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Just bought HDTV - images aren't quite wide enough! Please help

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Just bought HDTV - images aren't quite wide enough! Please help

Old 07-31-02, 07:06 PM
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Just bought HDTV - images aren't quite wide enough! Please help

I finally got an HDTV, a 51" Sony KP51HW40.

The problem is that I'm not getting the right aspect ratio on anamorphic 2.35:1 DVDs. I'm watching in Full mode (which I know is at least closest to giving me the right image) and my DVD player (Malata) is definitely set to the right component inputs and 16X9 mode. The bars are present on the top and bottom, as they should be, but they are not as big as they should be, and thus the left and right edges are being cut off.

This is how it appeared to me as I was first watching movies on it yesterday, but today I decided to check, going to the anamophic guide on thedigitalbits.


I got out my Criterion Rushmore, and paused on this image. As I suspected, the height is perfect - I checked with Max's shoes and the treelines, and they are perfect. The problem is the sides. On the left, I barely get the start of the rear wheel that's farthest left. And on the right, I don't get any of the last tree that you see on the right.

I don't have measuring tape, but it appears to be about 2:1 or 2.1:1, with just those parts of the sides cut off.

I've fiddled with this for hours and read all the links I could find on it.

Any suggestions would be extremely appreciated! Thanks!

NOTE - the image above is of course how it's supposed to look - I don't have a digital camera, but I've described as best I can how my image is messed up.

Last edited by JonTurner; 07-31-02 at 07:39 PM.
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Old 07-31-02, 07:58 PM
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It's the overscan that all projection TVs do. Review this thread for answers http://www.dvdtalk.com/forum/showthr...ght=%2Aover%2A
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Old 07-31-02, 10:31 PM
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Thanks for the link - I contacted Sony, and they'll pay for a local technician to come out and adjust it.

I guess what I don't understand is in the thread you linked to, you (and others) are saying things like you want the 3 - 5% overscan, that it's fine to lose that much picture - and it's not something that should be fixed.

Am I wrong in wanting the full, correct image to be displayed? It seems to me that I'm missing a good 8 - 10%, and to me that's definitely worth fixing. But it sounds like you're saying that if I get it fixed so that I get the exact same picture on my screen as the Rushmore pic shows above, that I'll probably see over things, like TV shows or whatnot, a little messed up, seeing "excess signal crap" and things like that.
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Old 08-01-02, 12:40 PM
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If there is no overscan you will see the vertical interval. You do not want to see this. The vertical interval is where closed captioning is located in its encoded state. It looks like a bunch of white lines and dots that are constantly moving; this can be incredibly distracting. 3-5% overscan is very good, 8-10% is bad. With 3-5% overscan you probably won't even notice anything missing.

You have to keep in mind that movies are composed for projection in a theater at a specific aspect ratio. Overscan doesn't exist in this realm. Television, on the otherhand, is composed with this in mind. When composing a program for TV one must keep two things in mind: the safe-action zone and the safe-title zone. Basically you have an invisible box just within the overscan. No important information should be placed outside this box. This isn't done in film and it is why you appear to be missing "important" information when you watch a film on TV.
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Old 08-01-02, 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by Danny_boy
You have to keep in mind that movies are composed for projection in a theater at a specific aspect ratio. Overscan doesn't exist in this realm.
That's not precisely correct. There can be great disparity in projection standards from theater to theater, and most cinematographers know enough not to compose with important picture information at the extreme edges of the frame, because it will likely be cut off by the theater's matte box. It's not called overscan, but it amounts to the same principle.

Also, the nature of photographic composition is really not as exact as most home-video buffs would assume. What a camera operator sees through their viewfinder may not be exactly what gets exposed onto the film negative. There is usally a small amount of leeway around all four edges. Again, most DPs compensate for this.
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Old 08-01-02, 02:53 PM
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My point was that overscan (referring to an electronic image that is larger than the viewable area of a TV set, hence overscan) is inherent to video. It is not inherent to film. There is nothing to scan. Film is projected. And as I said in my post film is composed for a specific aspect ratio.

Also, you may want to note that I wrote "important" information, not important information (notice the use of quotation marks indicating that what the original poster considers to be a vital part of the image may not necessarily be).
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Old 08-01-02, 02:58 PM
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Overscan is present because as your TV ages, the picture shrinks.
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