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Any suggestions on modern pulp / adventure books [Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc.]?

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Any suggestions on modern pulp / adventure books [Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc.]?

Old 04-01-02, 07:01 AM
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Modern pulp fiction?

I'm totally hooked on reading Edgar Rice Burroughs. Not much in the way of character development, but his serial type pulp fiction is wonderful.

Are there any modern pulp writers I should be aware of?
Old 04-01-02, 08:29 AM
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I guess it depends what you mean by "modern writer". And what you mean by "pulp"

Michael Moorcock has churned/hacked out a huge number of volumes in his loosely connected Eternal Champions "series".

Moorcock cites Burroughs as an early influence and, in the 60s, penned an homage: Kane of Old Mars.

He has also written some rather good stuff such as Mother London and Gloriana.
Old 04-01-02, 09:56 AM
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Originally posted by benedict
I guess it depends what you mean by "modern writer". And what you mean by "pulp"
I guess by modern I mean someone still living and producing. Burroughs was around when the old pulp/serial stuff was popular. Not sure if it's even written anymore.

By pulp I mean, well, I'm not sure what I mean. I guess just plain ol adventure yarns, sci-fi or otherwise. Fiction that includes the hero getting into trouble, then out, then repeat.

I might have to look up that KANE OF OLD MARS.
Old 04-01-02, 09:25 PM
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I don't know what you mean by "Modern," but a few years back I read all six of the books by Delacorte. The second book in the series was turned into the french movie,"Diva."( One of my favorite movies and its the reason I read the books.) The author is also french and the books are about a well off ex-mobster/ex-con artist ( Serge) and his soul-mate/ward named Alba( Hey, Serge tells they must wait til she's of age and nothings done in any of the books...what do you want its french) who now is sort of a modern Robin Hood, helping out the underdog. Anyway, their good books( I think I've seen the first , "Alba" on amazon)
Old 04-01-02, 10:01 PM
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This is some REAL pulp...(I used to read these in high school):

www.mackbolan.com

The Mack Bolan stuff is pure pulpy goodness!
Old 04-02-02, 06:53 PM
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I think the Tekwar novels by William Shatner fall into the category you're describing. I actually really enjoyed them.

Also, some of Richard Laymon's novels (mainly because of his writing style) might be considered modern day pulp fiction.
Old 04-03-02, 12:09 PM
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<small>
Originally posted by Xytraguptorh
I think the Tekwar novels by William Shatner fall into the category you're describing. I actually really enjoyed them.
</small>I've not read any TekWar but anyone that liked those books might care to try out the other works of Ron Goulart....
Old 04-03-02, 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by benedict
<small></small>I've not read any TekWar but anyone that liked those books might care to try out the other works of Ron Goulart....
benedict, are you seriously implying that Shatner didn't write the Tek novels himself? If so, I had no idea. I feel cheated now. They're not really examples of great American literature, but they're fun to read and flow pretty well, so I've always kind of admired Shatner for his writing ability.
Old 04-04-02, 10:31 AM
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Ooops! Sorry, Xytraguptorh.

Yes, it is an open secret that Ron Goulart did most of the work on those books. I heard that Mr Shatner thanked him for his "help" at the front of some/all of them....

.... in fact, a web-search of just a few seconds ago threw up references to Goulart's role as a "co-writer", "co-author" a "ghostwriter" and a "consultant" on the series.

The best info I could find just now is here if you read all the way through.

A positive way of looking at it is that, if you enjoyed the books, you can now try Goulart's other work - which is said to be better.
Old 09-13-03, 11:00 AM
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Need suggestions on adventure books, like Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc..

