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How come theatrical movies produced in DTS don't always come out on DVD that way? [Archive] - DVD Talk Forum

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OldBoy
11-12-04, 02:06 PM
And why are so few DVD's produced without DTS when I think it is a superior sound to Dolby Digital 5.1 (no offense)? I know it takes more amount of disc space, but so what, so many times DTS is a high selling point as opposed to some other special features. Doesn't DTS rank as high on the list of most wanted special features? I don't think it could cost too much more to even put out a double disc if the first is sequestered just for the movie.

Anyone...

Green Jello
11-12-04, 02:13 PM
Scott, the search feature is your friend. I doubt anyone here has the energy to have this discussion for the 500th time.

...and you're a Special Edition member :rolleyes:

matome
11-12-04, 02:30 PM
Quick answer: DTS needs a lot more space than DD especially at full bitrate. Also, a good percentage of people out there probably don't have the (relatively) newer equipment to play DTS streams, while DD is pretty much standard.

Joe Molotov
11-12-04, 02:46 PM
I also seem to remember hear some 15 dozen times DTS in theaters isn't the same as DTS for home theaters. ;)

darkside
11-12-04, 02:49 PM
Originally posted by Joe Molotov
I also seem to remember hear some 15 dozen times DTS in theaters isn't the same as DTS for home theaters. ;)

That is your answer. The sound used in theaters whether it be Dolby or DTS is completely different.

DonnachaOne
11-12-04, 02:49 PM
Green, it's hard to search for "dts". Even "dts*".

Scott, dts isn't actually much of a selling point for your average Wal-mart shoopper. A lot of people don't notice much of a difference. dts on most DVDs is half-bitrate and usually just sounds like the dd track with a little more clarity and some new minor subtleties; don't get me wrong, there are a lot of exceptions. However, at this point I won't buy a version of a DVD just because it's the dts version; I'll wait for a review first.

sn9ke_eyes
11-12-04, 02:50 PM
Originally posted by Joe Molotov
I also seem to remember hear some 15 dozen times DTS in theaters isn't the same as DTS for home theaters. ;)

what he said

Green Jello
11-12-04, 04:39 PM
Ok, since DonnachaOne is right about the search thing, I'll throw in my $.02 (again)

Originally posted by scott1598
it is a superior sound to Dolby Digital 5.1 (no offense)?

While I agree that it is, a very small portion of the public has the equipment to play it, and further more has quality equipment where you can notice the difference.

Originally posted by scott1598
I know it takes more amount of disc space, but so what, so many times DTS is a high selling point as opposed to some other special features. Doesn't DTS rank as high on the list of most wanted special features?

For reasons listed above, you are wrong here. The vast majority of the DVD consumers couldn't care less about DTS, or even know what it is. So when DVD producers are weighing the special features, and video quality, DTS will often get left behind.

Originally posted by scott1598
I don't think it could cost too much more to even put out a double disc if the first is sequestered just for the movie.

That is the mindset of CTS with their Superbit Deluxe discs. While I agree that this is the best way to produce a DVD, you are wrong that it doesn't cost much more. Sure the per disc cost isn't great, but when you multiply that by millions of discs produced, it really adds up.



Anyway, this argument will someday be a thing of the past as soon as the HD-DVD formats take over. They have the space available and have been mandated to all carry both formats, and can even accommodate their higher resolutions and bit rates.

OldBoy
11-12-04, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Green Jello
Ok, since DonnachaOne is right about the search thing, I'll throw in my $.02 (again)



While I agree that it is, a very small portion of the public has the equipment to play it, and further more has quality equipment where you can notice the difference.



For reasons listed above, you are wrong here. The vast majority of the DVD consumers couldn't care less about DTS, or even know what it is. So when DVD producers are weighing the special features, and video quality, DTS will often get left behind.



That is the mindset of CTS with their Superbit Deluxe discs. While I agree that this is the best way to produce a DVD, you are wrong that it doesn't cost much more. Sure the per disc cost isn't great, but when you multiply that by millions of discs produced, it really adds up.



Anyway, this argument will someday be a thing of the past as soon as the HD-DVD formats take over. They have the space available and have been mandated to all carry both formats, and can even accommodate their higher resolutions and bit rates.

well, if you say the average consumer (Walmart shopper) couldn't care less about DTS or even have the equipment to utilize DTS, why would they care about something as superior as HD-DVD, much less buy the equipment for that as well??

Green Jello
11-12-04, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by scott1598
well, if you say the average consumer (Walmart shopper) couldn't care less about DTS or even have the equipment to utilize DTS, why would they care about something as superior as HD-DVD, much less buy the equipment for that as well??

In the early days of the format, they won't. At first it will only exist in the high-end of home theater consumers. Then after a while, the pricing will come down and non HD DVD equipment will disappear all together.

DrGerbil
11-12-04, 05:18 PM
Originally posted by Green Jello
Then after a while, the pricing will come down and non HD DVD equipment will disappear all together.
You mean like VCRs? Because I still see them for sale...

Green Jello
11-12-04, 05:21 PM
Originally posted by DrGerbil
You mean like VCRs? Because I still see them for sale...

That's not the same thing. HD-DVD players will play the old non-HD discs. Once the HD units are cheap enough, there is no reason to have both.

Drexl
11-12-04, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by Green Jello
Anyway, this argument will someday be a thing of the past as soon as the HD-DVD formats take over. They have the space available and have been mandated to all carry both formats, and can even accommodate their higher resolutions and bit rates.

No, they are not required to carry DTS. The players have to be able to pass a DTS bitstream, but that doesn't mean that every disc will have DTS. I hope that if they do have enough space, they will often include it, but that remains to be seen.

Heck, why don't DVDs have SDDS? Lots of movies had it in the theater! ;)

JoeyOhhhh
11-12-04, 05:58 PM
Isn't DTS the standard for either Blu-Ray or HD-DVD?

Green Jello
11-12-04, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by JoeyOhhhh
Isn't DTS the standard for either Blu-Ray or HD-DVD?

Both. That was one of my points above.

Josh Z
11-12-04, 07:20 PM
Originally posted by Drexl
No, they are not required to carry DTS. The players have to be able to pass a DTS bitstream, but that doesn't mean that every disc will have DTS.

There's a lot of conflicting information on this point. What you state is the way I interpreted the press release as well, however DTS is insistent that their sound format will be mandatory on every HD-DVD and Blu-Ray disc.

fitprod
11-12-04, 08:06 PM
There's a lot of conflicting information on this point. What you state is the way I interpreted the press release as well, however DTS is insistent that their sound format will be mandatory on every HD-DVD and Blu-Ray disc.

Is that on first or second generation players? They'll probably be working on thier codec or something when the first generation units arrive, just like DVD. ;-)

fitprod

DVD Josh
11-12-04, 11:23 PM
I'm surprised no one said this yet, but I've always thought that the answer was that they came with DTS and DD to be compatible with whatever setup the individual theater was using.

cultshock
11-12-04, 11:35 PM
Heck, why don't DVDs have SDDS? Lots of movies had it in the theater! ;)

You'd need a damn big home theatre to make practical use of two front left and two front right speakers. :lol: ;) (but I wish I had a home theatre that big :drool: )


I'm surprised no one said this yet, but I've always thought that the answer was that they came with DTS and DD to be compatible with whatever setup the individual theater was using.


One of my local theatres uses DTS around 50% of the time, while the other two never do (they obviously don't have a DTS setup). And SDDS? Forget it, not in my neighbourhood.


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