Release List Reviews Shop Join News DVD Giveaways Video Games Advertise
DVD Reviews | Theatrical Reviews | Adult DVD Reviews | Video Game Reviews | Price Search Buy Stuff Here
DVD Talk
DVD Reviews DVD Talk Headlines HD Reviews


Add to My Yahoo! - RSS 2.0 - RSS 2.0 - DVD Talk Podcast RSS -


Go Back   DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk > Religion, Politics and World Events

Religion, Politics and World Events They make great dinner conversation, don't you think? plus Political Film

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-10-09, 10:59 AM   #1
orangecrush
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Formerly known as "orangecrush18" - still legal though
Posts: 13,192
Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

http://www.economist.com/opinion/dis...=hptextfeature
I was listening to the Economist podcast about this and they had a lady from Georgia talking about the harshness of Georgia's sex offender's laws. Overall, this article lays out some good reasons why our sex offender laws are way too harsh.

Spoilerized for size and bolded for your convience.
Spoiler:
Sex laws

Unjust and ineffective
Aug 6th 2009 | HARLEM, GEORGIA
From The Economist print edition

America has pioneered the harsh punishment of sex offenders. Does it work?

Illustration by Noma Barr
ONE day in 1996 the lights went off in a classroom in Georgia so that the students could watch a video. Wendy Whitaker, a 17-year-old pupil at the time, was sitting near the back. The boy next to her suggested that, since it was dark, she could perform oral sex on him without anyone noticing. She obliged. And that single teenage fumble wrecked her life.

Her classmate was three weeks shy of his 16th birthday. That made Ms Whitaker a criminal. She was arrested and charged with sodomy, which in Georgia can refer to oral sex. She met her court-appointed lawyer five minutes before the hearing. He told her to plead guilty. She did not really understand what was going on, so she did as she was told.


She was sentenced to five years on probation. Not being the most organised of people, she failed to meet all the conditions, such as checking in regularly with her probation officer. For a series of technical violations, she was incarcerated for more than a year, in the county jail, the state women’s prison and a boot camp. “I was in there with people who killed people. It’s crazy,” she says.

She finished her probation in 2002. But her ordeal continues. Georgia puts sex offenders on a public registry. Ms Whitaker’s name, photograph and address are easily accessible online, along with the information that she was convicted of “sodomy”. The website does not explain what she actually did. But since it describes itself as a list of people who have “been convicted of a criminal offence against a victim who is a minor or any dangerous sexual offence”, it makes it sound as if she did something terrible to a helpless child. She sees people whispering, and parents pulling their children indoors when she walks by.

Punish first, think later
The registry is a gold mine for lazy journalists. A local television station featured Ms Whitaker in a spot on local sex offenders, broadcasting a helpful map showing where she lives but leaving the specifics of the crime to each viewer’s fearful imagination. “My husband’s family saw me on TV,” she says. “That’s embarrassing.”

What Ms Whitaker did is no longer a crime in Georgia. The state’s sodomy laws, which in 1996 barred oral sex even between willing spouses, were struck down by court rulings in 1998 and 2003. And since 2006, thanks to a “Romeo and Juliet” clause in a sex-crimes law, consensual sex between two teenagers has been a misdemeanour, not a crime, if one partner is underage but no more than four years younger than the other.

The Romeo and Juliet clause was not retroactive, however, so Ms Whitaker is stuck on the register, and subject to extraordinary restrictions. Registered sex offenders in Georgia are barred from living within 1,000 feet of anywhere children may congregate, such as a school, a park, a library, or a swimming pool. They are also banned from working within 1,000 feet of a school or a child-care centre. Since the church at the end of Ms Whitaker’s street houses a child-care centre, she was evicted from her home. Her husband, who worked for the county dog-catching department, moved with her, lost his job and with it their health insurance.

Thanks to a lawsuit filed by the Southern Centre for Human Rights, a group that campaigns against rough justice, Ms Whitaker won an injunction allowing her to return home. But her husband did not get his job back, and now works as a labourer. The two of them are struggling financially. And Ms Whitaker is still fighting to get her name removed from the registry. “When you’re a teenager, you do stuff,” she says. “You don’t think you’ll be paying for it when you’re nearly 30.”

