DVD Talk
All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum

PDA

View Full Version : All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records


VHS?
02-24-16, 03:52 PM
All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records (2015)
'All Things Must Pass' is a documentary that explores the rise and fall of Tower Records, and its legacy forged by its rebellious founder, Russ Solomon.
Established in 1960, Tower Records was once a retail powerhouse with two hundred stores, in thirty countries, on five continents. From humble beginnings in a small-town drugstore, Tower Records eventually became the heart and soul of the music world, and a powerful force in the music industry. In 1999, Tower Records made $1 billion. In 2006, the company filed for bankruptcy. What went wrong? Everyone thinks they know what killed Tower Records: The Internet. But that's not the story. "All Things Must Pass" is a feature documentary film examining this iconic company's explosive trajectory, tragic demise, and legacy forged by its rebellious founder Russ Solomon.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3272570/

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DAepjF6_N68?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Damfino
02-24-16, 04:26 PM
I wasn't aware of this movie until today. Like most teenagers of that era, I spent a lot of time at various Tower locations. This just made my short list of movies to watch ASAP.

davidh777
02-24-16, 04:37 PM
I heard about this film recently and want to see it. I used to live at that place.

VHS?
02-24-16, 05:10 PM
I stated in another thread, it was like a religious thing to go to Tower Records. I would go even when I had no money to buy anything. Just browsing the place was something to do if you were bored. Just hop in the car and go.

Mabuse
02-24-16, 05:40 PM
Indeed. There was a great Tower near me when I was in High School and when I was in college in Los Angeles just as DVD was blowing up and Tower Video on Sunset was so fun to browse.

I heard Colin Hanks on the Adam Carolla show promoting this. It sounds great.

Supermallet
02-24-16, 07:47 PM
I saw this when it was playing at the Arclight. It's a decent documentary, but it's hard to feel sorry for the people involved when it all came tumbling down. I would say that it seemed like a very unique place to work, and definitely had a family atmosphere, but that didn't change the fact that Tower and Virgin and the like were ripping people off hand over fist with $18 CDs. They thought the gravy train would never end, and it bit them in the ass.

Mabuse
02-24-16, 08:42 PM
True, but that was the price everywhere. It's not like there was some secret place where you could get them for $10.

They did pretty good with sale prices on new stuff, and the bottom line is they offered a really pleasant and cool shopping experience. They would stock really awesome off the wall stuff. Their book and magazine selection was incredible. Everything from pop culture to manga to really classy hard core porn.

Compared to places like Music Plus (later Blockbuster Music), The Wherehouse, and Sam Goody they were a fucking oasis in the desert.

Why So Blu?
02-24-16, 08:52 PM
They were cool for the hard to find stuff and they had a Ticketmaster and laserdiscs. The first laserdisc I ever bought was from a Tower Records. It was Strange Days.

Mike86
02-24-16, 09:04 PM
I never went to Tower Records but I've heard good things about the documentary. Will probably check it out at some point.

hdnmickey
02-24-16, 09:33 PM
Yeah, if anything Tower more often than not had the best prices on music. Especially during release week. But the real key for me was the in-stock selections. It was very rare they didn't have a title I went to get. The mall stores not only had higher prices, they barely has any selection beyond new releases and the top selling album, or best of collection, for each band or artist.

Chrisedge
02-24-16, 09:39 PM
Funny, I just watched this yesterday! I loved it, and was a hard core Tower guy in the 80's and 90's. They did have the best prices when you caught the sales (release week, etc...) and I never had a problem paying for the stuff that was high because they had it!

Barth
02-24-16, 09:41 PM
True, but that was the price everywhere. It's not like there was some secret place where you could get them for $10.


That was true for a while but it didn't take long for Best Buy to step in and start offering them for 10-12 dollars. That's when I quit going to places like Camelot Music and the like in the mall.
Don't get me wrong when I was young and it was still cassette days, I could spend hours in a place like Camelot. I loved dedicated music stores. Although, when you're a teenage kid with limited funds you have to find the best place to stretch your dollar.
That "feeling" when your favorite artist releases a new album and you go to the record store to pick it up on release day died a long time ago unfortunately. I wish my daughter could experience it but now she just wants iTunes gift cards to pick and choose the songs she likes. :sad:

Giles
02-24-16, 09:55 PM
the stores also had great varied selection of magazines, music and / or otherwise

VHS?
02-24-16, 10:33 PM
Yeah, they were almost a head shop. All they needed were whip-its and pipes.

