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das Monkey
10-07-04, 10:14 AM
Let's clarify. I'm not talking remakes where you thought the original and remake were decent, or you saw the remake and thought it was good and then saw the original and also thought it was good. I'm talking about a film that you loved for many years, likely owned it, watched it many times, and then they remade it ... and you loved the remake.

For many reasons -- personal nostalgia, Hollywood idiocy, etc -- I think this is a relatively rare occurrence.

Recent discussion on the upcoming sequel got me thinking about this, and the only one I can think of at this time is <b>Ocean's Eleven</b>. I had loved this film for so many years, and when they announced the remake I was pissed. Not only did I expect it to suck, but I had enjoyed the relative mainstream obscurity of the film and didn't look forward to all the new (often younger) viewers watching it after seeing the remake and telling me it wasn't any good. Well, the latter certainly happened, but to my surprise, the former did not. As more details were released about the film it sounded more and more promising, then the ad campaign was good, and ultimately the film captured the essence of the original without repeating it. It was a great accomplishment, a pleasant surprise, and I now find myself with two films that I love (although the original will always be my favorite*).

Typically, I find most remakes to be unnecessary at best and at worst? Well, let's not talk about <b>Planet of the Apes</b>. So it seems to me a very uncommon thing to love an original and then end up loving the remake as well, so share what films you had a similar reaction to.

das

* I recognize this is a minority opinion

Note: I searched on "remake*" and "reimagin*" but if I missed a similar thread, just point me there.

Groucho
10-07-04, 10:25 AM
Dawn of the Dead. It helped that the remake was very loose, the only commonality was the mall and the zombies.

I liked Purple Noon and The Talented Mr. Ripley equally. Again, there are a lot of differences between them.

Hitchcock's remake of The Man who Knew Too Much is superior, although I enjoy the original quite a bit. In this case, the films are very similiar, sometimes shot-for-shot.

NaturalMystic79
10-07-04, 10:35 AM
Cape Fear
Texas Chainsaw Massacre

marty888
10-07-04, 11:29 AM
<b>Invasion of the Body Snatchers</b> and <b>The Fly</b> - loved both remakes, still love the originals.

<b>A Star Is Born</b> is vintage Garland with an outstanding score, and I still enjoy the Janet Gaynor version as well.

chente
10-07-04, 12:18 PM
Sabrina

Groucho
10-07-04, 12:28 PM
Thought of another one. Again, the two films are very different making it easy to enjoy both: The Thing.

I enjoy both the Japanese and American versions of The Ring as well.

Crocker Jarmen
10-07-04, 12:30 PM
12 Angry Men and Inherite the Wind are tow favorites of mine, I've seen them many times.

I was amazed by how much I liked the late 1990 remakes, both featuring Jack Lemmon and George C. Scott.

ITW is the better of the two (both remakes and originals). Jack Lemmon is a great stand in for Spencer Tracy.

scott shelton
10-07-04, 12:33 PM
THE FLY is a good choice.

I did love the two PSYCHOs, which isn't a popular opinion, I know...

flixtime
10-07-04, 12:34 PM
The Last of the Mohicans (1992) was a terrific remake of the 1936 Randolph Scott version which is also a favorite of mine.

Errol Flynn's Adventures of Robin Hood has long been a favorite. I really enjoyed Costner's version too.

Ditto Banderas in The Mask of Zorro. Loved it even more than another favorite version with Tyrone Power. Heck, though I only saw it recently Douglas Fairbanks' silent version is great too!

Also The Bounty with Gibson/Hopkins is pretty good. I'm also a big fan of the 1935 Gable/Laughton version as well as the '62 Brando/Howard version. It's been 20 years so I'd be open to even one more go round with this tale.

I know I'm forgetting some others.

Geofferson
10-07-04, 01:06 PM
The Thing - loved the first version for the longest time and saw the remake with little expectations and was equally impressed

Invasion of the Body Snatchers - (see above)

Gaslight - For the lonest time, I had only seen the US version. When I finally saw the original British version, I was simply spellbound.