Every American state keeps a register of sex offenders. California has had one since 1947, but most states started theirs in the 1990s. Many people assume that anyone listed on a sex-offender registry must be a rapist or a child molester. But most states spread the net much more widely. A report by Sarah Tofte of Human Rights Watch, a pressure group, found that at least five states required men to register if they were caught visiting prostitutes. At least 13 required it for urinating in public (in two of which, only if a child was present). No fewer than 29 states required registration for teenagers who had consensual sex with another teenager. And 32 states registered flashers and streakers.

Because so many offences require registration, the number of registered sex offenders in America has exploded. As of December last year, there were 674,000 of them, according to the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children. If they were all crammed into a single state, it would be more populous than Wyoming, Vermont or North Dakota. As a share of its population, America registers more than four times as many people as Britain, which is unusually harsh on sex offenders. America’s registers keep swelling, not least because in 17 states, registration is for life.

Georgia has more than 17,000 registered sex offenders. Some are highly dangerous. But many are not. And it is fiendishly hard for anyone browsing the registry to tell the one from the other. The Georgia Sex Offender Registration Review Board, an official body, assessed a sample of offenders on the registry last year and concluded that 65% of them posed little threat. Another 30% were potentially threatening, and 5% were clearly dangerous. The board recommended that the first group be allowed to live and work wherever they liked. The second group could reasonably be barred from living or working in certain places, said the board, and the third group should be subject to tight restrictions and a lifetime of monitoring. A very small number “just over 100” are classified as “predators”, which means they have a compulsion to commit sex offences. When not in jail, predators must wear ankle bracelets that track where they are.

Despite the board’s findings, non-violent offenders remain listed and subject to a giant cobweb of controls. One rule, championed by Georgia’s House majority leader, banned them from living within 1,000 feet of a school bus stop. This proved unworkable. Thomas Brown, the sheriff of DeKalb county near Atlanta, mapped the bus stops in his patch and realised that he would have to evict all 490 of the sex offenders living there. Other than the bottom of a lake or the middle of a forest, there was hardly anywhere in Georgia for them to live legally. In the end Georgia’s courts stepped in and suspended the bus-stop rule, along with another barring sex offenders from volunteering in churches. But most other restrictions remain.

Sex-offender registries are popular. Rape and child molestation are terrible crimes that can traumatise their victims for life. All parents want to protect their children from sexual predators, so politicians can nearly always win votes by promising curbs on them. Those who object can be called soft on child-molesters, a label most politicians would rather avoid. This creates a ratchet effect. Every lawmaker who wants to sound tough on sex offenders has to propose a law tougher than the one enacted by the last politician who wanted to sound tough on sex offenders.

A self-defeating pillory
So laws get harsher and harsher. But that does not necessarily mean they get better. If there are thousands of offenders on a registry, it is harder to keep track of the most dangerous ones. Budgets are tight. Georgia’s sheriffs complain that they have been given no extra money or manpower to help them keep the huge and swelling sex-offenders’ registry up to date or to police its confusing mass of rules. Terry Norris of the Georgia Sheriffs’ Association cites a man who was convicted of statutory rape two decades ago for having consensual sex with his high-school sweetheart, to whom he is now married. “It doesn’t make it right, but it doesn’t make him a threat to anybody,” says Mr Norris. “We spend the same amount of time on that guy as on someone who’s done something heinous.”

Money spent on evicting sex offenders cannot be spent on treating them. Does this matter? Politicians pushing the get-tough approach sometimes claim that sex offenders are mostly incorrigible: that three-quarters or even nine out of ten of them reoffend. It is not clear where they find such numbers. A study of nearly 10,000 male sex offenders in 15 American states found that 5% were rearrested for a sex crime within three years. A meta-analysis of 29,000 sex offenders in Canada, Britain and America found that 24% had reoffended after 15 years.

That is obviously still too high. Whether or not treatment can help is disputed. A Californian study of sex offenders who underwent “relapse prevention”, counselling of the sort that alcoholics get from Alcoholics Anonymous, found that it was useless. But a meta-analysis of 23 studies by Karl Hanson of Canada’s department of public safety found that psychological therapy was associated with a 43% drop in recidivism. Some offenders—particularly men who rape boys—are extremely hard to treat. Some will never change until they are too old to feel sexual urges. But some types of treatment appear to work for some people and further research could yield more breakthroughs.