The LAST think I bought from Tower Records was Pink Floyd - Pulse double CD with blinking LED.
My ex-wife has it ... well she probably lost it. Fuckin bitch.

davidh777
02-24-16, 11:18 PM
Yeah, for me it was the selection of rare items I couldn't find before the days of the Internet. I studied abroad, and the Towers were great there too. :)

I think they had January clearance sales with a few dollars off everything. :dance:

milo bloom
02-24-16, 11:24 PM
Yeah, I used to love picking through the import singles section for oddities but for regular albums it was basically anywhere else that was cheaper ( or more likely just buy it used).

Alan Smithee
02-25-16, 02:36 AM
but that didn't change the fact that Tower and Virgin and the like were ripping people off hand over fist with $18 CDs.

In the 80s, Tower regularly knocked at least a buck or so off the list price- it wasn't til the late 90s that they charged full list price for most things. That along with the greedy record labels raising the list prices up to $18.99 for single discs is what did them in. Some real tools were running Tower its last few years- one guy said that he felt people would be happy to pay full price "just for the experience of shopping in our stores." The rising costs of CDs certainly killed my excitement for buying them by the ton- I used to buy at least 5 per month but now I don't even buy that many in a year- and no, I don't buy mp3s or other digital nonsense in their place!

As I commented elsewhere, the real villains of the story told in the movie were Great American Group, the liquidation firm that bought the Tower company just so they could sell everything off and close it down, and I was very disappointed that they weren't even MENTIONED in it. (By watching the movie, it looks like Russ and company just said "That's it, we're screwed, let's have a Going out of Business sale.") Some other companies wanted to buy it and at least give it another chance, but the liquidators were the highest bidders so they shut it all down and lost about $1 million on the deal when all was said and done, so nobody won in the end.

morriscroy
02-25-16, 07:56 AM
As I commented elsewhere, the real villains of the story told in the movie were Great American Group, the liquidation firm that bought the Tower company just so they could sell everything off and close it down, and I was very disappointed that they weren't even MENTIONED in it. (By watching the movie, it looks like Russ and company just said "That's it, we're screwed, let's have a Going out of Business sale.") Some other companies wanted to buy it and at least give it another chance, but the liquidators were the highest bidders so they shut it all down and lost about $1 million on the deal when all was said and done, so nobody won in the end.

Wonder if the liquidators were more interested in Tower's property holdings, than the actual business itself.

If they actually lost a million dollars in the overall transaction, most likely they used it as a tax writeoff.

DaveNinja
02-25-16, 12:32 PM
I still havent seen it even tough it was playing here (at the Tower Theater) last year. I live about 4 blocks from the original tower records. When Tower was on the decline there would be these awesome clearance sales where everything was super cheap, like 75-90% off the marked price. I would buy so much crap, lol. I still have some "Tower exclusive" Futurama figures that i got for cheap

islandclaws
02-25-16, 01:18 PM
I had a long, lovely relationship with Tower throughout all of my formative years. It was THE place to hang, spending hours browsing and maybe buying a CD or two.

I worked there for about six months in 2001, but I had a horrid little troll of a boss who hated me and saw that I was canned for... wait for it... drinking a soda behind the register. But, man, was that a fun job.

mndtrp
02-25-16, 01:32 PM
Tower was the first and only place I ever stood in line to get concert tickets. KROQ Weenie Roast in '99 that sold out in a couple of minutes, two people behind me.

Great store, had a lot of cool stuff. Suncoast was similar, and also highly priced.

Chrisedge
02-25-16, 02:27 PM
Suncoast and Tower could not have been more different other than the high prices.

hdnmickey
02-25-16, 02:57 PM
In the 80s, Tower regularly knocked at least a buck or so off the list price- it wasn't til the late 90s that they charged full list price for most things.

Exactly. I suspect the major difference between people thinking Tower had lower than average or higher than average prices was all about what era people shopped there. Personally for me it was mostly the 80's. By the time the mid 90's rolled around I lived much farther away from the closest Tower store and this are had finally got some of the chains people are claiming had lower prices. Those people should keep in mind that some areas had Tower stores, but didn't have many of the other chains that could have often been cheaper than Tower.

parker63
02-25-16, 04:30 PM
Really enjoyed this one. The ending of it reminded me of...

