this is a little elitist sounding, but it's a good rule of thumb for keeping things like this in perspective. I have no idea who said it, someone use to have it in their sig on the newsgroups.

"Theater is life. Cinema is art. Television is furniture."

And just to be sure, please see the sig.

peace
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Old 10-21-03, 11:18 PM
  #32  
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Was the FAQ stolen from this site or something? ^%$#^&%R*( newbies!!!
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Old 10-22-03, 02:42 AM
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Originally posted by mee2
Now way. I would much rather prefer a DVD that was stretched to fit my new widescreen HDTV, after all it's why I bough the television in the first place. Even when I had a 4:3 television I would always choose the widescreen format, and at that time I knew having bars onscreen was an inevitability. However with the widespread of widescreen televisions, one would think studios would do as much as possible to optimize their films to fully take advantage of these screens.

As I see it now, us widescreen owners are getting the short end of the stick. We have to watch deformed broadcast display, and DVDs that for the most part look the way they do (in terms of display) on a 4:3 screen.
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Old 10-22-03, 03:58 PM
  #34  
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Originally posted by masetodd
Sh*t - they should have made adjustable HDTVs. They could have neat little servos and gizmos that shrink or expand the screen to perfectly fit any video source.

Then we won't have anymore "Black Bar" questions.
But of course we do.

Stewart

How much money ya got?
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