Release List Reviews Shop Join News DVD Giveaways Video Games Advertise
DVD Reviews | Theatrical Reviews | Price Search Buy Stuff Here
DVD Talk
DVD Reviews DVD Talk Headlines HD Reviews


Add to My Yahoo! - RSS 2.0 - RSS 2.0 - DVD Talk Podcast RSS -


Go Back   DVD Talk Forum > General Discussions > Other Talk

Other Talk "Otterville" plus Religion/Politics

    Hide Wikipost
Old 12-27-16, 11:39 AM   -   Wikipost
DVD Talk Forum Thread Wiki: Zod's feelgood obituary thread
Please read: This is a community-maintained wiki post containing the most important information from this thread. You may edit the Wiki once you have been a member for 90 days and have made 90 posts.
 
Last edit by: General Zod
This is a place to post death notices/obituaries for lesser-known individuals who probably wouldn't be worthy of an individual thread.

The "feel good" aspect is giving honor to these folks who might fly under the radar, so to speak.

Print Wikipost

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-05-11, 09:24 PM   #101
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Upright, in a cool, dry place
Posts: 4,054
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread


Bill McKinney

Character actor was in 'Deliverance'

Bill McKinney, 80, a character actor who carved out a career playing rough-and-tumble villains, most notably the backwoods man who sexually assaults Ned Beatty's character in the 1972 film "Deliverance," died Thursday of esophageal cancer at Valley Presbyterian Hospice in Van Nuys, said close friend Julie Mondin. Mondin was assisting McKinney with his autobiography, which has not yet been published.

A Tennessee native, McKinney inhabited the key role of one of the backwoods locals who terrorize Beatty, Burt Reynolds, Jon Voight and Ronny Cox during a river rafting trip gone bad in John Boorman's "Deliverance."

McKinney also appeared in a string of Clint Eastwood movies — "The Outlaw Josey Wales," "The Gauntlet," "Every Which Way but Loose," "Bronco Billy" and "Any Which Way You Can." He had other movie roles in "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean," "The Parallax View," "The Shootist," "First Blood" and "Against All Odds."

McKinney also acted in television series including "McCloud," "Columbo," "Ironside," "Starsky and Hutch," "B.J. and the Bear" and "The A-Team."

Born Sept. 12, 1931, in Chattanooga, Tenn., McKinney was raised by his grandmother. After serving in the Navy, he studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse and began appearing on TV and in films in the late 1960s.

"Acting helps you release whatever's there to be released," he said in a 1983 interview with The Times' Charles Champlin. "What you do is build yourself a playground and turn yourself loose."
http://www.latimes.com/news/obituari...,2908924.story




I think in honor of Mr. McKinney, everybody should squeal like a pig.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-11, 10:37 PM   #102
DVD Talk Ultimate Edition
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Upright, in a cool, dry place
Posts: 4,054
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

'Laugh-In' comic actor Alan Sues dies at 85

By ANDREW DALTON, Associated Press – 21 hours ago

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Alan Sues, who brought his flamboyant and over-the-top comic persona to the hit television show "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In" in the 1960s and 1970s, has died, a close friend said Sunday night.

Sues died of cardiac arrest on Thursday at his home in West Hollywood, Michael Gregg Michaud, a friend since 1975, told The Associated Press.

"He was sitting in a recliner watching TV with his dachshund Doris who he loved in his lap," Michaud said.

Sues had various health problems in the last several years, but the death came as a shock to friends, Michaud said. He was 85.

A native Californian who moved to New York in 1952, Sues began his career as a serious actor and in 1953 appeared in director Elia Kazan's "Tea and Sympathy" on Broadway.

But he would be remembered for his wild comic characters.

They included "Big Al," an effeminate sportscaster, and "Uncle Al the Kiddies Pal," a hung-over children's show host, on "Laugh-In," the TV phenomenon that both reflected and mocked the era's counterculture and made stars of Goldie Hawn, Lily Tomlin and many others.

Sues also donned tights as the commercial spokesman for Peter Pan peanut butter, and appeared in the popular 1964 "Twilight Zone" episode "The Masks."

Fellow cast members and crew from "Laugh-In" remembered him as even more entertaining behind the scenes.

"Alan Sues was one of those guys even funnier in person than on camera," Ruth Buzzi, a co-star who appeared in many skits with Sues, said on her Twitter account. "Across a dinner table, over the phone ... hysterical. We'll miss him."

Executive producer George Schlatter, who would eventually bring Sues to "Laugh-In" after seeing him alongside future co-star Jo Anne Worley in the Off-Broadway comedy "The Mad Show," said Sues was "a free spirit," an "outrageous human being" and "a love child."

"He was a delight; he was an upper," Schlatter told the Los Angeles Times, which first reported the death. "He walked on the stage and everybody just felt happy."

Sues would always be best known for "Laugh-In," which he left in 1972 before its final season.

But Michaud said the Peter Pan spots brought Sues nearly as much recognition in later years.

