Release List Reviews Shop Join News DVD Giveaways Video Games Advertise
DVD Reviews | Theatrical Reviews | Adult DVD Reviews | Video Game Reviews | Price Search Buy Stuff Here
DVD Talk
DVD Reviews DVD Talk Headlines HD Reviews


Add to My Yahoo! - RSS 2.0 - RSS 2.0 - DVD Talk Podcast RSS -


Go Back   DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Tech Talk

Tech Talk Discuss PC Hardware, Software, Internet and Other Technology

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-06-04, 05:58 AM   #1
movieking
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 13,446
Bill imposes hefty 'spyware' fines

Not a tech question, but definitely of interest to the Tech folks.

I wonder if this would really make a difference. I really hope so.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Companies and others that secretly install "spyware" programs on people's computers to quietly monitor their Internet activities would face hefty federal fines under a bill the House passed Tuesday.

The most egregious behaviors ascribed to the category of such software -- secretly recording a person's computer keystrokes or mouse clicks -- are already illegal under U.S. wiretap and consumer protection laws.

The House proposal, known as the "Spy Act," adds civil penalties over what has emerged as an extraordinary frustration for Internet users, whose infected computers often turn sluggish and perform unexpectedly.

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Mary Bono, R-California, provides guidelines for technology companies that distribute software capable of most types of electronic monitoring. It requires that consumers explicitly choose to install such software and agree to the information being collected.

The House voted 399-1 to approve the bill. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, who often votes against spending measures, cast the lone dissenting vote Tuesday.

The House separately was expected to approve another anti-spyware bill as early as Wednesday. That bill, sponsored by Rep. Robert Goodlatte, R-Virginia, provides for additional criminal penalties.

The chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, said Goodlatte's anti-spyware bill was preferable because of its criminal sanctions, and Barton said he will work to combine both proposals for a final vote by year's end.

Barton acknowledged that experts had recently found more than 60 varieties of spyware installed on the panel's own computers. He said all the spyware programs had been installed without the permission of computer users.

The committee's ranking Democrat, Rep. Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, called the proposal approved Tuesday "a bill whose time has come."

"People are increasingly finding their home pages have been changed or their computers are sluggish," she said. "Their computers are no longer their own, and they can't figure out why."

The House bill approved Tuesday explicitly permits snooping software built by the FBI or spy agencies secretly collecting information under a court order or other legal permissions affecting federal departments.

The bill's bans against spyware would begin 12 months after it becomes law and would automatically expire after 2009.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-04, 08:54 AM   #2
Draven
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Rosemount, MN
Posts: 17,642
Good.

It should be illegal to install something on your computer that you don't know about, period.

That being said, a lot of people click a "yes" box at some point to get that stuff installed. It's going to take more responsibility from the user as well.
__________________
XBL GamerTag: Draven Sinclair
PSN: DravenSinclair
Game Center: Draven-X
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-04, 10:07 AM   #3
Ranger
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 19,060
Nobody likes spyware. But I've always grouped it along with the same annoyances that excessive pop-ups give. Some companies do it for money, most of the time, it's free software or free web service (porn?) anyway. Real software makers aren't going to load spyware on their products. I am writing this off as a feel good bill passed by Congressmen that don't have an understanding of the subject. The government shouldn't have to do every damn thing for the people that are too lazy or stupid to handle it themselves.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:21 PM   #4
bfrank
Premium Member
 
bfrank's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: So. Cal
Posts: 20,613
Bill Imposes Prison Time Over 'Spyware'

WASHINGTON - The House on Thursday passed the second bill in three days that would outlaw "spyware," irritating software that quietly monitors the activities of Internet users.



It would add penalties of up to five years in prison for people convicted of installing such programs without a computer user's permission.


The bill, known as the "Internet Spyware Prevention Act," passed 415-0. It would give the Justice Department (news - web sites) $10 million to crack down on companies and others that secretly install spyware and those who attempt to trick victims into disclosing personal details and financial information in e-mail scams popularly known as "phishing."


The bill's sponsor, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (news, bio, voting record), R-Va., said such problems were growing and serious. Offenders under his bill would be sentenced for up to five years for secretly installing spyware to break into someone's computer and commiting another federal crime.


Anyone caught installing spyware to change a computer's security settings or steal a victim's personal information ó such as an e-mail address, telephone number or bank account number ó could be sentenced up to two years in prison.