Zodiac_Speaking
10-07-04, 01:18 PM
The Thing, Cape Fear, and Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

devilshalo
10-07-04, 01:26 PM
The Blob/Beware the Blob

King Kong

FantasticVSDoom
10-07-04, 01:54 PM
Originally posted by das Monkey
Let's clarify. I'm not talking remakes where you thought the original and remake were decent, or you saw the remake and thought it was good and then saw the original and also thought it was good. I'm talking about a film that you loved for many years, likely owned it, watched it many times, and then they remade it ... and you loved the remake.

For many reasons -- personal nostalgia, Hollywood idiocy, etc -- I think this is a relatively rare occurrence.

Recent discussion on the upcoming sequel got me thinking about this, and the only one I can think of at this time is <b>Ocean's Eleven</b>. I had loved this film for so many years, and when they announced the remake I was pissed. Not only did I expect it to suck, but I had enjoyed the relative mainstream obscurity of the film and didn't look forward to all the new (often younger) viewers watching it after seeing the remake and telling me it wasn't any good. Well, the latter certainly happened, but to my surprise, the former did not. As more details were released about the film it sounded more and more promising, then the ad campaign was good, and ultimately the film captured the essence of the original without repeating it. It was a great accomplishment, a pleasant surprise, and I now find myself with two films that I love (although the original will always be my favorite*).

Typically, I find most remakes to be unnecessary at best and at worst? Well, let's not talk about <b>Planet of the Apes</b>. So it seems to me a very uncommon thing to love an original and then end up loving the remake as well, so share what films you had a similar reaction to.

das


Reading the title of this thread, Ocean's 11 was the first movie I thought of as well...The first one had a real good style and appeal to me, and I thought the 2nd one did well where most movies fail in duplicating that feel for a newer aduience and time period. And I had my doubts because I never really cared for Clooney, and I didnt think in anyway he would be able to fill Sinatra's role, but I think he did a pretty good job in it.

William Fuld
10-07-04, 02:18 PM
The Ladykillers
Psycho

Mountain Biker
10-08-04, 01:29 AM
The Thing
Dawn of the Dead
Night of the Living Dead
The Fly

mookyman
10-08-04, 11:11 AM
The Thing
Dawn of the Dead
Cape Fear
The Ring
The Texas Chainsaw Massacre
The Fly
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (78)
Nosferatu

tommyp007
10-08-04, 11:19 AM
another vote for 12 Angry Men

Groucho
10-08-04, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by mookyman
Nosferatu Good choice! I actually prefer the remake, which puts me in a minority of 1 (even Herzog prefers the original).

asianxcore
10-08-04, 11:28 AM
Night of the Living Dead

Savini did an amazing job with the remake.

also:
The Thing

eiker_ir
10-08-04, 11:33 AM
Night of the Living '90, i like it even more than the original

Tarantino
10-08-04, 11:53 AM
I liked both of versions of The Getaway (1972, 1994).

I also liked both versions of Insomnia.

Hokeyboy
10-08-04, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by flixtime
The Last of the Mohicans (1992) was a terrific remake of the 1936 Randolph Scott version which is also a favorite of mine.

Errol Flynn's Adventures of Robin Hood has long been a favorite. I really enjoyed Costner's version too.

Ditto Banderas in The Mask of Zorro. Loved it even more than another favorite version with Tyrone Power. Heck, though I only saw it recently Douglas Fairbanks' silent version is great too!

None of these can really be considered remakes. Last of the Mohicans is an adaptation of a novel, not a remake of the earlier movie. It would be like saying the TV miniseries version of The Shining is a remake of Kubrick's film. Or that Damon's Bourne Identity is a remake of Chamberlain's.

Costner's Robin Hood is a take on a British legend, not a remake of Flynn's movie (where's Sir Guy and Prince John?). The same with Banderas's Zorro -- he isn't even Don Diego, but an all new dude. And I don't think we could call the upcoming Batman Begins a remake of Burton's or Schumacher's films, or Bryan Singer's upcoming Superman film a remake of Donner/Reeve's.

That having been said, the one I look forward to most is Jackson's King Kong. Also, groin.

woofman
10-08-04, 11:55 AM
Red Dragon

Timber
10-08-04, 12:08 PM
I'm going to 3rd Psycho. I love the original and I'm also quite a big fan for the remake. Not very well liked by most but liked by me non the less.

