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Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

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Old 02-22-14, 01:37 AM   #51
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by duff beer View Post


So this guy actually existed.
You should watch the satire piece "Walker" directed by Alex Cox starring Ed Harris. It's a great flick and Criterion put out the DVD.

Very subversive pic.
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Old 02-23-14, 08:39 PM   #52
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Maduro may try to prevent people from leaving the country.

This does not surprise me.

Back in 2003, when I first read that Chavez had put price caps on food, and then later on various other items, I expected this to lead to shortages (which came true), and then government seizures of farm, supermarkets, and other sectors of the economy (which also came true) and then, ultimately a dictatorship (which seems to be in the process of coming true).

Maduro is no different than Chavez, and if Chavez were alive today, I'm certain he would support Maduro's use of the military to seize a toilet paper factory.

In the Communist Manifesto, Marx defined communism as "...the theory of the Communists may be summed up in the single sentence: Abolition of private property."

I'm not disputing Marx's definition.

However, in the real world as it exists today, as well as how it existed in every country that had it in the 20th century, I would define communism as a system where the government controls the distribution of toilet paper.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...est-grows.html

Venezuela to slap arrested protestors with passport ban as unrest grows


http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/21/wo...per/index.html

Facing shortages, Venezuela takes over toilet paper factory
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Old 02-23-14, 08:49 PM   #53
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Amazing how someone who consistently misunderstands everything he reads can be so prescient about world affairs.
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Old 02-23-14, 09:40 PM   #54
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Due to Venezuela's forced economy with lack of any stimulation, I kinda don't see any other option but more dictatorships and eventual recycling of events of history in that country. The more protesting resistance...the more violent and secretive the government will be. Definitely not a happy ending.
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Old 02-24-14, 08:18 AM   #55
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
You keep insinuating and dodging. Let's make this simple:

1. Do you believe that the US government has anything to do with the current unrest in Venezuela?
2. Do you believe that the Chavez/Maduro government is defensible or has been good for Venezuela?
1. I have no idea.
2. Its none of my business.
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Old 02-24-14, 01:37 PM   #56
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by grundle View Post
Facing shortages, Venezuela takes over toilet paper factory
Make protesters shit their pants!
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Old 02-24-14, 01:45 PM   #57
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

grundle, you are so outraged by what goes on politically in another sovereign nation, you should call for the US oil companies to stop buying Venezuelan oil.
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Old 02-26-14, 08:05 PM   #58
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supermallet View Post
Amazing how someone who consistently misunderstands everything he reads can be so prescient about world affairs.

Since you think I am wrong, please explain what those articles really mean.


.



Quote:
Originally Posted by CRM114 View Post
grundle, you are so outraged by what goes on politically in another sovereign nation, you should call for the US oil companies to stop buying Venezuelan oil.

No. I think such a boycott would hurt the Venezuelan people.


.

In this excellent 14 minute speech, Marco Rubio explains that Venezuela is turning into a Cuban-style dictatorship.

He asks what good is Cuba's high literacy rate if the government prevents the people from reading the things that they want to read.

He asks what good is Cuba's medical care if doctors can make more money from driving a taxi than from working as a doctor.

He asks why, if Cuba is as great as its supporters in the U.S. say it is, do so many refugees, doctors, and baseball players flee Cuba for the United States, instead of it being the other way around.

He says that the reason Venezuela has a shortage of toiler paper is because communism doesn't work.

He talks about the arrests and censorship of protestors in Venezuela.

He argues for a U.S. embargo against Venezuela, which is the only thing he says that I don't see agree with. I think an embargo would hurt the people of Venezuela, and would make it easier for their government to censor and suppress them. I also oppose the U.S. embargo against Cuba. I think the U.S. should offer citizenship to every anti-communist citizen of Venezuela and Cuba. I think we should send lots of large ships to Cubs every day and bring back every Cuban citizen who wishes to live in the U.S. After a few months, Castro wouldn't have anyone to rule over, because everyone would have left the country.


