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Is Laserdisc just as good as DVD?

Old 09-10-02, 12:57 AM
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Is Laserdisc just as good as DVD?

Just wanted to know because I have amassed 'bout a 200 DVD collection already but was not really interested in collecting when laserdisc made it debut and have never seen a player in operation. Wanted to know if it was worth my time to purchase someone's old LD collection off EBAY and maybe get some movies on the cheap.

NN

p.s didn't really know where this thread should go but thought this was the most logical choice
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Old 09-10-02, 01:17 AM
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If LD were as good as DVD, we'd have never heard of DVD, and the name of this website would be www.ldtalk.com
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Old 09-10-02, 02:17 PM
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Both formats have their strengths and weaknesses. LD picture quality tends to be very dependant on the quality of the player you use. An excellent player like the Pioneer CLD-D704 can be gotten these days for about $350, which is around the same price as a good DVD player.

This topic has been hashed out to death. See the link in my sig below for more details about the laserdisc format.
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Old 09-10-02, 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by renaldow
If LD were as good as DVD, we'd have never heard of DVD, and the name of this website would be www.ldtalk.com
If DVD is half as good as laserdisc, it will last a decade before a new format comes along to challenge it (LD lasted two decades).
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Old 09-10-02, 05:59 PM
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FWIW, I got into LD after I got into DVD, but mostly only to get things like the Star Wars trilogy. I had the widescreen tapes, but the quality just isn't there. I have since collected a few little odds and ends on LD, but I wouldn't recommend doing it unless you have specific titles you want to get.
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Old 09-10-02, 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by Josh Z
If DVD is half as good as laserdisc, it will last a decade before a new format comes along to challenge it (LD lasted two decades).
You can't judge the quality of a format by how long it took technology to replace it. Beta was far superior to VHS, Beta didn't last long at all. 8 Track was also superior to cassette, but didn't last nearly as long. Vinyl is inferior to CD, but look how long that lasted compared to how long it took CD to replace it.

Marketing and licensing make a format popular, quality takes a back seat. Also, in the last 20 years technology in general has sped up remarkably compared to the 80 years before it. I don't think we'll see a 20 year lifespan on any new format again, if we do I owe you a dollar.
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Old 09-10-02, 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by renaldow
You can't judge the quality of a format by how long it took technology to replace it. Beta was far superior to VHS, Beta didn't last long at all. 8 Track was also superior to cassette, but didn't last nearly as long. Vinyl is inferior to CD, but look how long that lasted compared to how long it took CD to replace it.

Marketing and licensing make a format popular, quality takes a back seat. Also, in the last 20 years technology in general has sped up remarkably compared to the 80 years before it. I don't think we'll see a 20 year lifespan on any new format again, if we do I owe you a dollar.
2 points:
Considering Beta was just phased out this year, I'd say it lasted about 20 years as well

Vinyl is superior to CD. So there

Quality takes a back seat to marketing? I guess we come from two different schools of thought, 'cause I don't care how much polish you put on a turd, I'm not buying it. Maybe to the sheep-minded masses who graze blindly on the plains of mediocrity and banality, and who care more about WAF then quality, but I still like to think there are like-minded consumers out there who don't buy all the hype that's being force-fed to them by big business and strive for products that are well-made and perform up to par, regardless of cost or obscurity.

But that's just me. YMMV.
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Old 09-11-02, 11:43 PM
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Originally posted by DVD_O_Rama
Quality takes a back seat to marketing? I guess we come from two different schools of thought, 'cause I don't care how much polish you put on a turd, I'm not buying it.
I assume you're not posting that message on a computer with an MS OS installed then, right?

Right, there are always people who buy what they think is best, regardless of cost. DVHS is a good example of that, and that's not what I'm talking about.

