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New RPTV, I have a burn-in question.

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New RPTV, I have a burn-in question.

Old 12-23-01, 01:03 AM
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New RPTV, I have a burn-in question.

Hey, my new 4:3 Non-HDTV RPTV was just delivered on Thursday (and boy do I love it.) Anyway, I looked in the FAQ and did a search and didn't find an answer so I thought I'd pose it here. I know static image combined with high brightness/contrast setting can cause burn in, but what effect do the black bars of a widescreen formated film have on the TV? They are indeed static for the 2 hr run time of the film so can they cause burn in?

I've calibrated using THX Optimode (waiting to rent Avia) but have been careful to avoid watching two or three DVD's in a row till I can find out the answer to this question. Thanks guys.
Old 12-23-01, 01:23 AM
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If you turn the contrast way down, as you will after doing a proper calibration, there's nothing to worry about in the short run. However over time the effect must build up. If you mix the source material with broadcast TV, as you must be doing since you bought a 4:3 set, I wouldn't worry about it.

I have a 16:9 set, primarily watch DVDs on it, and still end up watching material that is less than fullscreen about 50% of the time. I have some worries that I'll see something some years in the future, but since I keep the contrast so low it will probably be many years in the future.
Old 12-23-01, 01:26 AM
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Yes, the black bars in a wide-screen movie will cause burn-in patterns on an RPTV.

Actually, it is not the black portion that is burned in. Rather, the phosphors in the 'lighted' part would burn/wear out first, thus causing an uneven image on screen. There was a posting here many months back of someone trying to sue Toshiba or Mitsubishi over this matter because the warranty doesn't cover such a defect.

Anyway, just remember to keep the contrast and brightness level low and it should be OK. Enjoy your new TV and don't be too paranoid over this.
Old 12-23-01, 09:19 AM
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As long as you're not watching widescreen material most of the time, I don't think you'll have anything to worry about. My last 4:3 RPTV never showed any signs of uneven wear after 2 years and I watched DVDs on it at least 30% of the time and had the contrast set at 50% (which may be kind of high, I admit). I worry much more about station logos than anything else.
Old 12-23-01, 11:56 AM
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Re: New RPTV, I have a burn-in question.

Originally posted by clemente
Anyway, I looked in the FAQ and did a search and didn't find an answer so I thought I'd pose it here.
My mistake for leaving it out of the FAQ. I will add it in.

It will cause burn-in, but as others have said, it depends on the percentage of your TV viewing of sources with black bars. It will not burn in as fast as other types of static images, especially ones with color.
Old 12-23-01, 12:23 PM
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It would be good to also define the risk of burn in regards to 16:9 screens, RPTV, Tube sets, LCDs/Shutter screens, and Plasma sets. This is a big issue and a FAQ.
Old 12-23-01, 07:06 PM
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Hey thanks guys, not only for your knowledge but your swiftness.

As a note, per the Optimode, I keep contrast at ~17 and brightness at about ~40 (which seems high, but the set looks fine during the day, but quite bright at night)
Old 12-24-01, 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by clemente
Hey thanks guys, not only for your knowledge but your swiftness.

As a note, per the Optimode, I keep contrast at ~17 and brightness at about ~40 (which seems high, but the set looks fine during the day, but quite bright at night)
Those settings aren't high at all. You shouldn't have much to worry about with contrast that low. I think you can get away with setting your brightness fairly high if you want, it's contrast that's the cause of burn-in (at least that's what I've read).
Old 12-24-01, 01:07 AM
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Originally posted by clemente
As a note, per the Optimode, I keep contrast at ~17 and brightness at about ~40 (which seems high, but the set looks fine during the day, but quite bright at night)
To give you some perspective, I rarely use my set during the day since I can't cut out the ambient light. So the settings I have are not too bright for night viewing. I would be concerned if you did a majority of your viewing at levels that allowed daytime viewing if you can't darken the room.

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