...Spinal Tap :)

windom
04-08-16, 04:51 PM
This will be on Showtime tonight.

banthafett
04-08-16, 09:10 PM
Thanks for posting that it will be on tv tonight. Gonna record it.

JeffTheAlpaca
04-13-16, 09:33 AM
Excellent documentary.

It was funny watching Elton John go to Tower and buying multiple copies of the same album to keep at the multiples houses he owned.

Back in the day in the early 90's they did not store their tapes in protective cases or had the security stickers and people would put them in their pockets and walk out of the store.

It still exists online

http://towerrecords.com/

Alan Smithee
04-16-16, 01:01 AM
towerrecords.com was the division I worked for- it had been sold separately from the rest of the stores and assets and was intended to keep going after the stores had closed. We reassured customers that we weren't going anywhere and they'd still be able to order from us, but the first buyer backed out of the sale and a few months later a Canadian company ended up buying it out. We talked to the new owner on a conference call where he said they intended to keep it based in Sacramento and everyone would still have their jobs, and two days after that I and a good percentage of the other staff were laid off. About a month later they relocated everything to Montreal and failed miserably. I don't even know who's running the site now, but don't see why anyone would buy from it.

Rex Fenestrarum
04-16-16, 02:06 AM
Man, I dunno about other Tower stores, but the one at Around Lenox in Atlanta had an awesome classical room! What's more, the guys who worked in the classical room actually knew their shit, which was a pleasant surprise. It was the only music store in town where you could ask for "Johann Jacob Bach" and actually be taken to CDs of his works, and not have the clerk say "Uhh... don't you mean Johann Sebastian Bach?" Or better yet: "Who the hell is Leopold Mozart?"

I did get weirded out one time, though. I picked up a (vinyl) LP by Current 93 or Nurse With Wound or one of those bands, and there was a flyer for a local coven inside. IIRC, it was one of those resealable plastic sleeves, but it was still freaky. TOWER HIRES WITCHES!

DJariya
04-25-16, 02:49 PM
Just noticed that this documentary is now airing on Showtime as Windom mentioned.

I started watching it last night on the Showtime app. So far, really interesting. I'll try to finish the rest today. Didn't realize how much history there was with Tower Records.

I used to shop there a lot in college back in the early 90's when I was a broke college student who could barely afford CDs. I miss them to this day. It was a fun place to browse and occasionally buy stuff.

kahuna
04-25-16, 03:58 PM
Tower Records at Pearl Kai Shopping Center use to be my hangout. Especially when I was going through my divorce. Also great prices when they started blowing out their stock of Laser Discs.
Also 100 feet away was Jelly's.

After reading this thread I thought this movie would be free on Prime but I guess it's not.


Tower Records - Midlife Crisis Hawaii
http://midlifecrisishawaii.com/do-you-remember/do-you-remember-tower-records

Tower Records Closes Hawaii Stores
http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/5826738/tower-records-closes-hawaii-stores

DJariya
04-25-16, 05:12 PM
Just finished it. Great film. If you have access to Showtime, watch it.

Sad seeing the timeline of how the business crumbled in the late 90's and early 2000's when they couldn't adjust to the changing times. CD's got too expensive and then piracy via Napster hurt them. Also competition from the Targets and Best Buys hurt them badly. The documentary also showed they expanded too fast internationally in many markets that they shouldn't have gone into.

I liked seeing the end of the film when 90 year old Russ Solomon traveled to Tokyo to visit a Tower store, since they're apparently still very successful there and his eyes lighted up. I liked seeing how happy he was that his vision is still living on even though it's independently owned by the Japanese now.

I'm very curious how physical media like CDs and DVDs are still successful in Japan where a store like Tower still exists, yet the industry is struggling right now in the U.S.

JeffTheAlpaca
04-25-16, 07:15 PM
Maybe the people in Japan are more savvy and know CDs are better than downloads and they are bigger music fans compared to the people in the U.S.

DJariya
04-25-16, 07:19 PM
Maybe the people in Japan are more savvy and know CDs are better than downloads and they are bigger music fans compared to the people in the U.S.

I also think the problem lies with a lot of millennials in the U.S. who grew up in the download/Napster era and think they're entitled to "free" entertainment and don't believe in purchasing music and movies.