LD is a good example, a good quality format that while mildly popular, didn't go anywhere near taking over VHS in 20+ years of existence. Manufacturers could've cut costs on equipment and software, pushed it hard and made it mainstream. They decided to keep resources going to backing VHS instead, so the average persons opinion on LD is that they're big funny (and expensive) discs that you have to flip. DVD comes around, and after 4 years or so has become mainstream, and if it weren't for the inability to record, it probably would have even more wider acceptance. That's all marketing. That's what I mean.
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Old 09-12-02, 07:43 AM
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Off the beaten path...recordable DVD does exist now, both standalone machines and computer-based units. Did you not get the memo?

And btw...OS 9
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Old 09-12-02, 12:01 PM
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Actually...i've always seen a big different in quality between laserdisc and dvd. DVD has amazing clarity in comparison. Of course, it also depends on the transfer (as dvd does) but from what i've encountered, a bad dvd transfer is still better than a bad laser transfer. The sound is where laserdisc REALLY shined. I've always felt that the sound of a laserdisc was much fuller and had more of a punch to it. DVD sounds thin in comparison.

Just my opinion tho...
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Old 09-12-02, 12:20 PM
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Laserdisc wasn't mainstream, but it was THE format for home theater. Another thing, Laserdisc is analog, so you don't see any of the pixellation that you occasionally get on DVD. Finally, there are thousands of titles that are on Laserdisc, but not DVD, and many will NEVER make it to DVD.
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Old 09-12-02, 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by digitalfreaknyc
Actually...i've always seen a big different in quality between laserdisc and dvd. DVD has amazing clarity in comparison.
Laserdisc picture quality is highly dependant on the quality of the player being used, much more so than DVD.

With a good player properly set up, a well-mastered laserdisc should look very close in quality to a non-anamorphic DVD.

Last edited by Josh Z; 09-13-02 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 09-12-02, 10:31 PM
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Originally posted by DVD_O_Rama
Off the beaten path...recordable DVD does exist now, both standalone machines and computer-based units. Did you not get the memo?

And btw...OS 9
I disregard memos until they break the $300 price point.
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Old 09-13-02, 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by Josh Z
Laserdisc picture quality is highly dependant on the quality of the player being used, much more so than DVD.

With a good player properly set up, a well-mastered laserdisc should look very close in quality to a non-anamorphic DVD.
I totally agree with Josh...

To renaldow:
You realize they made LD players that had the flip option, they even had a LD player that could hold 2 disc simulateously (also with flip).

For me the killer for LD was cumbersome size, non-recordability, and the S-L-O-W start-ups and stops. I have nearly 150 LD's and finally watched my newest LD (Japanese copy) of Phantom Menace and I couldn't believe how long it took to get the disc spinning!!! I have the CLD-D704 which is probably the starting point of truly good players out there... The sound was STUNNING!!!
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Old 09-13-02, 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by renaldow
I disregard memos until they break the $300 price point.
How about this memo:

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...tby=14&order=1
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Old 09-13-02, 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by jinhopark
For me the killer for LD was cumbersome size, non-recordability, and the S-L-O-W start-ups and stops. I have nearly 150 LD's and finally watched my newest LD (Japanese copy) of Phantom Menace and I couldn't believe how long it took to get the disc spinning!!! I have the CLD-D704 which is probably the starting point of truly good players out there...
The D704's startup speed shouldn't be that slow, and it should be a nearly instantaneous stop. You may want to look into having the spindle cleaned. I can send you instructions, if you'd like.

I really don't see how startup speed is a valid complaint considering that laserdiscs do not have lengthy or confusingly-designed animated menus, or unskippable FBI warnings.

You can get to the movie content on a laserdisc substantially faster than on most DVDs.
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Old 09-13-02, 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by skar
How about this memo:

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...tby=14&order=1
Internal PC drives don't count! I had a PC at one time with a tape drive too, but I didn't think it was as good as my VCR.