Publicising sex offenders’ addresses makes them vulnerable to vigilantism. In April 2006, for example, a vigilante shot and killed two sex offenders in Maine after finding their addresses on the registry. One of the victims had been convicted of having consensual sex with his 15-year-old girlfriend when he was 19. In Washington state in 2005 a man posed as an FBI agent to enter the home of two sex offenders, warning them that they were on a “hit list” on the internet. Then he killed them.

Murders of sex offenders are rare, but harassment is common.
Most of the offenders interviewed for this article said they had experienced it. “Bill”, who spent nine months in jail for having consensual sex with a 15-year-old when he was 27 and is now registered in North Carolina, says someone put up posters with his photograph on them around his district. (In at least four states, each offender’s profile on the online registry comes with a handy “click to print” function.) The local kids promptly stopped playing with Bill’s three children. And someone started leaving chopped-up sausages on his car, a possible reference to castration. Bill and his family moved house.

Jill Levenson, of Lynn University in Florida, says half of registered sex offenders have trouble finding jobs. From 20% to 40% say they have had to move house because a landlord or neighbour realised they were sex offenders. And most report feeling depressed, hopeless or afraid.

“Mike” spent a year and a half behind bars for statutory rape after having sex with a girl who said she was 17, but was two years younger. He was 22 at the time. Since his release, he has struggled to hold down a job. Once, he found work as a security guard, but his probation officer told him to quit, since the uniform lent him an air of authority, which would not do.

He is now unemployed, and lives in a flophouse in Atlanta between a jail and a strip club. The area is too desolate to have any schools or parks, so he is allowed to live there. His neighbours are mostly other sex offenders and mentally ill folk who talk to themselves. “It’s Bumville,” sighs Mike. His ambition is to get a job, keep it and move out. Any job will do, he says.

Several studies suggest that making it harder for sex offenders to find a home or a job makes them more likely to reoffend. Gwenda Willis and Randolph Grace of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, for example, found that the lack of a place to live was “significantly related to sexual recidivism”. Candace Kruttschnitt and Christopher Uggen of the University of Minnesota and Kelly Shelton of the Minnesota Department of Corrections tracked 556 sex offenders on probation and found less recidivism among those with a history of stable employment.

Some bosses do not mind hiring sex offenders, if they know the full story and the offender does not seem dangerous. But an accessible online registry makes it all but certain that a colleague or a customer will find out about a sexual conviction. Sex offenders often report being sacked for no apparent reason. Mike had a job at a cake shop. His boss knew about his record. But one day, without warning, he was fired.

Publicly accessible sex-offender registries are intended to keep people safe. But there is little evidence that they do. A study by Kristen Zgoba of the New Jersey Department of Corrections found that the state’s system for registering sex offenders and warning their neighbours cost millions of dollars and had no discernible effect on the number of sex crimes. Restricting where sex offenders can live is supposed to keep them away from potential victims, but it is doubtful that this works. A determined predator can always catch a bus.

Laws that make life hard for sex offenders also affect their families. A survey by Ms Levenson found that 86% of family members felt stressed because of registration and residence rules, and 49% feared for their own safety. “It’s very difficult,” says Bill. “Pretty much all the things that make you a good father are now illegal for me to do.” He cannot take his children to a park, a pool, or a museum. He cannot be at any of their school events. And his children are ostracised. “The parents find out I’m registered and that’s it,” he sighs.

The penalties for sex offenders who break the rules can be severe. In Georgia the first time you fail to provide an accurate address or register annually with the county sheriff to be photographed and fingerprinted, you face ten to 30 years in prison. The second time: life. Yet because living on a public sex-offender registry is so wretched, many abscond.

Some states have decided that harsher sex laws are not always better. Iowa has sharply reduced the number of sex offences for which residency restrictions apply. Previously, all Iowan sex offenders who had abused children were barred from living within 2,000 feet of a school or child-care centre. Since where offenders lived was defined as where they slept, many would spend the day at home with their families and sleep at night in their cars at a highway rest stop. “That made no sense,” says Corwin Ritchie of the Iowa County Attorneys Association. “We don’t try to monitor where possible bank robbers sleep.”