Hokeyboy
10-08-04, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by Timber
Not very well liked by most but liked by me non the less. I doubt that you would find many who'd be a gree a bull.

Ky-Fi
10-08-04, 12:36 PM
I can go with 2 great remakes---

I loved the 1931 Dracula, as well as Hammer's 1958 version of the story, and Coppola's 1992 version.

sundog
10-08-04, 01:10 PM
Both films based on the novel by Pierre Lou s:

The Devil is a Woman (1935), directed by Josef Von Sternberg

That Obscure Object of Desire (1977), directed by Luis Bu˝uel

flixtime
10-08-04, 01:22 PM
Originally posted by Matt Millheiser
None of these can really be considered remakes. Last of the Mohicans is an adaptation of a novel, not a remake of the earlier movie. It would be like saying the TV miniseries version of The Shining is a remake of Kubrick's film. Or that Damon's Bourne Identity is a remake of Chamberlain's.

Costner's Robin Hood is a take on a British legend, not a remake of Flynn's movie (where's Sir Guy and Prince John?). The same with Banderas's Zorro -- he isn't even Don Diego, but an all new dude. And I don't think we could call the upcoming Batman Begins a remake of Burton's or Schumacher's films, or Bryan Singer's upcoming Superman film a remake of Donner/Reeve's.

That having been said, the one I look forward to most is Jackson's King Kong. Also, groin.

I'll concede to a certain degree your points regarding Robin Hood and Zorro, however I'd submit "Last of the Mohicans" is more a remake than not. The writing credits on IMDb.com even credit the screenplay and writers for the 1936 version (Cooper's novel is naturally cited as well). I recall that Director Michael Mann also gave significant credit to the 1936 version. I recall little about the book but I'm fairly confident an analysis of the book and two films would show a greater similarity between the two films than the similarities between the new version of the film and the book.

Another example I might put forth is the trio of films "Yojimbo", "A Fistful of Dollars" and "Last Man Standing". The latter two films would be considered remakes (with a change in setting) of "Yojimbo". Both credit Kurosawa in the writing credits. "Yojimbo" though not officially credited as far as I can tell, is an adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's classic American crime novel "Red Harvest" (to which the film "Miller's Crossing" by the way also owes a great deal). It seems to me that most people - myself included - consider "A Fistful of Dollars" as a remake of "Yojimbo" and not an adaptation of Hammet's novel.

To a lesser degree perhaps, I'd also give significant consideration to Costner's "Robin Hood" as a remake (albeit modernized). I recently watched Douglas Fairbanks' version and it is clear the Flynn's version is significantly based on the Fairbanks' version. Not as clear perhaps between the Flynn and Costner version but I do recall plenty of mention by Costner (audiences now won't go for me wearing green tights, etc.) of the Flynn version so they certainly gave some thought to Flynn's version in making the newer one.

Anyhow, this discussion might make for a good discussion in its own thread. Take for example the earlier mentioned film "Red Dragon". Is the new film more a remake of "Manhunter" or more an adaptation of the Thomas Harris novel. What about various incarnations of Dracula, Frankenstein, and many more. What do you folks (I use the term "folks" in its standard usage and not as per President Bush's recent debate usage of the term), anyway, what do you think, do newer film "remakes" owe more to previous film incarnations or the original novels/stories (if that is the case)? Perhaps it is a case-by-case debate.

Posts like this one make me wish DVDTalk used "word count" instead of "post count" in determining status. I would certainly have reached "DVDTalk Ultimate Platinum Go Red Sox Edition" by now. At my rate of posting I'll be only a "Senior Member" forever.

SunMonkey
10-08-04, 01:43 PM
Another vote for Dawn of the Dead.

Perkinsun Dzees
10-08-04, 01:44 PM
THE SEVEN SAMURAI and THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN

Cornholio
10-08-04, 07:27 PM
texas chainsaw massacre

Rival11
10-08-04, 08:12 PM
The Thing
Cape Fear
Dawn of the Dead
The Fly

shaggy
10-09-04, 12:39 AM
Another vote for Dawn of the Dead and Texas Chainsaw


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