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Old 02-26-14, 08:45 PM   #59
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

I think he forgot about China, Laos & Vietnam.
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Old 02-26-14, 11:21 PM   #60
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Why So Blu? View Post
You should watch the satire piece "Walker" directed by Alex Cox starring Ed Harris. It's a great flick and Criterion put out the DVD.

Very subversive pic.
I will try.
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Old 02-27-14, 10:00 AM   #61
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by grundle View Post
Since you think I am wrong, please explain what those articles really mean.


.






No. I think such a boycott would hurt the Venezuelan people.


.

In this excellent 14 minute speech, Marco Rubio explains that Venezuela is turning into a Cuban-style dictatorship.

He asks what good is Cuba's high literacy rate if the government prevents the people from reading the things that they want to read.

He asks what good is Cuba's medical care if doctors can make more money from driving a taxi than from working as a doctor.

He asks why, if Cuba is as great as its supporters in the U.S. say it is, do so many refugees, doctors, and baseball players flee Cuba for the United States, instead of it being the other way around.

He says that the reason Venezuela has a shortage of toiler paper is because communism doesn't work.

He talks about the arrests and censorship of protestors in Venezuela.

He argues for a U.S. embargo against Venezuela, which is the only thing he says that I don't see agree with. I think an embargo would hurt the people of Venezuela, and would make it easier for their government to censor and suppress them. I also oppose the U.S. embargo against Cuba. I think the U.S. should offer citizenship to every anti-communist citizen of Venezuela and Cuba. I think we should send lots of large ships to Cubs every day and bring back every Cuban citizen who wishes to live in the U.S. After a few months, Castro wouldn't have anyone to rule over, because everyone would have left the country.


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Old 02-27-14, 11:03 AM   #62
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Some if you seem to (simplistically) think Cuba exists in a vaccuum.
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Old 02-27-14, 08:18 PM   #63
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by van der graaf View Post
Some if you seem to (simplistically) think Cuba exists in a vaccuum.

Please explain what you mean.
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Old 02-28-14, 10:24 PM   #64
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

This new article is about people waiting in very long lines to buy food, and includes a photograph which shows how severe the problem is. But before I post it, I want to explain how it came to be this way. This did not just come about overnight. It is a direct result of policies that have been in place at least since 2003, and which have been getting more and more severe. Hugo Chavez was an incompetent, communist dictator, who wreaked havoc on Venezuela’s ability to produce goods and services. And now Maduro is continuing his policies.

How do I know that Chavez was a dictator?

Because only a dictator would use the military to seize food from private owners.

How do I know that Chavez was incompetent?

Because only a complete incompetent could create a shortage of gasoline in a country that has some of the world’s biggest oil reserves.

How do I know that Chavez was a communist?

Because only a communist would label toilet paper as a “luxury.”

Hugo Chavez did all of those things, plus a whole lot more.

Here are plenty of examples:

From 2003 until his death a decade later, Chavez had been setting strict price controls on food, and these price controls caused shortages and hoarding.

In January 2008, Chavez ordered the military to seize 750 tons of food that sellers were illegally trying to smuggle across the border to sell for higher prices than what was legal in Venezuela.

In February 2009, Chavez ordered the military to temporarily seize control of all the rice processing plants in the country and force them to produce at full capacity, which they had been avoiding in response to the price caps.

In May 2010, Chavez ordered the military to seize 120 tons of food from Empresas Polar.

In March 2009, Chavez set minimum production quotas for 12 basic foods that were subject to price controls, including white rice, cooking oil, coffee, sugar, powdered milk, cheese, and tomato sauce. Business leaders and food producers claimed that the government was forcing them to produce this food at a loss.

Chavez nationalized many large farms.

Chavez said of the farmland: “The land is not private. It is the property of the state.”

Some of the farmland that had been productive while under private ownership became idle under government ownership, and some of the farm equipment sat gathering dust. As a result, food production fell substantially.

One farmer, referring to the government officials overseeing the land redistribution, stated: “These people know nothing about agriculture.”

Chavez seized many supermarkets from their owners. Under government ownership, the shelves in these supermarkets were often empty.

In 2010, after the government nationalized the port at Puerto Cabello, more than 120,000 tons of food sat rotting at the port.

