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CRM114
11-08-05, 06:36 PM
John McCain? Bolded for kvrdave.


CIA asks Justice Dept. to review prisons report (http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/11/08/prison.probe/index.html)

GOP leaders also ask probe of how newspaper got information

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The CIA has sent a report to the U.S. Justice Department indicating classified information may have been leaked to The Washington Post for its recent story about CIA secret prisons, according to U.S. officials.

The newspaper reported last week that the CIA was holding top suspected al Qaeda terrorists at undisclosed prisons in eastern Europe and other locations.

The Justice Department refused to confirm or deny a referral was made.

The action by the CIA general counsel was taken immediately after the Washington Post article was published, an official said.

It is similar to one taken when covert officer Valerie Plame's name was made public in an article written by a syndicated columnist.

By law, when there is the possibility that classified information has been leaked, the CIA is required to inform the Justice Department, which generally launches an investigation into the matter.

Earlier Tuesday, Republican congressional leaders asked for an investigation into the matter, and Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi suggested his own GOP colleagues could be to blame for the possible leak.

Sen. Bill Frist of Tennessee, the Senate majority leader, and Rep. Dennis Hastert of Illinois, the House speaker, asked the chairmen of the House and Senate intelligence committees to look into the report, saying the disclosure could damage national security.

"If accurate, such an egregious disclosure could have long-term and far-reaching damaging and dangerous consequences, and will imperil our efforts to protect the American people and our homeland from terrorist attacks," they wrote in a letter requesting the investigation.

Lott told reporters the information in the Post story was the same as that given to Republican senators in a closed-door briefing by Vice President Dick Cheney last week.

"Every word that was said in there went right to the newspaper," he said. "We can't keep our mouths shut."

Lott, a former Senate majority leader who was pushed out in 2002, suggested the information was passed along by a senator to a staff member.

He said the investigation Frist and Hastert want may result in an ethics probe of a Senate member.

Citing U.S. officials and those from other governments familiar with the arrangement, the Post reported Wednesday that top al Qaeda suspects were being held for questioning "at a Soviet-era compound in Eastern Europe" and other locations around the world.

Critics said the arrangement suggests U.S. agents are engaged in activities that would be illegal under American law.

Top U.S. officials would not confirm or deny the report, but insisted all prisoners are being treated humanely. President Bush said flatly Monday, "We do not torture."

A Washington Post spokesman said the paper had no comment on the possibility of an investigation.

The leak probe request was announced as top administration officials battled a Senate-approved measure that explicitly bars "cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment" of prisoners in U.S. custody.

The White House has threatened to veto a $440 billion Pentagon spending bill if it includes that measure, which is backed by Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona -- who as a prisoner of war during Vietnam was tortured by his North Vietnamese captors.

And it came a day after Democrats called for an independent investigation into the treatment of prisoners in American custody.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi urged GOP leaders to initiate a broader investigation -- one that would include the 2003 leak of Valerie Plame's identity and the faulty intelligence used to argue for the invasion of Iraq.

"There is plenty to investigate about the Bush administration's use and misuse of intelligence," the California Democrat said in a written statement. "The American people deserve the truth."

Democratic Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the Senate minority leader, told CNN the GOP announcement was "just for show."

And a senior Democratic aide called it a way for Republicans to divert attention from the grand jury probe into the exposure of Plame, whose husband had publicly challenged a key element of the Bush administration's case for war.

That disclosure led to the October 28 indictment of Lewis "Scooter" Libby, who resigned as Cheney chief of staff.

Libby was charged with obstruction of justice, perjury and making false statements to federal agents investigating who revealed Plame's identity to reporters.

CNN's David Ensor, Pam Benson, Ed Henry and Ted Barrett contributed to this report.

kvrdave
11-08-05, 06:39 PM
Thanks :)


And interesting.

mosquitobite
11-08-05, 07:06 PM
Trent Lott is still pissed about being pushed out of the leadership of the Senate.

That said, I wouldn't be sad to see McCain gone ;)

DVD Polizei
11-08-05, 07:21 PM
"If accurate, such an egregious disclosure could have long-term and far-reaching damaging and dangerous consequences, and will imperil our efforts to protect the American people and our homeland from terrorist attacks,"

Yeah, ok.

classicman2
11-08-05, 07:21 PM
The WH can't piss McCain off too much. He might not vote for the nuclear option.

Supermallet
11-08-05, 07:27 PM
I don't think the Republicans are too worried about having the use the nuclear option at this point.

classicman2
11-08-05, 07:47 PM
I don't think the Republicans are too worried about having the use the nuclear option at this point.

Worried? Probably not.

In the back of their mind? Yes.

mosquitobite
11-08-05, 07:54 PM
Nuclear option may stop filibusters but it won't stop Rule 21.

In order to use it though, the Dems will have to paint Alito as a baby eating, sexual harrassing, cave man and have the majority of Americans believe them.

Lest they lose even more seats in 2006...

CRM114
11-08-05, 09:47 PM
Nuclear option may stop filibusters but it won't stop Rule 21.

In order to use it though, the Dems will have to paint Alito as a baby eating, sexual harrassing, cave man and have the majority of Americans believe them.

Lest they lose even more seats in 2006...

OK, if we are going to derail the thread to 2006, then some latest polling is in order, right?