Rep. Zoe Lofgren (news, bio, voting record), D-Calif., said spyware was "quickly becoming one of the biggest threats to consumers on the Internet." She cited estimates that up to 90 percent of computers contain some forms of spyware. Lofgren said her daughter was recently victimized by electronic thieves in a phishing scam, persuading her in a forged e-mail to disclose personal information.


"Her thumb hit the send button and she thought, 'Oh, my goodness, what have I done!' We had to call and cancel all the credit cards and the like," Lofgren said. "This is something that preys upon people."


The House on Tuesday voted 399-1 to pass the "Spy Act," sponsored by Rep. Mary Bono (news, bio, voting record), R-Calif., which would add hefty civil penalties over the use of spyware.


Lawmakers were widely expected to combine both proposals for a final vote by year's end.




http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmp...ternet_spyware
__________________
B

Be good humans!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:24 PM   #5
kvrdave
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 81,649
Sounds good to me, but $10 million probably doesn't do much to actually fight it. Though I would bet that as irritated as nerds get with this stuff, probably most of the work will be done for them.
__________________
Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baronís cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C.S. Lewis
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:26 PM   #6
Ranger
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 19,060
http://www.dvdtalk.com/forum/showthr...hreadid=389269
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:26 PM   #7
jfoobar
DVD Talk Hero
 
jfoobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 32,759
Re: Bill Imposes Prison Time Over 'Spyware'

Quote:
Originally posted by bfrank
Offenders under his bill would be sentenced for up to five years for secretly installing spyware to break into someone's computer and commiting another federal crime.

Anyone caught installing spyware to change a computer's security settings or steal a victim's personal information ó such as an e-mail address, telephone number or bank account number ó could be sentenced up to two years in prison.
These circumstances to not apply to many of the applications currently classified as "spyware."
__________________
If you canít say something nice, donít say something nice.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:34 PM   #8
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
I get more pissed off at browser hijackers than spyware. These fucking things are tough to remove, and usually involves registry editing, DLL file manipulation, etc.

I'm pretty computer savvy and I've had a couple hijacks that I've fixed for friends that took me about 90 minutes to solve.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:44 PM   #9
DVD Polizei
DVD Talk Hero
 
DVD Polizei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Doucheville, OR
Posts: 39,473
Ewwwww, I'm scared. Shakin' in mah boots. Poeple get less time for beating a man within an inch of his life.

Cyber Crime Pays.
__________________
Blu-ray Titles: ~546 | HD DVD Titles: ~323

"I don't sell airplane parts. I've never sold airplane parts."
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:45 PM   #10
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
I get more pissed off at browser hijackers. Those things take some serious effort to fully remove. Usually involve registry editing and DLL manipulation.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:48 PM   #11
QuAcKeR
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: the ATL
Posts: 1,253
Re: Bill Imposes Prison Time Over 'Spyware'

That's all fine and dandy... but what does this part of the article have to do with spyware?

Quote:
Originally posted by bfrank
Lofgren said her daughter was recently victimized by electronic thieves in a phishing scam, persuading her in a forged e-mail to disclose personal information.


"Her thumb hit the send button and she thought, 'Oh, my goodness, what have I done!' We had to call and cancel all the credit cards and the like," Lofgren said. "This is something that preys upon people."
__________________
My 5 DVD directorial debut,
Click for some trailer action...

----
"I don't feel like really watching DVDs" -Geoffrey Kleinman
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:52 PM   #12
AGuyNamedMike
DVD Talk Legend
 
AGuyNamedMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska!
Posts: 13,746
Fines? Minor jail terms? Meh. Until SWAT teams start kicking in doors, MP5s blazing, I don't see an end to the problem.
__________________
Groucho - What if, like, we were all living in a mouse neuron man, and what if some mouse neuron in our universe had a universe it. Whoa.

Dr Mabuse - You mock, but Sutherland got some fine young stuff off that kind of thing so don't sell it short.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 12:55 PM   #13
68ShelbyGT500KR
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 2,710
Quote:
Originally posted by El Scorcho
I get more pissed off at browser hijackers than spyware. These fucking things are tough to remove, and usually involves registry editing, DLL file manipulation, etc.

I'm pretty computer savvy and I've had a couple hijacks that I've fixed for friends that took me about 90 minutes to solve.
What prevenative measures have you suggested to your friends after you removed the parasites?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 01:52 PM   #14
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
Quote:
Originally posted by 68ShelbyGT500KR
What prevenative measures have you suggested to your friends after you removed the parasites?
Stop clicking on every fucking link and popup and "click yes!" box they come across.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 01:55 PM   #15
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
Shoulda seen the hijack I had to deal with the other night.