In May 2010, after price controls caused shortages of beef, at least 40 butchers were arrested, and some of them were held at a military base and strip searched by police.

Chavez’s price controls caused shortages of materials used in the construction industry.

Chavez nationalized key industries, including telephone, electricity, steel, and cement.

As a result of Chavez’s nationalizations of the steel and cement industries, production fell substantially. Nationwide production of steel rods declined 20 percent in September 2010 compared with a year earlier. Cement output fell 40 percent in the second half of 2009. These shortages caused new housing construction in 2010 to fall to less than half that of the previous year.

In 2010, the government’s mismanagement of the nationalized oil industry was so severe that the country actually had to import gasoline, despite having some of the hugest oil reserves in the world.

Also in 2010, the government’s mismanagement of the nationalized electricity industry caused shortages of electricity.

In December 2006, the Venezuelan government instituted a 15% tax on imported toilet paper, which it described as being a “luxury.”

Chavez shut down a private TV station that had criticized him.

Because of Chavez’s criticism and legal attacks against the productive members of his country, the country experienced a substantial brain drain. Doctors, teachers, entrepreneurs, business owners, software developers, advertising account executives, scientists, classical musicians, and lawyers fled the country.

Of this brain drain, Investor’s Business Daily wrote: “Chavez talks a lot about Venezuela being a rich country, and extols its vast oil wealth. But the human capital he is throwing out is far more valuable… He’s throwing away his country’s biggest treasure.”

So, after waging war against the productive members of the country for more than a decade, this is what the government has created:

http://www.businessinsider.com/long-...nezuela-2014-2

This Is A Food Line In Venezuela

February 28, 2014



People line up to buy food at a supermarket in San Cristobal, about 410 miles (660 km) southwest of Caracas, Feb. 27, 2014. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Pope Francis called Wednesday for an end to violence in Venezuela that has killed at least 13 people and urged politicians to take the lead in calming the nation's worst unrest in a decade.

One of the reasons Venezuelans have been protesting all over the country for weeks is because of mass shortages of food and other goods.

In December, opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez compared the country's astonishing inflation rate to Zimbabwe's. Consumer prices have risen 56% since Nicolas Maduro took power in 2013.

This line gives you a pretty stunning impression of what that's like — of how many Venezuelans have to get in line for hours to feed themselves and their families every day.

The photo was taken in San Cristobal, the capital city of the Venezuelan mountainous western state of Táchira. It's one of the epicenters of the protests, in which at least 15 have died.

And the demonstrations show no signs of abating, despite Lopez's arrest last week.

On Wednesday, the government announced new measures to try to stem inflation by creating a secondary market in which state oil firm Petroleos de Venezuela SA, individuals and other companies can purchase dollars.

President Nicolas Maduro is trying less-orthodox measures to quell protests as well. This week he announced an early start to the country's pre-Lenten Carnival festivities, meant to take place this weekend.

"The oligarchy wants to take Carnival away from the people," said Maduro to a crowd of supporters on Wednesday. "Do you all agree with that?

"No," they cried.

"Do you want me to suspend Carnival this year," he asked.

"No!"

He went on to ask if they wanted him to take Carnival from kids and cultural groups. (Of course not.)

"That is fascism," he continued. "To take from the people their cultural rights, their right to Carnival, is pure fascism!"

Despite that compelling argument, it seems the protestors aren't heading off to the beach to party on Maduro's order. They're still in the streets. The protester in the center of the picture below, taken outside a metro station in Caracas, is holding a sign that reads, "We'll trade you Carnival for security and food."

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Old 02-28-14, 10:45 PM   #65
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

tl;dr
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Old 03-01-14, 12:28 PM   #66
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

I wonder if Salvadorans seeing what has been going on in Venezuela will still want to vote for the narco-whore FMLN candidate in the run-offs next week.
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Old 03-01-14, 01:05 PM   #67
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by grundle View Post
This new article is about people waiting in very long lines to buy food, and includes a photograph which shows how severe the problem is. But before I post it, I want to explain how it came to be this way. This did not just come about overnight. It is a direct result of policies that have been in place at least since 2003, and which have been getting more and more severe. Hugo Chavez was an incompetent, communist dictator, who wreaked havoc on Venezuela’s ability to produce goods and services. And now Maduro is continuing his policies.