Poll: Issues Favor Dems in 2006 Elections
A Year Out from 2006 Vote, ABC News/Washington Post Issues Poll Suggests Opening for Change

Analysis by GARY LANGER
Nov. 6, 2005 - A year out from the 2006 midterm elections, the Democrats hold an extraordinary lead in voter preferences -- but far less of an advantage in the practical elements it can take to turn an out-party's hopes into votes: leadership, anti-incumbency and a unified theme.

Opportunity is there for the Democrats: Capitalizing on George W. Bush's troubles, the party has a 12-point advantage over the Republicans in trust to handle the nation's main problems, and it leads in nine of 10 individual issues, with some huge gains from three years ago. In the 10th -- Bush's trademark, handling terrorism -- the Democrats run even.


Sampling, data collection and tabulation for this poll were done by TNS.

Indeed, 55 percent of Americans in this ABC News/Washington Post poll say they'd like to see the Democrats take control of Congress in 2006. And if the election were today, registered voters would favor the Democrat in their congressional district by 52 percent to 37 percent.

That 15-point margin is numerically the biggest for the Democrats since an ABC/Post poll in September 1984 (they ultimately lost 14 seats), although about the same as a 14-point Democratic lead in one poll in 1996 (when they gained nine).

The Democrats' advantage on issues extends to some surprising areas -- Iraq and the economy, for example -- and show striking gains from late 2002.

Which Party Do You Trust to Handle...
Democrats Republicans
Economy 56% 34%
Social Security 56 29
Education 55 32
Health Care 54 29
Taxes 48 38
Iraq 48 37
Federal Budget 48 34
Gas Prices 47 26
Terrorism 42 42
Ethics 42 36

So does their edge in attributes: They hold a 10-point lead, 50 percent to 40 percent, as the party that "better represents your personal values."

Party Attributes
Democrats Republicans
Is more open to ideas of political moderates 60% 24%
Is more concerned with needs of people like you 56 33
Better represents your values 50 40
Has stronger leaders 35 51

But a year can be a millennium in political terms, and midterm elections are far more complicated than a single popularity contest. With incumbent re-election rates usually over 90 percent, it takes a nationalized congressional election -- with a differentiated, unifying theme and anti-incumbent sentiment -- to create real change. The template is the Republicans' realigning election of 1994, when they gained 52 House seats and the control they still enjoy today.

Those elements, thus far, are lacking for 2006. Sixty percent of Americans approve of the work their own representative is doing (compared with 49 percent in October 1994). Despite trailing virtually everywhere else, the Republicans hold a 16-point advantage, 51 percent to 35 percent, as the party that has stronger leaders. And Republicans are more unified behind their party's leadership than are Democrats behind theirs.

But perhaps the biggest challenge for the Democrats is differentiation: Even with their edge on issues, just 44 percent of Americans say the Democrats are offering the country a clear direction that's different from the Republicans. (And notably, just 38 percent of independents say so.) That suggests that the current state of play says more about Republican weaknesses than Democratic strengths.


Bush

While the Democrats struggle to find a compelling message, Republican candidates may seek distance from their president, complicating Bush's efforts to govern in the year ahead. By nearly a 2-1 margin, 34 percent to 18 percent, Americans say they're more likely to oppose than to support a candidate who's closely associated with Bush.

And independents -- the key swing voters -- say by a slightly wider margin, 37 percent to 12 percent, that they're more apt to oppose a candidate who's closely aligned with Bush.

That reflects Bush's current difficulties -- a career-low 39 percent job approval rating and weakness across issues and personal attributes -- brought on by difficulties in Iraq, the troubled Hurricane Katrina response, economic concerns and the ethics cloud over the White House.

Ethics, though, do not look like a Democratic advantage: Americans roughly divide on which party has a higher level of ethics and honesty -- 16 percent say the Democrats, 12 percent say the Republicans -- and the big majority, 71 percent, rate them the same.

There is also somewhat of a pox on both houses in public attitudes. Just 46 percent of Americans express confidence in the government's ability to get things done. Fifty-nine percent disapprove of the way Congress is doing its job, and 61 percent disapprove of the way the Republicans in Congress specifically are performing. But the Democrats, while better-rated, hardly have bragging rights: Fifty-four percent see their performance negatively as well.


Change

That said, the change in preferences between the parties on issues since they were last asked in an ABC/Post poll in late 2002 is vast. Then, the two parties were rated about evenly in trust to handle the economy; now the Democrats lead by 22 points, 56 percent to 34 percent. On Iraq, the Republicans led by 26 points; now the Democrats lead by 11. On terrorism, the Republicans led by 36 points; now the parties are even.

As strong as they currently are on issues, the Democrats two biggest leads are on attributes: By 33 points, 56 percent to 33 percent, they're seen as the party "more concerned with the needs of people like you." And they hold a 36-point advantage, 60 percent to 24 percent, as the party that's "more open to the ideas of people who are political moderates." The challenge for the Democrats in the next year is to consolidate that image advantage into actual votes across congressional districts.


Methodology

This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by telephone Oct. 30-Nov. 2, 2005, among a random national sample of 1,202 adults. The results have a three-point error margin. Sampling, data collection and tabulation by TNS Intersearch of Horsham, Pa.

Lord Rick
11-09-05, 12:09 PM
I'm sure Frist and Hastert will get to the bottom of this immediately.

:lol:

joeblow69
11-09-05, 12:16 PM
Critics said the arrangement suggests U.S. agents are engaged in activities that would be illegal under American law.
Does anyone seemed at all concerned about this part?

Is there a loophole for leaking classified information if that info proves that the US is doing something illegally? (Some kind of whistleblower statute or something?)


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