It's gotta be standalone to hookup to my TV cable and VCR so that I can copy all my Love Boat VHS over and get DVD quality audio/video!
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Old 09-13-02, 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by jinhopark
To renaldow:
You realize they made LD players that had the flip option, they even had a LD player that could hold 2 disc simulateously (also with flip).
Yep, they do have those. I had a couple of friends who were really big into LD. I even had a hand me down player for a little while. I think my main problem with LD was just with the size of the platters. I always found them humorously large for some reason.
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Old 09-14-02, 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by renaldow
You can't judge the quality of a format by how long it took technology to replace it. Beta was far superior to VHS, Beta didn't last long at all. 8 Track was also superior to cassette, but didn't last nearly as long. Vinyl is inferior to CD, but look how long that lasted compared to how long it took CD to replace it.

Marketing and licensing make a format popular, quality takes a back seat. Also, in the last 20 years technology in general has sped up remarkably compared to the 80 years before it. I don't think we'll see a 20 year lifespan on any new format again, if we do I owe you a dollar.
Off topic a little but this year is the final year Sony will be making the Beta machine. Yes that is correct!!!! They will only make 2000 units this year and its done. Betamax can RIP. Now anyone who knows anything about beta would tell you right off the picture and sound were better then VHS.

Now on LD. I would have to say for the time (mid 80's and 90"s) LD was the best thing out there. I had about 90 LD's until last year when I sold them on Ebay along w/ both of my machines. I did keep 3 LD. They are Star Wars SE Boxed Set, E.T. Boxed Set (only 8007 were ever made), and Aladin. From my understanding SW:TPM was the last LD produced.

One other item on LD. Did any of you see a LD commercial? Now I grew up in the 80's and I never say one. That is a major reason it failed also. One of the reasons I got into LD was the price. A new VHS movie would be $94.99 when it came out usually for the 1st few months. Now they would release it on LD for about $29.99. That was a huge savings. There was a little Video store near my house that rented LD's also. So I would rent the movies and record them to my SVHS player.

Last edited by TheKobra; 09-14-02 at 01:17 AM.
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Old 09-14-02, 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by TheKobra
From my understanding SW:TPM was the last LD produced.
No, there were quite a few laserdiscs released after that including The World Is Not Enough, M:I-2, The 6th Day, and The Cell. The final movie laserdisc was released in September of last year.
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Old 09-15-02, 09:43 PM
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not to grave dig, but I must agree with the folks. LD quality was just as good as DVD and in some cases, one was better over the other.

as for disc flipping and all that. this is part of why LD's never hit the mainstream mass appeal.

Just like how beta has better quality over VHS.. it seems the masses wanted a longer record time. LD's size also factored into it.

Though I am a lover of LD's. I can understand why they didn't hit it big, but I must recommand to anyone to get into it now. with prices just about dirt cheap for movies. it's well worth it to get the titles that will never see the light of day on DVD.
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Old 09-16-02, 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by Josh Z
The D704's startup speed shouldn't be that slow, and it should be a nearly instantaneous stop. You may want to look into having the spindle cleaned. I can send you instructions, if you'd like.

I really don't see how startup speed is a valid complaint considering that laserdiscs do not have lengthy or confusingly-designed animated menus, or unskippable FBI warnings.

You can get to the movie content on a laserdisc substantially faster than on most DVDs.
Josh,

Yes please send me the spindle cleaning instructions...

I guess I can see your point about the unskippable FBI warnings and stuff like that... Although on my Pioneer DVD (model 47A) player the startup is quite fast, much faster than other DVD makes and models that I have seen/used.

-Jinho
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Old 09-16-02, 11:22 AM
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Originally posted by jinhopark
Yes please send me the spindle cleaning instructions...
See this link.
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Old 09-16-02, 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by Jackskeleton
Just like how beta has better quality over VHS.. it seems the masses wanted a longer record time.
What the masses wanted had nothing to do with it. When Beta and VHS were competing Sony was charging licensing fees on Beta player and tapes. RCA & Co (the developers of VHS, I don't remember the other names) realized that if VHS lost out they would end up eating the development, manufacturing and marketing costs of VHS, as well as now having to pay Sony money for every player and tape they made. So, they decided to thwart Sony by offering free licensing on VHS. Manufacturers went with what was free to make and sell, and Beta (to the home user) became a dead format.

I believe Sony released CD technology as a free license because of that, but I may be wrong.
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