How do I know that Chavez was a dictator?

Because only a dictator would use the military to seize food from private owners.

How do I know that Chavez was incompetent?

Because only a complete incompetent could create a shortage of gasoline in a country that has some of the world’s biggest oil reserves.

How do I know that Chavez was a communist?

Because only a communist would label toilet paper as a “luxury.”

Hugo Chavez did all of those things, plus a whole lot more.

Here are plenty of examples:

From 2003 until his death a decade later, Chavez had been setting strict price controls on food, and these price controls caused shortages and hoarding.

In January 2008, Chavez ordered the military to seize 750 tons of food that sellers were illegally trying to smuggle across the border to sell for higher prices than what was legal in Venezuela.

In February 2009, Chavez ordered the military to temporarily seize control of all the rice processing plants in the country and force them to produce at full capacity, which they had been avoiding in response to the price caps.

In May 2010, Chavez ordered the military to seize 120 tons of food from Empresas Polar.

In March 2009, Chavez set minimum production quotas for 12 basic foods that were subject to price controls, including white rice, cooking oil, coffee, sugar, powdered milk, cheese, and tomato sauce. Business leaders and food producers claimed that the government was forcing them to produce this food at a loss.

Chavez nationalized many large farms.

Chavez said of the farmland: “The land is not private. It is the property of the state.”

Some of the farmland that had been productive while under private ownership became idle under government ownership, and some of the farm equipment sat gathering dust. As a result, food production fell substantially.

One farmer, referring to the government officials overseeing the land redistribution, stated: “These people know nothing about agriculture.”

Chavez seized many supermarkets from their owners. Under government ownership, the shelves in these supermarkets were often empty.

In 2010, after the government nationalized the port at Puerto Cabello, more than 120,000 tons of food sat rotting at the port.

In May 2010, after price controls caused shortages of beef, at least 40 butchers were arrested, and some of them were held at a military base and strip searched by police.

Chavez’s price controls caused shortages of materials used in the construction industry.

Chavez nationalized key industries, including telephone, electricity, steel, and cement.

As a result of Chavez’s nationalizations of the steel and cement industries, production fell substantially. Nationwide production of steel rods declined 20 percent in September 2010 compared with a year earlier. Cement output fell 40 percent in the second half of 2009. These shortages caused new housing construction in 2010 to fall to less than half that of the previous year.

In 2010, the government’s mismanagement of the nationalized oil industry was so severe that the country actually had to import gasoline, despite having some of the hugest oil reserves in the world.

Also in 2010, the government’s mismanagement of the nationalized electricity industry caused shortages of electricity.

In December 2006, the Venezuelan government instituted a 15% tax on imported toilet paper, which it described as being a “luxury.”

Chavez shut down a private TV station that had criticized him.

Because of Chavez’s criticism and legal attacks against the productive members of his country, the country experienced a substantial brain drain. Doctors, teachers, entrepreneurs, business owners, software developers, advertising account executives, scientists, classical musicians, and lawyers fled the country.

Of this brain drain, Investor’s Business Daily wrote: “Chavez talks a lot about Venezuela being a rich country, and extols its vast oil wealth. But the human capital he is throwing out is far more valuable… He’s throwing away his country’s biggest treasure.”

So, after waging war against the productive members of the country for more than a decade, this is what the government has created:

http://www.businessinsider.com/long-...nezuela-2014-2



People line up to buy food at a supermarket in San Cristobal, about 410 miles (660 km) southwest of Caracas, Feb. 27, 2014. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Pope Francis called Wednesday for an end to violence in Venezuela that has killed at least 13 people and urged politicians to take the lead in calming the nation's worst unrest in a decade.

One of the reasons Venezuelans have been protesting all over the country for weeks is because of mass shortages of food and other goods.

In December, opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez compared the country's astonishing inflation rate to Zimbabwe's. Consumer prices have risen 56% since Nicolas Maduro took power in 2013.

This line gives you a pretty stunning impression of what that's like — of how many Venezuelans have to get in line for hours to feed themselves and their families every day.

