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-   -   DTS (https://forum.dvdtalk.com/dvd-home-theater-gear/58342-dts.html)

koobird 09-05-00 09:02 PM

I heard somewhere on this forum that the DTS decoder MUST be present in the receiver for one to listen to DTS. Is this true?

I have a receiver that is DD ready; so I am thinking about buying a DD/ DTS DVD player. Wont that be enough?

dodobird 09-05-00 09:27 PM

Short answer: No.

Long answer: Unless your DVD player can decode DTS (in which case you'd have little use for the receiver), you won't hear DTS sound because your receiver can't decode the signal.
I'm talking about those more expensive players that have the decoder built-in, where you connect the speakers directly to it.

Frankly, an receiver would be a better choice, because... you know why. Sound quality, amplification, etc. Like having a separate monitor is better than having an iMac, get it? http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/smile.gif

Having said that, check if your receiver can decode DTS, if not... you got the two choices:
. DVD player that decodes DD/DTS
-or_
. DVD player that passes the sound signal + a receiver that does DD/DTS decoding.

I don't know the specific name (if there is such a thing) for a DVD player that does decoding. "DD/DTS ready" could mean it does decoding or it passes DD/DTS signals. Anyone?

koobird 09-05-00 09:39 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by dodobird:
Frankly, an receiver would be a better choice, because... you know why. Sound quality, amplification, etc. Like having a separate monitor is better than having an iMac, get it? http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/smile.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ok. So there is a considerable difference in quality of sound in a DTS receiver vs. a DTS DVD player? Like I said, my current receiver is DD READY, meaning it only passes the DD signal and has no decoder. So I am better off buying a whole new DD/ DTS receiver?


electronix_kid 09-05-00 11:04 PM

If i were you, and had a DD READY reciever but no DTS, i would get a new reciever, if oyu want DTS... iof you want only DD, get a DVD with a built in Decoder, although i strongly advise anybody without either DVD/reciever to get a decoder in the reciever instead of DVD

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cloud 09-06-00 12:04 AM

I think there is some confusion going on here. In order to play back a DTS soundtrack you need to have both a DVD player that passes a DTS signal and a receiver that accepts and decodes that DTS signal. If one or both of these components does not have DTS capability then you risk ruining the component(s). Make sure the DTS logo is present on both the DVD player and the receiver. http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/smile.gif http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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BEC 09-06-00 01:13 AM

I think the Panasonic 320 and Pioneer 626 are the among the very few (possibly only) DVD players w/built-in DTS decoders. Those players would give you DTS w/a receiver that had 5.1 inputs (ie DD ready). Most other players will only "pass the DTS bitstream" in raw, undecoded form.

Otherwise, as has been pointed out, you'll need a DTS decoding receiver (Sherwood and Kenwood make models for less than $250) or a separate processor (a used Technics SHAC500D or Millenium runs for under $200). If your current receiver has a quality amp, a processor isn't a bad idea - just hook it up to the 5.1 inputs of your receiver.

Of course you have to make sure your player
is at least DTS compatible.

You can help things out by listing the model/brand of your DVD player and receiver.


koobird 09-06-00 05:29 PM

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by cloud:
I think there is some confusion going on here. In order to play back a DTS soundtrack you need to have both a DVD player that passes a DTS signal and a receiver that accepts and decodes that DTS signal. If one or both of these components does not have DTS capability then you risk ruining the component(s). Make sure the DTS logo is present on both the DVD player and the receiver. http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/smile.gif http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/biggrin.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ok. You guys are giving me conflicting advice. Who's right?

Cloud says that the DTS logo must be present on both the player and the receiver. on the other hand, BEC says that you can enjoy DTS by having a DTS decoder in your DVD player and a DD-READY receiver without the DTS logo.