The Iowan politicians who relaxed the law gave themselves cover by adding a new rule against “loitering” near schools. Mr Ritchie thinks the new rules are better, but he would rather get rid of the residency restrictions entirely and let probation officers make recommendations for each individual offender.

No quarter
Nationwide, the trend is to keep getting stricter. In 1994 Congress ordered all states that had not yet done so to set up sex-offender registries or lose some funding. Two years later it ordered them to register the most serious offenders for life. In 2006 it passed the Adam Walsh Act, named for a six-year-old boy who was kidnapped and beheaded, broadening the categories of offence for which registration is required and obliging all states to upload their registries to a national database. States had until this summer to comply with that provision. Some objected. In May they were given another year’s breathing space.


Other countries now seem to be following America’s lead. Hottest on its heels is Britain, where the sex-offenders’ registry includes children as young as 11. The British list is not open to the public, but in some areas parents may ask for a check on anyone who has unsupervised access to their child. France, too, now has a closed national directory of sex-offenders, as does Austria, which brought in some American-style movement restrictions on sex offenders earlier this year. After the disappearance in Portugal in 2007 of Madeleine McCann, a British toddler, some European politicians have called for a pan-European registry.

Human Rights Watch urges America to scale back its sex-offender registries. Those convicted of minor, non-violent offences should not be required to register, says Ms Tofte. Nor should juveniles. Sex offenders should be individually assessed, and only those judged likely to rape someone or abuse a child should be registered. Such decisions should be regularly reviewed and offenders who are rehabilitated (or who grow too old to reoffend) should be removed from the registry. The information on sex-offender registries should be held by the police, not published online, says Ms Tofte, and released “on a need-to-know basis”. Blanket bans on all sex offenders living and working in certain areas should be abolished. Instead, it makes sense for the most dangerous offenders sometimes to face tailored restrictions as a condition of parole.

That package of reforms would bring America in line with the strictest laws in other rich countries. But few politicians would have the courage to back it. “Jane”, the mother of a sex offender in Georgia, says she sent a letter to her senator, Saxby Chambliss, urging such reforms. “They didn’t even read it,” she says. “They just sent me a form letter assuring me that they were in favour of every sex offender law, and that [Senator Chambliss] has grandchildren he wants to protect.”
__________________
Everyone else is bound to leave, but you.
And they swear their love is real;
They mean, I like the way you make me feel.

gamertag: IAMNOTwiththem
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 05:58 PM   #2
Ranger
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 19,222
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

There are plenty of sob stories about this, but oral sex in the classroom? Give me a break. I don't feel sorry for her. I think she was lucky to get probation first.

But yes, some of these laws are a bit harsh.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 06:06 PM   #3
crazyronin
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Working for Gizmonic Institute
Posts: 10,303
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
she was sentenced to five years on probation. Not being the most organised of people, she failed to meet all the conditions, such as checking in regularly with her probation officer.

Boo hoo.
__________________
JasonF said it "crazyronin understands scripture better than all those Popes"
the mods around here are morons-wendersfan
PSN and Origin: boomanchu2
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 06:09 PM   #4
kvrdave
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 81,703
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Here's the real problem. We end up putting these people on sexual predator lists, and we will end up with enough people who did stupid things that don't need to be on those lists, which means that the lists will be absolutely ineffective in doing what they were suppose to.

But I have faith government won't fuck up health care.

yes, yes, state vs. federal. I'm sure it can be done much better with the feds.
__________________
Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C.S. Lewis
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 06:27 PM   #5
JasonF
DVD Talk Hero
 
JasonF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 34,475
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by kvrdave View Post
But I have faith government won't fuck up health care.

yes, yes, state vs. federal. I'm sure it can be done much better with the feds.
Clealry, we should leave it to the brilliant private sector minds who brought us success stories like Lehman Brothers and Enron.

(Seriously -- WTF kind of illogical non-sequitur was your post. Something went wrong and the government was involved, therefore the government will necessarily get absolutely everything wrong?)
__________________
These are my DVDs
360 GamerTag: William T Bunny
PSN ID: William_T_Bunny
"JasonF can do no wrong!" -- Rockmjd23
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 06:35 PM   #6
kvrdave
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 81,703
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
Clealry, we should leave it to the brilliant private sector minds who brought us success stories like Lehman Brothers and Enron.