The photo was taken in San Cristobal, the capital city of the Venezuelan mountainous western state of Táchira. It's one of the epicenters of the protests, in which at least 15 have died.

And the demonstrations show no signs of abating, despite Lopez's arrest last week.

On Wednesday, the government announced new measures to try to stem inflation by creating a secondary market in which state oil firm Petroleos de Venezuela SA, individuals and other companies can purchase dollars.

President Nicolas Maduro is trying less-orthodox measures to quell protests as well. This week he announced an early start to the country's pre-Lenten Carnival festivities, meant to take place this weekend.

"The oligarchy wants to take Carnival away from the people," said Maduro to a crowd of supporters on Wednesday. "Do you all agree with that?

"No," they cried.

"Do you want me to suspend Carnival this year," he asked.

"No!"

He went on to ask if they wanted him to take Carnival from kids and cultural groups. (Of course not.)

"That is fascism," he continued. "To take from the people their cultural rights, their right to Carnival, is pure fascism!"

Despite that compelling argument, it seems the protestors aren't heading off to the beach to party on Maduro's order. They're still in the streets. The protester in the center of the picture below, taken outside a metro station in Caracas, is holding a sign that reads, "We'll trade you Carnival for security and food."
Well sure, if you're going to nitpick.
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Old 01-10-15, 06:36 AM   #68
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Military troops are stationed in supemarkets, telling customers not to take pictures of empty shelves. But that hasn't stopped them:


http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-30710014

Why are Venezuelans posting pictures of empty shelves?

January 8, 2015

So why did posting pictures of empty shelves suddenly become a thing on Venezuelan social media this week? The hashtag #AnaquelesVaciosEnVenezuela ("Empty shelves in Venezuela") became a worldwide Twitter trend, with over 200,000 tweets.

BBC Trending have established that it all began on New Year's Eve, when photographer Alejandro Cegarra stood across the street from a branch of the Excelsior Gama supermarket chain. He was trying to take a shot of the many long queues outside the store. He was approached by officers of the National Guard who ordered him to stop, and he live tweeted about it - capturing the attention of hundreds.

https://twitter.com/Indiferencia/sta...016064/photo/1

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Old 01-10-15, 09:46 AM   #69
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Let them eat shelves.

Mmm, high in fiber.
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Old 01-12-15, 09:56 AM   #70
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

People waiting in line to buy food:

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Old 02-07-15, 11:00 PM   #71
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Good news!

The Venezuelan government is taking over the supermarkets, so there will no longer be any shortages!


http://news.yahoo.com/venezuela-inco...015606462.html

Venezuela to incorporate occupied grocery into state system

February 6, 2015

CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Friday announced that an occupied supermarket chain officials accuse of hoarding products will be folded into the state food distribution system.

Maduro said the 35 locations of the Dia a Dia grocery chain will be assimilated into the state grocery agency starting this weekend. He did not say if the change would be permanent, and stopped short of calling it an expropriation.

He accused the chain of "carrying out a war against the people," referring to the government's assertion that right-wing business owners are purposely making shopping a nightmare by hoarding goods to cause the shortages and long lineups that are plaguing Venezuela.

Soldiers had occupied the Dia a Dia chain earlier this week and on Friday the attorney general's office announced the continued detention of Dia a Dia's director.

Earlier, two executives of Venezuela's largest drugstore chain, Farmatodo, were detained as part of an investigation by price-control authorities.

Many economists blame price and currency controls for causing the economic distortions plaguing Venezuela at a time when falling oil prices are battering its revenues.

The Caracas Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Services rejected government accusations that the private sector is the cause of the severe economic crisis, shortages and soaring inflation in Venezuela.

In a statement, it said the economic problems are the result of "an economic model, 21st century socialism, that with its controls and obstacles has devastated the country's private productive capacity."
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Old 04-06-15, 05:09 AM   #72
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

When Hugo Chavez called his policies "21st century socialism," he never actually said how it would be any different from 20th century socialism. That's because there is no difference.