In college, I was making $4.25/$5 per hour and could barely afford new music and movies, but if there was an artist I liked and wanted to support, I would buy their album.

Aside from Tower's bad business decisions, it's those fuckers who don't have jobs and spend their time in their dorm rooms pirating music that put stores like Tower and Virgin Megastore out of business.

AaronHernandez
04-26-16, 04:49 AM
I also think the problem lies with a lot of millennials in the U.S. who grew up in the download/Napster era and think they're entitled to "free" entertainment and don't believe in purchasing music and movies.


The Music industry was just slow to adapt. If it was just a bunch of kids wanting free stuff then you wouldn't have seen a boom in movie sales in the 00's as people starting building film collections something that didn't happen in the VHS era of the 80s and 90s. People got tired of having to buy an entire cd when they didn't necessarily like non album tracks. Basically the casual music fan of a certain youthful age went online and never came back and the casual older listener stopped paying attention to music altogether.And then a lot of people who actually are music connoisseur's just stopped listening to new music. How are new bands gonna ever grow an audience if local rock stations accross the country half their setlist looks like the same as it did in 1998 because a ton of people of a certain age think everything out there being made is basically Taylor Swift-Beyonce and Beiber and the only good music in the world is rock music made btwn the 60s and 90s.

CRM114
04-29-16, 09:58 AM
I watched this movie this week. It was interesting. I didn't know anything about them. In my day, the last place anyone I knew wanted to shop was a corporate record store chain. Seemed cool in the early days.

CRM114
04-29-16, 10:00 AM
True, but that was the price everywhere. It's not like there was some secret place where you could get them for $10.

Of course there was. Like every mom and pop record store that Tower wanted to put out of business.

hdnmickey
04-29-16, 10:15 AM
Some areas must have been far different than others because during the prime period for Tower the locally owned stores did NOT have better prices. Nor did the other big chain competitors (Musicland, Warehouse, Camelot). They locally owned stores were often at least a dollar or two MORE per title, or at best, the same price.

My friends and I would shop the local stores for local independent music or used stuff that the big chains were not carrying yet. Everything else was usually bought one of the two Tower locations in the area.

CRM114
04-29-16, 10:39 AM
It's still like that today around here. Best Buy will sell a CD for $14.99 that a local record shop is selling for 12.99. Locally owned record stores never charged anywhere near list price. I never paid $18.99 for a single CD in my life.

Obi-Wan Jabroni
04-29-16, 12:00 PM
I hung out at Tower a lot when I was in college from 1995-1999, but outside of the one in Ann Arbor, I don't know if there were many/any others in the Metro Detroit area. I had actually never seen one in person before I went to college. And then it was gone from there not long after I graduated.

I loved going there at midnight to get new CD's, which is probably an alien idea to the youth of today.

auto
04-29-16, 03:37 PM
I hung out at Tower a lot when I was in college from 1995-1999, but outside of the one in Ann Arbor, I don't know if there were many/any others in the Metro Detroit area. I had actually never seen one in person before I went to college. And then it was gone from there not long after I graduated.

I loved going there at midnight to get new CD's, which is probably an alien idea to the youth of today.

That's funny. Those are the exact years I was at UofM. I spent countless hours in that store, rarely spending money. I'm sure we crossed paths at some point walking the aisles.

Hiro11
04-29-16, 03:50 PM
The Tower Records at Newbury Street / Mass Ave. in Boston was really good back in the day. I used to go to all of the indie stores in Boston as a kid, but the selection at Tower was hard to beat. Good prices, too. I started going daily for a while circa 1997-ish when I worked in the John Hancock tower and was waiting for my wife to get off of work elsewhere in Copley Square. The first floor had video and memorabilia, the second floor was essentially all CDs. Vinyl and tapes were not sold for a few years there.