And he said the "Twilight Zone" episode brought him appearances at sci-fi and autograph conventions for decades.

"Fans of 'The Twilight Zone' are cuckoo," Michaud said.

Michaud said that while Sues was always cast as the stereotypically gay character, he believed he needed to hide his own gay identity during his years on television.

"He felt like he couldn't publicly come out," Michaud said. "He felt like people wouldn't accept him."

Sues was grateful for "Laugh-In," but wasn't happy he was typecast in his comic persona as he sought to return to more serious acting.

He got one chance that he cherished in 1975, the serious role of Moriarty with the Royal Shakespeare Company in "Sherlock Holmes" on Broadway.

He stayed with the show until it closed the following year, then went out to perform it with the touring company.

In later years he would make many more theater appearances, do voiceover work for television, and appear in guest spots on TV series like "Punky Brewster" and "Sabrina the Teenage Witch."

Sues is survived by a sister-in-law, two nieces and a nephew.

There were no immediate plans for a memorial.
  Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-11, 02:31 PM   #103
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
movie diva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,365
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread



"M*A*S*H" star Harry Morgan died at his home in Los Angeles on Wednesday morning. The character actor was 96.

He was best known for playing Colonel Sherman T. Potter on the long-running army comedy.

In a 2004 interview with the The Television Academy Foundation’s Archive of American Television, Morgan acknowledged the profound effect that the iconoclastic sitcom had on his career.


"He was firm," Morgan said. "He was a good officer and he had a good sense of humor. I think it's the best part I ever had. I loved playing Colonel Potter."

Although "M*A*S*H" made him a television icon, Morgan first came to attention for his role as Officer Bill Gannon, Joe Friday's partner on the revived version of "Dragnet," which aired on NBC from 1967-70.

Morgan's ironically gruff demeanor made him an in-demand character actor for nearly five decades.

He appeared in supporting roles in more than 100 films, many of them classics such as "The Ox-Bow Incident," "High Noon," and "Inherit the Wind."

His resonant voice and irascible verve made him a natural for parts as authority figures, and he was frequently called upon to play judges, lawmen and military officers.

In addition to "M*A*S*H" and "Dragnet," Morgan scored small screen success playing a henpecked husband on “Pete and Gladys” (1960-62), which originated out of a supporting part he played on “December Bride” (1954-59).

Morgan did have one notable off-screen scandal. The character actor was arrested in 1996 and booked for spousal battery after police responded to a 911 call from his wife, Barbara Bushman. Bushman had a cut under her right eye and a swollen foot, according to reports. Charges were dropped after Morgan agreed to attend a six-month domestic violence program.

Morgan also was married to Eileen Detchon for 45 years until her death in 1985.

He is survived by Bushman; three sons from his first marriage, Christopher, Charles and Paul; and eight grandchildren.

Morgan's son, Daniel, died in 1989.
__________________
"You are in a maze of twisty passages, all alike."
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-12, 09:07 AM   #104
DVD Talk Legend
 
wishbone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 19,302
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
'Final Countdown' actor Farentino dies at age 73
By Associated Press

A family spokesman says actor James Farentino, who appeared in dozens of movies and television shows, has died in a Los Angeles hospital. He was 73.

Family spokesman Bob Palmer says Farentino died of heart failure after a long illness at Cedars-Sinai Hospital on Tuesday.

Farentino starred alongside Kirk Douglas and Martin Sheen in a 1980 science fiction film "The Final Countdown."

Farentino also starred opposite Patty Duke in 1969's "Me, Natalie."

He also had recurring roles on "Dynasty," "Melrose Place," "The Bold Ones: The Lawyers" and "ER," playing the estranged father to George Clooney's character.

A four-time divorcee, Farentino's tumultuous personal life made headlines, too.

In March 1994 he pleaded no contest to stalking his ex-girlfriend Tina Sinatra, daughter of Frank Sinatra.
http://todayentertainment.today.msnb...dies-at-age-73



__________________
"Wishbone is spelled with an E not a 3..... *Be gone*" - Minor Threat
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-12, 02:11 PM   #105
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Signal Hill, CA
Posts: 3,012
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Nichol Williamson--

http://www.playbill.com/news/article...tor-Dies-at-73

Quote:
Nicol Williamson, a British stage and film actor of great range, talent and fire who was as well known for his brash antics offstage as he was for his work as a performer, has died. The cause was esophageal cancer. He was 73.

Mr. Williamson's death was announced by his son Luke nearly six weeks after the actor expired on Dec. 16 in Amsterdam. The Dutch city had been the actor's home for the past two decades.

In the early years of his career, Mr. Williamson was heralded as one of the greatest British talents of his generations, an equal to his contemporary Albert Finney. Playwright John Osborne once described him as "the greatest actor since Marlon Brando." Mr. Williamson won international acclaim playing a self-hating lawyer in Osborne's Inadmissable Evidence. When he performed the role on Broadway in 1966, he won a Tony nomination for his work, as well as a New York Drama Critics Circle Award. He was nominated for another Tony for his Uncle Vanya in 1974. In 1970 he was invited to the White House to present a series of excerpts from Shakespearean dramas. Around the same time, he was the subject of a lengthy Kenneth Tynan profile in the New Yorker.