I am looking for some good books on adventure. Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider things like that.
Old 09-13-03, 05:12 PM
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Star Wars is always a good bet. The new story arc "New Jedi Order" is really good so far. Plus a lot of the old ones are good too. I recommend "I, Jedi" from the older books.
Old 09-18-03, 04:03 PM
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there were several good Indiana Jones books written several years ago. Check out Indiana Jones and the Genesis Deluge and Indiana Jones and the Philosopher's Stone, which has NOTHING to do with Harry Potter

They are both good reads. Most of the Indy books are written by Max McCoy and Rob MacGregor. With a few by Martin Caidin, the genius who brought us the great book Cyborg (which spun off a little known tv show called $6 Million Man).
Old 09-19-03, 10:10 AM
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I don't know if this falls into the "pulp fiction" category or not but I have really enjoyed Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt novels. They are Indiana Jones meets James Bond type books. Also I used to really enjoy the old Doc Savage books. Bantam books released all of them in the 60's to the 70's. Somewhere around 150 stories total. They are very fun and fast reads. Check out your local used bookstores as they have been out of print for years. Kenneth Robeson is a pen name used for several authors that wrote the stories originally released in a monthly pulp magazine. You can also download many in PDF form from www.blackmask.com . You might check out the "Avenger" stories and also "The Shadow". All these I have suggested are action adventure type stories. Enjoy!

Ktrek
Old 09-19-03, 12:32 PM
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Matthew Reily's Temple is a good Indiana Jones-esque adventure novel.
Old 10-14-10, 09:10 AM
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Tubb draft SF Encyclopedia entry: http://sfe3.org/sf.php?id=9Kltl3093Tfo#1

Originally Posted by bishop2knight
I'm totally hooked on reading Edgar Rice Burroughs. Not much in the way of character development, but his serial type pulp fiction is wonderful.

Are there any modern pulp writers I should be aware of?
Just read an obituary of EC Tubb and was reminded of this thread.

In addition to his (Leigh Bracket-inspired?) Dumarest books, which may well fit the bill and concluded recently with Child of Earth, there's also his (REH-inspired?) Malkar books: Death God's Doom and The Sleeping City.

The first seems available via Amazon Marketplace, although the second may require a bit more of a search for a copy be it used or unused.

<small>PS) Looks like Moorcock's Kane of Mars is also currently available (used): http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...condition=used
Old 10-14-10, 10:10 AM
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Re: Any suggestions on modern pulp / adventure books [Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc

Wow, 7 years!

Bishop, have you heard of the Gabriel Hunt series?
Old 10-14-10, 10:12 AM
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Re: Any suggestions on modern pulp / adventure books [Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc

Im not sure if you would consider it modern pulp. But the books written by Clive Cussler probably fall under this category. Both his Dirk Pitt and Kurt Austin series are pretty good.

Here is what Wikipedia has to Say about his Literary Career:

Clive Cussler began writing in 1965 when his wife took a job working nights for the local police department where they lived in California. After making dinner for the kids and putting them to bed he had no one to talk to and nothing to do so he decided to start writing.[7] His most famous creation is marine engineer, government agent and adventurer Dirk Pitt. The Dirk Pitt novels frequently take on an alternative history perspective, such as "what if Atlantis was real?", or "what if Abraham Lincoln wasn't assassinated, but was kidnapped?"

The first two Pitt novels, The Mediterranean Caper and Iceberg, were relatively conventional maritime thrillers. The third, Raise the Titanic!, made Cussler's reputation and established the pattern that subsequent Pitt novels would follow: a blend of high adventure and high technology, generally involving megalomaniacal villains, lost ships, beautiful women, and sunken treasure.

Cussler's novels, like those of Michael Crichton, are examples of techno-thrillers that do not use military plots and settings. Where Crichton strove for scrupulous realism, however, Cussler prefers fantastic spectacles and outlandish plot devices. The Pitt novels, in particular, have the anything-goes quality of the James Bond or Indiana Jones movies, while also sometimes borrowing from Alistair MacLean's novels. Pitt himself is a larger-than-life hero reminiscent of Doc Savage and other characters from pulp magazines.



Anyway Ive read quite a few of his books and they are pretty fun reads.
Old 02-27-12, 09:28 PM
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Re: Any suggestions on modern pulp / adventure books [Indiana Jones, Tomb Raider, etc

I read an Indiana Jones-style adventure novel set in medieval Arabia. The Amazing Voyage of Azzam. It also owes a lot to Ray Harryhausen movies and the cover is reminiscent of a 1970s movie poster. The ending (when the treasure is found) is very cinematic.

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