The three biggest scores I ever found there:
- A UK import promo version of Swervedriver's "Ejector Seat Reservation", which at the time was essentially impossible to find. The record was never officially released widely due to Creation Records going out of business and related label shenanigans at the time. It was never released at all in the US. I think it's Swervedriver's best album. It remains really hard to find today but most of the tracks are available elsewhere. I paid $24 for this back then, the price tag is still on it.
- The limited edition metal box CD version of PiL's "Metal Box", which in addition to being cool packaging is a stone classic of an album. The untreated steel box has rusted in the years since, making it even cooler. You can get a copy for ~$35 these days but I would have challenged anyone to find a copy in 1997. I remember paying about $50 back then. This was silly as "Second Edition" is exactly the same album and could have been had for $9 at any Best Buy at the time. I had to have that box.
- A Japanese version of the Flying Burrito Brothers' "Guilded Palace of Sin", which in addition to being one of the best albums ever recorded (IMO) was basically impossible to find in the US in the nineties. I paid a lot for it, I don't remember how much. This was a holy grail album for me back then, it's back in print now and available everywhere. Get it, if you haven't heard it.

I miss shopping for physical music, even if I don't miss the expense and inconvenience.

kahuna
04-29-16, 04:12 PM
It's still like that today around here. Best Buy will sell a CD for $14.99 that a local record shop is selling for 12.99. Locally owned record stores never charged anywhere near list price. I never paid $18.99 for a single CD in my life.

When CDs first came out in 1982, I was paying those $18.99 prices. I would wait for sales & those prices were usually $2-$3 cheaper. I think I ended up with about 2000 CDs.

I went from Vinyl, to 8-track, to Cassettes, & CDs.

DJariya
04-29-16, 04:21 PM
IIRC, Tower and The Warehouse's standard CD prices in the early 90's was around $13-14 and sale prices was $10-12.

Then mid-90's standard CD prices ballooned to $17-19 with sale prices being around $13-14 and that's when the shit hit the fan and music CD sales started a rapid decline.

For that time period, that was insanely expensive for music, especially trying to cater to college kids barely making minimum wage.


Going back to the film.....again watch it if you haven't seen it yet.

I'm glad that the film said Tower still has around 85 stores in Japan and is still successful. Russ Solomon can go to his grave knowing that his baby is still alive, except 6,000 miles away across the Pacific.

Chrisedge
04-29-16, 05:05 PM
^^ I don't remember CD pricing ever really going up that much. I always found sales and most of the CD's I bought (2000+) were all around $11-$13 bucks. I don't remember Non-Catalog Normal releases at $10...and when it did happen, it was simply a low priced first week kinda thing.

DJariya
04-29-16, 05:58 PM
^^ I don't remember CD pricing ever really going up that much. I always found sales and most of the CD's I bought (2000+) were all around $11-$13 bucks. I don't remember Non-Catalog Normal releases at $10...and when it did happen, it was simply a low priced first week kinda thing.

I don't know where you live, but in Southern California (where I live), where the cost of living is significantly higher, those were the prices that it jumped up to back then. When I was a Senior in College (around 1996), Tower's CD prices were around $13-14 on sale.

I traveled to New York City around 2004 when Virgin Megastore was still around and went into their NYC shop and CD prices back then were around $18.99 regular price.

Like the film said, Targets and Best Buys sold CDs at cost and that took a hit on much of Tower's clientele.

Why So Blu?
04-29-16, 07:25 PM
Just finished watching the documentary. It was pretty damn good but I agree with others that say that their pricing model sucked ass towards the end and they really didn't adapt to the advances in technology.

I used to shop there a lot for either hard to find out of print materials or laserdiscs. Music, too, and they had a ticketmaster kiosk in there, as well. Since it was a huge store (mine was the one in Pasadena that was right above The Good Guys electronic store) if I didn't have money I would just browse stuff for hours and think to myself that $18.98 - $22.98 for a new release is fucking absurd. Hell, depending on the title and how many they had in stock you'd pay a high price, as if the CD/VHS, etc., was out of print or something.

When Russ sold his interest to the Japanese - they fucking flourished and have more than 80 locations there. The Japanese adapted.

Ringmaster
04-29-16, 07:34 PM
Since it was a huge store (mine was the one in Pasadena that was right above The Good Guys electronic store)

I remember going to that Pasadena location a few times! My home store was in West Covina. A lot of good times and money well spent at that location. I remember after they closed it down, the building was home to a Halloween store for a couple of years until it was completely torn down and became a parking lot extension for the mall :sad:.

Why So Blu?
04-29-16, 07:41 PM
I remember going to that Pasadena location a few times! My home store was in West Covina. A lot of good times and money well spent at that location. I remember after they closed it down, the building was home to a Halloween store for a couple of years until it was completely torn down and become a parking lot extension for the mall :sad:.