At the supermarkets, some of which are owned by the government (and even at the privately owned ones, which are subject to government price controls), the government controlled price for toilet paper is only 8 cents a roll, but you have to wait in line for four hours to get it. In the illegal black market, the price is 50 cents a roll, but there is no waiting in line. Apparently, the socialists who imposed the price controls don't think that people's time has any value.

One can only imagine the level of idiocy in the country's government leaders that actually caused there to be a black market in toilet paper.


http://www.businessinsider.com/venez...t-paper-2015-4

Venezuela reaches the final stage of socialism: no toilet paper

April 5, 2015

In 1990 I went to a Cato Institute conference in what was then still the Soviet Union. We were told to bring our own toilet paper, which was in fact useful advice.

Now, after only 16 years of Chavista rule, Venezuela has demonstrated that "Socialism of the 21st Century" is pretty much like socialism in the 20th century. Fusion reports:

Quote:
Venezuela's product shortages have become so severe that some hotels in that country are asking guests to bring their own toilet paper and soap, a local tourism industry spokesman said on Wednesday….

"It's an extreme situation," says Xinia Camacho, owner of a 20-room boutique hotel in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada national park. "For over a year we haven't had toilet paper, soap, any kind of milk, coffee or sugar. So we have to tell our guests to come prepared."…

Montilla says bigger hotels can circumvent product shortages by buying toilet paper and other basic supplies from black market smugglers who charge up to 6-times the regular price.
But smaller, family-run hotels can't always afford to pay such steep prices, which means that sometimes they have to make do without.

Camacho says she refuses to buy toilet paper from the black market on principle.

"In the black market you have to pay 110 bolivares [$0.50] for a roll of toilet paper that usually costs 17 bolivares [$ 0.08] in the supermarket," Camacho told Fusion. "We don't want to participate in the corruption of the black market, and I don't have four hours a day to line up for toilet paper" at a supermarket….


Recently, Venezuelan officials have been stopping people from transporting essential goods across the country in an effort to stem the flow of contraband. So now Camacho's guests could potentially have their toilet paper confiscated before they even make it to the hotel.
Shortages, queues, black markets, and official theft. And blaming the CIA. Yes, Venezuela has truly achieved socialism.

But what I never understood is this: Why toilet paper? How hard is it to make toilet paper? I can understand a socialist economy having trouble producing decent cars or computers. But toilet paper? And soap? And matches?

Sure, it's been said that if you tried communism in the Sahara, you'd get a shortage of sand. Still, a shortage of paper seems like a real achievement.
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Old 04-06-15, 05:18 AM   #73
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

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Old 05-04-15, 02:14 PM   #74
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

Bad idea!


http://news.yahoo.com/venezuela-nati...191734377.html

Venezuela to nationalize food distribution

May 2, 2015

Caracas (AFP) - Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has promised to nationalize food distribution in the South American nation beset with record shortages of basic goods, runaway inflation and an escalating economic crisis.

During a rally Friday, on International Workers' Day, the socialist leader allowed a union activist to ask for the nationalization of food and essential-item distribution.

Citing new decree-making powers recently granted by the National Assembly, Maduro said he would carry out such a measure "in the coming days and weeks."

Maduro had pledged earlier in the week to announce economic reforms.

Various estimates suggest the government already controls about half of the country's food distribution, but that hasn't stopped record shortages in shops and markets.

Venezuela is struggling with a recession, 68.5-percent annual inflation and severe shortages of the basic goods that it relies on oil money to import.

On any given day, people in Venezuela can wait hours to get some subsidized milk, cooking oil, milk or flour -- if they can be found at all.

Maduro's government is strapped for cash in the face of a global supply glut that caused oil prices to collapse by more than 50 percent between June and January.

Nonetheless, Maduro also announced a 30-percent increase in public wages on Friday.

Maduro was elected by a razor-thin margin in April 2013, succeeding his late mentor Hugo Chavez, who died a month earlier after 14 years in power.
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Old 08-02-15, 05:13 PM   #75
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re: The Venezuela / Socialism Thread

This brand new video from July 26, 2015 shows the results of the government takeovers of the food industry and supermarkets in Venezuela:


Last edited by grundle; 08-02-15 at 05:23 PM.
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