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DVD player video bugs Info

Old 01-15-02, 01:38 PM
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DVD player video bugs Info

Hey is there a good site that discusses the various existing "video bugs" ? E.g. the red chroma bug, and any other errors existing in the DVD format. The reason I ask is because I have not been able to find out the source/cause in what I call the blue flare phenomenon that I first noticed in Pearl Harbor... Die Hard also had it.
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Old 01-15-02, 02:04 PM
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The chroma bug exists in hardware not in software. If your disc was defective then it would be a media/transfer issue.

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...e-10-2000.html
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Old 01-16-02, 02:51 PM
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I see you haven't received much help mike......i don't know what to tell you either!!
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Old 01-20-02, 06:44 PM
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Oh well thanks anyway Kip! the link above is very helpful
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Old 01-20-02, 10:12 PM
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Re: DVD player video bugs Info

Originally posted by gamecockmike
Hey is there a good site that discusses the various existing "video bugs" ? E.g. the red chroma bug, and any other errors existing in the DVD format. The reason I ask is because I have not been able to find out the source/cause in what I call the blue flare phenomenon that I first noticed in Pearl Harbor... Die Hard also had it.

Can you further explain the blue flare phenomenon in Pearl Harbor?(when does it occur, what it looks like?) I think I know which part you are talking about
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Old 01-21-02, 01:59 AM
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One of the only DVD players I know that does not have the Chroma Red error is the Panasonic RP91k.
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Old 01-21-02, 11:43 AM
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The Pearl Harbor "blue flares" occured all throughout the movie. Here are a few specific examples:
24:48; 25:44; 1:25:05; 1:31:40[Red]; 1:31:46; 1:56; and 1:58:30 thru 1:58:34 There were many others but these were seen in a fast forward review for this post. Die Hard was another movie(rental, so I don't have any times) that was particularly bad. Less noticeable are the "flares" that immediately coincide with light sources and could be interpreted as "normal". What is really bad is when the "flares" exist without obvious light source or cover up the movie unnaturally, i.e. "behind" where the light source could really go.
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Old 01-29-02, 01:34 AM
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Here is some info that I have found at a great site:

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/rec-video/dvd-faq/

[1.3] What's the quality of DVD-Video?

DVD has the capability to produce near-studio-quality video and
better-than-CD-quality audio. DVD is vastly superior to videotape and
generally better than laserdisc (see 2.8.). However, quality depends on
many production factors. As compression experience and technology improves
we will see increasing quality, but as production costs decrease we will
also see more shoddily produced discs. A few low-budget DVDs will even use
MPEG-1 encoding (which is no better than VHS) instead of higher-quality
MPEG-2.

DVD video is usually encoded from digital studio master tapes to MPEG-2
format. The encoding process uses lossy compression that removes redundant
information (such as areas of the picture that don't change) and
information that's not readily perceptible by the human eye. The resulting
video, especially when it is complex or changing quickly, may sometimes
contain visual flaws, depending on the processing quality and amount of
compression. At average rates of 3.5 Mbps (million bits/second),
compression artifacts may be occasionally noticeable. Higher data rates can
result in higher quality, with almost no perceptible difference from the
master at rates above 6 Mbps. As MPEG compression technology improves,
better quality is being achieved at lower rates.

Video from DVD sometimes contains visible artifacts such as color banding,
blurriness, blockiness, fuzzy dots, shimmering, missing detail, and even
effects such as a face that "floats" behind the rest of the moving picture.
It's important to understand that the term "artifact" refers to anything
that was not originally present in the picture. Artifacts are sometimes
caused by poor MPEG encoding, but artifacts are more often caused by a
poorly adjusted TV, bad cables, electrical interference, sloppy digital
noise reduction, improper picture enhancement, poor film-to-video transfer,
film grain, player faults, disc read errors, etc. Most DVDs exhibit few
visible MPEG compression artifacts on a properly configured system.. If you
think otherwise, you are misinterpreting what you see.

Some early DVD demos were not very good, but this is simply an indication
of how bad DVD can be if not properly processed and correctly reproduced.
Many demo discs were rushed through the encoding process in order to be
distributed as quickly as possible. Contrary to common opinion, and as
stupid as it may seem, these demos were not carefully "tweaked" to show DVD
at its best. In-store demos should be viewed with a grain of salt, since
most salespeople are incapable of properly adjusting a television set. Most
TVs have the sharpness set too high for the clarity of DVD. This
exaggerates high-frequency video and causes distortion, just as the treble
control set too high for a CD causes it to sound harsh. Many DVD players
output video with a black-level setup of 0 IRE (Japanese standard) rather
than 7.5 IRE (US standard). On TVs that are not properly adjusted this can
cause some blotchiness in dark scenes. DVD video has exceptional color
fidelity, so muddy or washed-out colors are almost always a problem in the
display (or the original source), not in the DVD player or disc.
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