(Seriously -- WTF kind of illogical non-sequitur was your post. Something went wrong and the government was involved, therefore the government will necessarily get absolutely everything wrong?)

I've been paid to organize people against health care.
__________________
Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C.S. Lewis
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 07:02 PM   #7
jfoobar
DVD Talk Hero
 
jfoobar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Posts: 32,759
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by kvrdave View Post
yes, yes, friggin' Georgia vs. federal. I'm sure it can be done much better with the feds.
There. That's better.
__________________
If you can’t say something nice, don’t say something nice.
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 07:33 PM   #8
Rockmjd23
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MA
Posts: 17,001
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Pics?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 10:10 PM   #9
wendersfan
Moderator
 
wendersfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: DOS A CERO
Posts: 29,420
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
Clealry, we should leave it to the brilliant private sector minds who brought us success stories like Lehman Brothers and Enron.

(Seriously -- WTF kind of illogical non-sequitur was your post. Something went wrong and the government was involved, therefore the government will necessarily get absolutely everything wrong?)
I was driving on a road today, and there was this pothole*. Clearly the government can't be trusted with national defense, and we should disband the army and navy.






*This isn't true. I didn't drive anywhere today.
__________________
"Fifth Element may be as dumb and artless as Johnny Mnemonic, but since a frenchman made it it must be ART!" -Pants
"...I think it's a low blow to draw attention to wendersfan's drunken state. " - dork
"Just because their victims are still alive doesn't mean they didn't commit murder." - grundle
"You concentrate on the sad wanna be hooliganism and let us worry about the actual soccer." - rocketsauce (final score: Columbus 2-Chicago 1)
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-09, 10:41 PM   #10
Superboy
Suspended
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: So Cal
Posts: 7,073
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonF View Post
Clealry, we should leave it to the brilliant private sector minds who brought us success stories like Lehman Brothers and Enron.

(Seriously -- WTF kind of illogical non-sequitur was your post. Something went wrong and the government was involved, therefore the government will necessarily get absolutely everything wrong?)
But Enron and the economic crisis was also the fault of the government! if they hadn't been so stupid and let this happen, we wouldn't be in this mess! so apparently, the government is so stupid, we need them to keep us from doing stupid things! that's how stupid we are!
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 01:52 AM   #11
kvrdave
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 81,703
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by Superboy View Post
But Enron and the economic crisis was also the fault of the government! if they hadn't been so stupid and let this happen, we wouldn't be in this mess! so apparently, the government is so stupid, we need them to keep us from doing stupid things! that's how stupid we are!
The government learned from Enron. That's why they are proposing Cap and Trade. There is money in producing nothing but trading a fake commodity.
__________________
Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C.S. Lewis
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 01:59 AM   #12
DVDho78DTS
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,532
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Ms. Whitaker:

  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 05:58 AM   #13
Superboy
Suspended
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: So Cal
Posts: 7,073
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by kvrdave View Post
The government learned from Enron. That's why they are proposing Cap and Trade. There is money in producing nothing but trading a fake commodity.
As un-serious as my comment was, I actually have to agree with you here. Dear god...
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 07:49 AM   #14
maxfisher
DVD Talk Limited Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 5,450
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Misdemeanours(sic) aren't crimes?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 08:40 AM   #15
Red Dog
DVD Talk God
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Directionally Challenged (for DirecTV)
Posts: 113,326
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

This doesn't seem like the best fact pattern to use to argue against sex offender laws.

For Georgia, start with the Genarlow Wilson case:
http://forum.dvdtalk.com/other-talk/...on-merged.html
__________________
"A question for you. Would you rather Bucknell make the NCAA's once every 20 years or so and get ass raped by teams like Kansas in the first round or have them drop down a rung to a confernce where they can compete for a title?"
- Josh Hinkle
1st Round Final Scores: Bucknell 64 Kansas 63 | Bucknell 59 Arkansas 55
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 09:31 AM   #16
Birrman54
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Posts: 3,067
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Genarlow was the first person I thought of - especially when they mentioned the law change wasn't retroactive.
__________________
"The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another." - Milton Friedman
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 09:31 AM   #17
Birrman54
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Posts: 3,067
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by kvrdave View Post
Here's the real problem. We end up putting these people on sexual predator lists, and we will end up with enough people who did stupid things that don't need to be on those lists, which means that the lists will be absolutely ineffective in doing what they were suppose to.

