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having a hard time with the Hz-kHz conversion...

Old 01-03-06, 04:10 PM
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having a hard time with the Hz-kHz conversion...

ok, before I start, I'll say that math was never a strong subject for me. So please talk to me like I'm a dumbass.

and I know that 1 hertz = 0.001 kilohertz. Now...

I just bought a pair of Pioneer S-HF21-LR bookshelf speakers and the specs say that the frequency response is 55~20 kHz.

The current speakers I have from my Kenwood HTIB have 100 Hz~20,000 Hz.

Now, if I'm doing this right, to get the specs for my current speakers (the kenwoods) in kHz I'd have to multiply each number by .001. So 20,000 Hz would be 20 kHz. BUT, if I multiply 100 by .001, I get 0.1 ...which to me desn't make much sense specs wise because my new Pioneers are written as 55~20 kHz. So the Kenwoods would be written as .1~20 Khz if it were in kHz.
I know I've also seen times when I see the specs written as 100Hz~20kHz (which makes sense), so part of me thinks the Kenwood spec sheet has a typo. But there are specs for all the speakers in my HTIB written on the same page in different charts (so if it is a typo, it's repeated a few times).

Hope you are following so far. And I hope I'm making sense.

Now looking on Axioms site, the surrounds I want (QS8's) are listed as:
Freq Resp +/-3db (Hz): 95 - 22 kHz
Freq Resp +3dB- 9dB (Hz): 65 - 22 kHz


So if I'm correct, the feq. range on the Axioms are better than the Pioneers 55~20 Khz range, but what about the Kenwoods 100 Hz~ 20,000 Hz? I can't imagine that cheap HTIB speaker would have the same frequency range as high quality speakers, but the Pioneers which are about $30 retail each would be less than the Kenwoods (even the Pioneers that are around $100 each have seemingly smaller freq. range than the Kenwoods: see next paragraph).

Another thing that confuses me GREATLY is that I also see on the spec sheet for the Pioneer speakers that list 4 different models (each better than the first) that the freq. range SHRINKS as you go down the list. i.e. the cheapest speaker's range is 55~20 kHz, while the best is 40~20 kHz. I would think that the better (more expensive) the speaker is, the wider the frequency range would be (at least that's what I see on Axiom's site and other places). Someone help me with THAT.

Basically I'd like to know how EXACTLY to convert Hz to kHz and which speakers have the best range. And what's the deal with the shrinking freq. range on the Pioneer spec sheet.

Please help.... my brain is gonna explode
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Old 01-03-06, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by AsmodeusVice
ok, before I start, I'll say that math was never a strong subject for me. So please talk to me like I'm a dumbass.

and I know that 1 hertz = 0.001 kilohertz. Now...

I just bought a pair of Pioneer S-HF21-LR bookshelf speakers and the specs say that the frequency response is 55~20 kHz.

The current speakers I have from my Kenwood HTIB have 100 Hz~20,000 Hz.

Now, if I'm doing this right, to get the specs for my current speakers (the kenwoods) in kHz I'd have to multiply each number by .001. So 20,000 Hz would be 20 kHz. BUT, if I multiply 100 by .001, I get 0.1 ...which to me desn't make much sense specs wise because my new Pioneers are written as 55~20 kHz. So the Kenwoods would be written as .1~20 Khz if it were in kHz.
I know I've also seen times when I see the specs written as 100Hz~20kHz (which makes sense), so part of me thinks the Kenwood spec sheet has a typo. But there are specs for all the speakers in my HTIB written on the same page in different charts (so if it is a typo, it's repeated a few times).

Hope you are following so far. And I hope I'm making sense.

Now looking on Axioms site, the surrounds I want (QS8's) are listed as:
Freq Resp +/-3db (Hz): 95 - 22 kHz
Freq Resp +3dB- 9dB (Hz): 65 - 22 kHz


So if I'm correct, the feq. range on the Axioms are better than the Pioneers 55~20 Khz range, but what about the Kenwoods 100 Hz~ 20,000 Hz? I can't imagine that cheap HTIB speaker would have the same frequency range as high quality speakers, but the Pioneers which are about $30 retail each would be less than the Kenwoods (even the Pioneers that are around $100 each have seemingly smaller freq. range than the Kenwoods: see next paragraph).

Another thing that confuses me GREATLY is that I also see on the spec sheet for the Pioneer speakers that list 4 different models (each better than the first) that the freq. range SHRINKS as you go down the list. i.e. the cheapest speaker's range is 55~20 kHz, while the best is 40~20 kHz. I would think that the better (more expensive) the speaker is, the wider the frequency range would be (at least that's what I see on Axiom's site and other places). Someone help me with THAT.

Basically I'd like to know how EXACTLY to convert Hz to kHz and which speakers have the best range. And what's the deal with the shrinking freq. range on the Pioneer spec sheet.

Please help.... my brain is gonna explode
You shouldn't need to convert to get an idea of the freq range of a speaker. The first number will always be hz and the second khz. Almost all consumer-grade speakers have a range of XXX hz to 20khz. I'm not sure what you mean by saying that the freq. range "shrinks" as you go down the list. You said the the cheaper speaker has a range of 55hz-20khz and the expensive one has a range of 40hz-20khz. 40-20 is a greater range than 55-20, so the range is increasing, not decreasing.

I'm going to be the elitist bastard everyone here knows I am and tell you that these specs don't mean much with respect to speakers made by Kenwood and Pioneer. Both companies make, at best, entry-level HTiB quality speakers.

Axiom is a better company and, although I have not heard them myself, fairly well regarded for its speakers. Stay away from the other two brands if you can.

The important number ina freq. range is the first number (hz) - i.e. how low can the speaker play. None of the speakers you mention are going to produce much bass. Even many so-called "full range" speakers need a sub, or at least lots of power to reach the bottom end of their freq. range.

I hope this helps!
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Old 01-04-06, 01:20 PM
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Thanks for the help Bob. It does clarify things much better. The only thing I can't wrap my head around is how 40-20 is a greater range than 55-20. To me it seems that the range is shrinking instead of expanding.

I thought that the higher the first number and the lower the second is (usually down to 20) the better.
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Old 01-04-06, 01:39 PM
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That's 40Hz thru 20000Hz, and 55Hz thru 20000Hz. 40 thru 20000 is a bigger range, including 15 more frequencies from 40 thru 54.

They will often print it as "40-20K" to make it "simpler". Obviously, that isn't really the case.
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Old 01-04-06, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by AsmodeusVice
Thanks for the help Bob. It does clarify things much better. The only thing I can't wrap my head around is how 40-20 is a greater range than 55-20. To me it seems that the range is shrinking instead of expanding.

I thought that the higher the first number and the lower the second is (usually down to 20) the better.
The lower the first number is, the better. A speaker that can play down to 30hz will produce deeper bass than a speaker that can only produce bass down to 50hz, therefore it has a greater dynamic range.
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Old 01-04-06, 02:59 PM
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Ok, NOW I get it.

Thanks guys for clearing that up. I'll chalk it up to a blonde moment.
I neglected to remember that 20 kHz was 20,000 Hz.
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