It stored a DLL in the System32 folder that automatically regenerated the registry values that were pointing the browser (upon startup and during use) to various fields that loaded the search engine. Even after removing the registry entries, it'd put them right back upon opening a new browser. Had to do a ton of research and load some freeware that told me which .DLLs were currently in use. Then I found one that was oddly named and renamed the .DLL and the problem went away for good.

Took about 90 minutes, as I had a bitch of a time figuring out where the regeneration was coming from.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 01:58 PM   #16
sfsdfd
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: |-|@><0r L@n|)
Posts: 17,214
Y'know, when you write "bill" in Tech Talk, I don't think "bill," I think "Bill."

- David Stein
__________________
"The Other is not a peaceful community. We are bitches." -kvrdave

Ask not what your country can do for you... because the answer is disappointing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 02:02 PM   #17
68ShelbyGT500KR
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 2,710
Quote:
Originally posted by El Scorcho
Shoulda seen the hijack I had to deal with the other night.

It stored a DLL in the System32 folder that automatically regenerated the registry values that were pointing the browser (upon startup and during use) to various fields that loaded the search engine. Even after removing the registry entries, it'd put them right back upon opening a new browser. Had to do a ton of research and load some freeware that told me which .DLLs were currently in use. Then I found one that was oddly named and renamed the .DLL and the problem went away for good.

Took about 90 minutes, as I had a bitch of a time figuring out where the regeneration was coming from.
Did that happen to be an 020 entry(AppInit_DLL) in the HJT log? Those are the toughest if seen because the dll is random and there is another that is hidden.

Just curious
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 02:06 PM   #18
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
Quote:
Originally posted by 68ShelbyGT500KR
Did that happen to be an 020 entry(AppInit_DLL) in the HJT log? Those are the toughest if seen because the dll is random and there is another that is hidden.

Just curious
Yep.

I got lucky when I found the .DLL though. I just looked for one that looked completely out of place and random and thankfully it was the right one. Sometimes even legit software have .DLLs that make absolutely no sense if you look at the filename.

It was the ever-increasing about:blank browser hijack thats been making its way around, apparently.

It also stores sp.html in your Windows/Local Users/.../Temp folder too.

And because it's constantly running, you have to enter into Windows Safe Mode to get rid of it. Trying to delete these files normally results in a no go because it's currently running as part of a process.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 02:06 PM   #19
68ShelbyGT500KR
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 2,710
Quote:
Originally posted by El Scorcho
Stop clicking on every fucking link and popup and "click yes!" box they come across.
If a popup comes up, it is "safer" to click on the "X" instead of the answer such as Yes, no etc...

You may want to suggest,SpywareBlaster, SpywareGuard, a Hosts file and maybe NOT Internet Explorer. I know that weening off IE is easier said than done.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 02:07 PM   #20
El Scorcho
DVD Talk Hero
 
El Scorcho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 39,619
These people were computer novices and of the older inexperienced crowd. Getting them to do this or do that with any consistency is actually more difficult than removing some spyware or a hijack every now and then.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-04, 02:07 PM   #21
68ShelbyGT500KR
DVD Talk Gold Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Houston, Tx.
Posts: 2,710
Quote:
Originally posted by El Scorcho
Yep.

I got lucky when I found the .DLL though. I just looked for one that looked completely out of place and random and thankfully it was the right one. Sometimes even legit software have .DLLs that make absolutely no sense if you look at the filename.

It was the ever-increasing about:blank browser hijack thats been making its way around, apparently.

It also stores sp.html in your Windows/Local Users/.../Temp folder too.

And because it's constantly running, you have to enter into Windows Safe Mode to get rid of it. Trying to delete these files normally results in a no go because it's currently running as part of a process.
Yep, That, to me is the Big Daddy" of all the parasites!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-04, 02:52 AM   #22
namja
Stealth Moderator
 
namja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: High Definition
Posts: 24,878
Quote:
Originally posted by sfsdfd
Y'know, when you write "bill" in Tech Talk, I don't think "bill," I think "Bill."
Yeah, first thing I thought too and wondered how he was going to enforce that ...
__________________

life in high definition
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:24 PM.

Rules - DVD Talk - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2011 DVDTalk.com All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.