But I have faith government won't fuck up health care.

yes, yes, state vs. federal. I'm sure it can be done much better with the feds.
As long as it's not a list of who gets healthcare we should be okay. The government seems to have trouble with lists.
__________________
"The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another." - Milton Friedman
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 09:47 AM   #18
orangecrush
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Formerly known as "orangecrush18" - still legal though
Posts: 13,192
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Dog View Post
This doesn't seem like the best fact pattern to use to argue against sex offender laws.

For Georgia, start with the Genarlow Wilson case:
http://forum.dvdtalk.com/other-talk/...on-merged.html
Well, it was written by the British...

The first lady listed is probably not the best case, but it is one of many examples of people who are now being unjustly punished many years after they have served their time (there were a few other examples in the article). And as dave pointed out, these lists only serve to dilute the real threats that exist by being over-populated with non-violent offenders who are not likely at all to re-offend.

My wife told me the other day that we don't have laws limiting where sex offenders can live. She was surprised by my response of "good."
__________________
Everyone else is bound to leave, but you.
And they swear their love is real;
They mean, I like the way you make me feel.

gamertag: IAMNOTwiththem
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 09:56 AM   #19
The Bus
DVD Talk Godfather
 
The Bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 52,613
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

__________________
Movies: 2002 / 03 / 04 / 05 / 06 / 07 / 08 / 09 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 2014

PSN: Chiwotweiler
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 09:57 AM   #20
DeputyDave
DVD Talk Legend
 
DeputyDave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 13,710
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by DVD-ho78(DTS) View Post
Ms. Whitaker:

She's ugly so to hell with her. If she were hot I might feel bad for her.

Seriously, all I got from this was wishing I had thought of merely sugesting to a girl in highschool that she go down on me simply because it was dark. I can't believe that would have worked.
__________________
DVDSpot, RIP
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 10:01 AM   #21
orangecrush
DVD Talk Legend
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Formerly known as "orangecrush18" - still legal though
Posts: 13,192
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeputyDave View Post
She's ugly so to hell with her. If she were hot I might feel bad for her.

Seriously, all I got from this was wishing I had thought of merely sugesting to a girl in highschool that she go down on me simply because it was dark. I can't believe that would have worked.
Nah, you wouldn't want the "surprise" you might get from a girl willing to go down on you in the middle of class.
__________________
Everyone else is bound to leave, but you.
And they swear their love is real;
They mean, I like the way you make me feel.

gamertag: IAMNOTwiththem
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 10:10 AM   #22
Birrman54
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Hoboken, NJ
Posts: 3,067
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Bus View Post
An incredible amount of foolishness
__________________
"The great virtue of a free market system is that it does not care what color people are; it does not care what their religion is; it only cares whether they can produce something you want to buy. It is the most effective system we have discovered to enable people who hate one another to deal with one another and help one another." - Milton Friedman
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 11:44 AM   #23
kvrdave
DVD Talk God
 
kvrdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 81,703
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by Superboy View Post
As un-serious as my comment was, I actually have to agree with you here. Dear god...
It is a scary feeling.
__________________
Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victim may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated, but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. - C.S. Lewis
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 12:07 PM   #24
DonnachaOne
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: A place where they know how to pronounce "Donnacha" correctly
Posts: 9,914
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by Birrman54 View Post
An incredible amount of foolishness
What there is foolish?
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-09, 12:21 PM   #25
General Zod
DVD Talk Ruler
 
General Zod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Where it all happens - SoCal
Posts: 17,168
Re: Sex laws Unjust and ineffective

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonnachaOne View Post
What there is foolish?
The internet was NOT developed by the defense advanced research projects but rather by a fellow named Al Gore.
__________________
"Kneel Before Zod"
  Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:21 AM.

Rules - DVD Talk - Archive - Privacy Statement - Top

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2011 DVDTalk.com All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.