DVD & Home Theater Gear Discuss DVD and Home Theater Equipment.

RCA Big Screen, burn image

Old 07-16-02, 02:51 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 460
RCA Big Screen, burn image

Not sure if this is the right place, if not sorry.
Last night I got a mark download RCA Big Screen Home Theatre PTV, screen size 52'. It was only $800 that is why I got it. It plays great but last night I did notice something i didnt see at the store. When there is a lot of white on the screen I can see the words WALMART TV. Its right in the middle. I guess this image got 'burned' into the screen somehow when it was on display. Its not to bad and for $800 I can live with it. BUt is there away to get this fixed? Is there away to get it out? Any help at all please.
thank you

Darin
0rac is offline  
Old 07-16-02, 02:58 PM
  #2  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: USA
Posts: 12,201
Short of replacing the screen, no there is no way that I know of to "fix" it. Explains why it was the price it was.
Brian Shannon is offline  
Old 07-16-02, 03:02 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 460
Thanks

Thanks for the info, for $800 i am still glad i got it. I mean I never see a 52' this cheap but then again i never been looking. I could pay over $1000 for a TV, not right now.
Do you know what can cause this 'burn'? I ask cause I want to make sure I dont get anymore on the screen. I heard years ago that playing video games on a big screen could do this. Is that ture?
thanks
Darin
0rac is offline  
Old 07-16-02, 03:07 PM
  #4  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: USA
Posts: 12,201
Do you know what can cause this 'burn'? I ask cause I want to make sure I dont get anymore on the screen. I heard years ago that playing video games on a big screen could do this. Is that ture?
The constant display of an image has burned it onto the screen and yes that is true with video games especially ones that have static displays for scores, health etc.
Brian Shannon is offline  
Old 07-16-02, 03:12 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 460
One more question, sorry for so many
How long does an image have to stay on the screen to 'burn' it? I do play video games that show score or other things at the top of the screen. However I hardly ever play games for more than an hour or two a day.
Do you know of a good website for info on all this? So I dont have to keep asking here.
thanks
Darin
0rac is offline  
Old 07-17-02, 08:43 AM
  #6  
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jun 1999
Location: USA
Posts: 12,201
Here are a few quick notes on burn-in from video specialist Mr Bob:

Keep Contrast down to a max of 75% of the light level your eyes tell you your TV can do. 50% is even better, during the first 100 hours. Your phosphors are brand new, and very virgin. They need to be treated as such, with lotsa TLC.
CRT phosphors have very predictable lifespan, and can be nursed to be virtually as bright as ever for 10-15 years, if handled right. A brand new RPTV will have phosphors that are ultra-bright for few months, of course, and if you want to dazzle yourself silly, you can. But it will come off the brightness capacity of your TV at the other end, years down the line, if you do. Adjusting room lighting accordingly is a much better way of handling the desire for an ultra-bright picture.
NO FIXED IMAGES, for any length of time, EVER! This means video games with fixed borders, ticker tape bands, menu images, strong bright logos like MSNBC...
If these fixed images are necessary -- say you run stock ticker tapes all day on CNN or whatever -- turn you Contrast down low. If just burning in your brand new RPTV and not watching it during lengthy periods of time, turn your Contrast down to ZER0. Phosphors are not what is needed to be exercised, during burn-in.
To preserve your phosphors after the burn-in period, keep contrast down low when viewing non-visually-challenging material, like Jay Leno's monologue every night. You don't really need to see the picture bright and crisp and clear and dazzling in cases like this, and not constantly pushing your phosphors to be always at their brightest will increase their lifespan in later years, down the line.
Don't just run the TV for 100 hours straight. Expansion and contraction due to heat up and cool down are a strong part of a TV's burn-in, and must be honored. So make sure that no matter how much you run it during the daytime, let it get absolutely cold overnight before you start it up again next day.
Following these procedures will allow you to safely burn-in your new RPTV in a matter of days, if necessary.


http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/learnabout/burnin.html
Brian Shannon is offline  
Old 07-18-02, 02:25 PM
  #7  
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 111
Just to highlight something, burn in is not burned images in the screen. So if someone recommends replacing your screen, don't. It is one or all of the CRTs that got ruined by the constant image. Depending on the color of the constant image.
doroshjt is offline  
Old 07-18-02, 05:37 PM
  #8  
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 1,247
Sorry to thread crap, but I got a laugh out of Brian Shannon using Jay Leno as an example of non-challenging material.
kunert is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.