DNMonty 09-06-00 05:49 PM

Run, do not walk. Go and get an Onkyo 575X and never look back. DD & DTS are amazing!!! But seriously, if you already have adequate amplification and enough inputs, just get a decent DVD player with a built in decoder. The only problem I can foresee is that the signal is going to be digital from DVD to decoder and then on to RCA cables to go to the amplifiers. If you were dealing with a DD/DTS receiver, then it would be digital into the receiver via optical or coax input. The signal would pass over nothing but internal curcuit paths until it goes to the output transformers on the receiver.

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Pioneer DV-525
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Idisappear 09-06-00 07:11 PM

save yourself from headache, buy a receiver with dd/dts decoding capability, it's a common thing nowadays. any dvd player with digital out via toslink or digital coax should be able to deliver those raw dd/dts signal. any thing you buy, make sure it is not just DD/or DTS "READY" as sometimes they put on the logo to somewhat deceive unsuspecting consumers.

daledude 09-06-00 09:19 PM

You can just buy a dvd player with built in decoder to listen to DTS/DD. I know Panasonic use to make a model that did this, and I think the new Toshiba 5 disk player (4205?) decodes both formats as well.

You could also decode both formats with a Technics AC-500 processor as well.


Unless you have an expensive receiver or your dvd player is a first generation model it may make more sense to buy a new reciever. You can easily buy a receiver that decodes both formats for less money then buying either a dvd player or decoder.

As for the above confusion.

The dvd player must be able to read the DTS signal from the DVD. Some early model dvd players can only read the DTS signal from CD's. You must make sure that your dvd player can read DTS DVD's.

Next, the signal must pass to a decoder for the DTS signal. This can be found in a few dvd players which have built in decoders (most dvd players do not have built in decoders).

Once the signal passes thru the processor, it must then go thru an amp (in your case your receiver).

cloud 09-06-00 11:29 PM

There are two ways to get DTS sound.

1)If you're DVD player has a built in DD/DTS decoder then the sound will be decoded in the DVD player and passed on to the reciever whcich can be a DD only reciever as opposed to DD/DTS.

2)If you're DVD player is DTS capable (in other words it is able to pass the raw DTS signal) and you're reciever is DTS capable (in other words it can decode/process the DTS signal and pass it on to you're speakers), this will also work.

The second option might be better in the long term as the DD/DTS capability can be used for other input sources. Plus having the processing capability in your reciever will give you better results then having it in you're DVD player. Therefore if you are in situation 1 that's fine, but situation 2 is usually preferable. However it does mean buying a new reciever that is capable of processing the DD/DTS signal. I hope this has helped and not confused you even more. http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/smile.gif http://talk.dvdtalk.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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koobird 09-07-00 12:34 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by cloud:
There are two ways to get DTS sound.

1)If you're DVD player has a built in DD/DTS decoder then the sound will be decoded in the DVD player and passed on to the reciever whcich can be a DD only reciever as opposed to DD/DTS.

2)If you're DVD player is DTS capable (in other words it is able to pass the raw DTS signal) and you're reciever is DTS capable (in other words it can decode/process the DTS signal and pass it on to you're speakers), this will also work.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you for clearing that up.

[This message has been edited by koobird (edited September 07, 2000).]

BEC 09-07-00 09:24 PM

I WAS NOT ambiguous:

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>... the Panasonic 320 and Pioneer 626 are the among the very few (possibly only) DVD players w/built-in DTS decoders. Those players would give you DTS w/a receiver that had 5.1 inputs (ie DD ready).

Otherwise, as has been pointed out, you'll need a DTS decoding receiver (Sherwood and Kenwood make models for less than $250) or a separate processor (a used Technics SHAC500D or Millenium runs for under $200).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you read your owner's manuals, you could cleared up most of your own confusion.

Since you decided to let other people figure things out for you, you would have helped everyone ENORMOUSLY if you just listed the brand and model of your equipment. Perhaps a rough budget? Some idea of what you wanted to keep?

Hmmmm... sounds like you were the one who wrote ambiguously.




[This message has been edited by BEC (edited September 07, 2000).]


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