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Some questions about 720p / 1080i

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Some questions about 720p / 1080i

Old 02-17-08, 02:24 PM
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Some questions about 720p / 1080i

I just set up my brothers upconverting DVD player and have a quick question. His TVs max res is 1080i and I noticed that the upconverting player looks better set to 720p than it does set to 1080i. Same thing with his cable box. Is that normal?
Also, why is there no 720i ??
Old 02-17-08, 05:08 PM
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I can't answer your last question, but really you should set your output to whatever looks best to you. Your display is going to output it's native resolution. Some will argue for the "best" picture you should match your source to your displays native resolution as all things being equal it should give you the best pic. However imo things are never equal, so you should not worry about it and set your sources to what looks best to your eyes on your display.

BTW...some argue that 720p produces a better image then 1080i. That the best image resolutions go in this order; 1080p, 720p 1080i. Some argue it goes 1080p, 1080i, 720p.

But remember your display is going to output the native resolution it has. So if the TV is 1080i it is going to convert all incoming signals to 1080i.
Old 02-17-08, 05:24 PM
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The reason there's no 720i is because progressive is better.

When the ATSC designed the HDTV standard for the US, the maximum resolution TV manufacturers could handle at the time is 1080i at 60 fields/sec. However, they wanted a progressive resolution as well, so they halved the resolution to 720, which at 60 progressive frames/sec is the same total number of pixels/sec as 1080i. The two resolutions having the same number of total pixels/sec was also a bandwidth consideration for broadcast. There was no reason to create a 720i resolution, since that was less pixels/sec than any HDTV can handle, and nothing up to that point had used that resolution yet.

BTW, shouldn't this be in HD Talk?
Old 02-21-08, 03:23 AM
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720p>1080i
Old 02-24-08, 03:34 AM
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It sounds like the TV is converting 1080i to 540p and scaling that, rather than properly deinterlacing the content. What is the set's native resolution? You said it was 1080i, but that may just mean it can accept up to 1080i.
Old 02-24-08, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Drexl
It sounds like the TV is converting 1080i to 540p and scaling that, rather than properly deinterlacing the content. What is the set's native resolution? You said it was 1080i, but that may just mean it can accept up to 1080i.
it's 1080i
Old 02-24-08, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by JZ1276
it's 1080i
So it's a CRT TV?

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