My first laserdisc player was bought at The Good Guys there, walked it to the trunk of the car, and came back and bought my first laserdisc, which was Strange Days. I only ever made a couple of LD purchases there, because we also had the only laserdisc rental shop (The Laser Library) in the area and they would always cut us deals. Great shop that was maybe 1 mile from Tower.

davidh777
04-29-16, 07:47 PM
Tower Records at Pearl Kai Shopping Center use to be my hangout. Especially when I was going through my divorce. Also great prices when they started blowing out their stock of Laser Discs.
Also 100 feet away was Jelly's.

After reading this thread I thought this movie would be free on Prime but I guess it's not.


Tower Records - Midlife Crisis Hawaii
http://midlifecrisishawaii.com/do-you-remember/do-you-remember-tower-records

Tower Records Closes Hawaii Stores
http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/5826738/tower-records-closes-hawaii-stores

I would always hit the one by Ala Moana when I was on vacation.

When I lived in the Bay Area then moved to Seattle, I always spent time at Tower. When I studied abroad in London... also Tower. I liked it better than HMV and other places.

Obi-Wan Jabroni
04-29-16, 08:50 PM
That's funny. Those are the exact years I was at UofM. I spent countless hours in that store, rarely spending money. I'm sure we crossed paths at some point walking the aisles.

:thumbsup:

Alan Smithee
04-30-16, 10:44 PM
Regarding CD prices in general, when we got our first CD player in 1985 The Wherehouse of all places had ALL CDs priced at $11.99, every day. At Tower and the rest, $11.99 was the usual "sale price" equivalent to the $5.99-$6.99 that was the standard for LPs and cassettes. Sadly the Wherehouse's prices didn't last long. Usual everyday CD prices at Tower were $13.99-14.99, other stores were usually about a buck higher.

CD prices started going up when Garth Brooks' "The Chase" was released- it was about $16.99 for a standard-length album. (Usually only 2-record sets that could still fit on one CD were priced that high.) The usual "sale" price on that album was $13.99. The cassette was priced a bit higher than usual as well. Releases from the "big" artists like Steve Miller were priced the same, and that's when I pretty much stopped buying a ton of CDs every time I got a paycheck. Even some older albums (like the Beatles) had their prices raised. I was especially pissed since the music and stereo magazines had speculated that CD prices would go DOWN as they became cheaper to manufacture- while some older titles did get priced around $10, it was ridiculous that the newer ones had their prices increased and I would not go along with it.

Russ Solomon had said a big reason for the general decline in music sales was that labels didn't put out singles anymore. "Back in the day" you could buy a 45 for about 50 cents, in the 90s you could get CD singles for about $5 (usually with remixes and B-sides) but those eventually went away and you had to either buy the entire album or get just the songs you wanted via download. Singles were a good way to spend just a few bucks on an artist without committing to the whole album right away, and when I was big-time into collecting I'd buy both the albums AND singles from my favorite artists. Singles might be obsolete given how easy it is to hear a song online now, but I'd likely still buy them if they were still putting them out.

Since the Japanese stores were sold off to another company, I've always hoped they'd come back here and open some US stores, at least in California.

JOE29
04-30-16, 11:26 PM
So are there anymore online places to buy cd's except for Amazon left?

Damfino
05-01-16, 11:44 AM
So are there anymore online places to buy cd's except for Amazon left?

CD universe is still in business.

I still miss Tower records more than any of the other chains even though I found my share of titles at Wherehouse, Music Plus, and Licorice Pizza too.

My favorite memories of tower records was that they were open until midnight. This meant that as a pre-drinking age teenager it was a great place to hang out after a movie.

Why So Blu?
05-01-16, 12:53 PM
I used to visit The Warehouse and Sam Goody but towards the end there I didn't buy much music. I think one of the last DVDs I bought at a Warehouse local to my area was Rage Against the Machine's Battle of Mexico City. A few weeks/months later and the store closed.

CRM114
05-02-16, 02:59 PM
The big chain at Penn State when I was there (85-90) was National Record Mart (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Record_Mart). The name alone kept me a mile away. Chains blow but the only saving grace for me for Tower was selection. That would be worth paying chain store pricing. In college you could find me at City Lights or Arboria and then the "CD-only" store that opened up. I couldn't imagine buying shit in those glitzy chain stores.


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0