But Mr. Williamson's volatile personality—fueled by excessive drinking and general discomfort and borderline contempt with the attitudes of the theatrical world—derailed the upward ascent of his career. He became known as a man as capable of theatrics off the stage as on. One legendary story had him punching the powerful producer David Merrick while performing in a Philadelphia tryout of Inadmissible Evidence. When asked why he did it, the actor said the producer had it coming to him.

In the 1976 Broadway production of Rex, he struck an actor during a curtain call because he had spoken to someone next to him during Mr. Williamson's bow.

Fifteen years later, Mr. Williamson played the ghost of another self-destructive actor, John Barrymore, in the Broadway premiere of Paul Rudnick's comedy I Hate Hamlet. The production became notorious for the actor's erratic behavior. He frequently broke character and talked to the audience, often deriding the play and his co-stars. During one performance, in the middle of a sword fight, he swatted fellow actor Evan Handler across the backside with his weapon. Mr. Williamson later said he did it to get Handler to "put some life into it! Use your head! Give it more life!" Handler reacted by storming off the stage, leaving the theatre and never returning.

Left onstage alone, the actor turned to the audience and said, "Well, should I sing?"

Perversely, Mr. Williamson's next, and final, appearance on a New York stage was in 1996's Jack: A Night on the Town With John Barrymore, an evening he devised.

Nicol Williamson was born Sept. 24, 1938, in Hamilton, Scotland. He was trained at the RSC and made his professional debut with the Dundee Rep in 1960. He bowed in London the following year in a production of A Midsummer Night's Dream directed by Tony Richardson. With Inadmissible Evidence in 1964, he became a star. He repeated his performance in a 1968 film. That same year, he performed his Hamlet in London, alongside Anthony Hopkins and Marianne Faithfull (with whom he had an affair). He repeated it on Broadway and on film in 1969. The interpretation—directed by Richardson and described as "scruffy, raunchy and crude" by the New York Times—was controversial, with as many supporters as detractors. London, in general, praised the unorthodox approach, while Broadway critics hammered it.

Even this achievement wasn't without a Williamson touch. In the middle of one performance, he apologized to the audience and announced he was retiring.

His films included "The 7 Percent Solution," "Robin and Marian," "The Goodbye Girl," "The Cheap Detective" and "Excalibur."

According to reports, the actor died in relative poverty. If Mr. Williamson was repentant or regretful about the trajectory his career and life had taken, he never let on. "I don't notice competition," he once said. "I'm a center-forward. I don't watch them. Let them watch me."
I loved his portrayal of Merlin in Excalibur and thought his Hamlet was exceptional.

I also thought he was a much older man than the seventy-three years listed as his age at death.
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-12, 02:30 PM   #106
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
movie diva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,365
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread


__________________
"You are in a maze of twisty passages, all alike."
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-12, 02:54 PM   #107
DVD Talk Hero
 
TomOpus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 30,254
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Who will be the 3rd one?
__________________
"Pear Pimples for Hairy Fishnuts!"

My So-Called DVD Life (Profiler),A Fistful of Discs (DVDAf)
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-12, 12:46 AM   #108
DVD Talk Hero
 
TomOpus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 30,254
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Robert Hegyes, played Epstein on 'Welcome Back Kotter,' dies

METUCHEN, N.J. (AP) – Robert Hegyes, the actor best known for playing Jewish Puerto Rican student Juan Epstein on the 1970s TV show "Welcome Back Kotter" has died. He was 60.

The Flynn & Son Funeral Home in Fords, N.J., said it was informed of Hegyes' death Thursday by the actor's family.

A spokesman at JFK Medical Center in Edison, N.J., told the Star-Ledger newspaper that Hegyes, of Metuchen, arrived at the hospital Thursday morning in full cardiac arrest and died.

Hegyes was appearing on Broadway in 1975 when he auditioned for Kotter, a TV series about a teacher who returns to the inner-city New York school of his youth to teach a group of irreverent remedial students nicknamed the "Sweathogs." They included the character Vinnie Barbarino, played by John Travolta.

The show's theme song, performed by John Sebastian, became a pop hit.

Hegyes also appeared on many other TV series, including Cagney & Lacey.

He was born in Perth Amboy and grew up in Metuchen, the eldest child of a Hungarian father and Italian mother.

He attended Rowan University, formerly Glassboro State College, in southern New Jersey, before heading to New York City after graduation. He returned to Rowan on several occasions to teach master classes in acting, a university spokesman said Thursday.

"He was a good friend to the university," spokesman Joe Cardona said.

Hegyes continued to act after Kotter and was a regular on Cagney & Lacey. He also guest-starred in shows including Diagnosis Murder and The Drew Carey Show.

On his website, Hegyes wrote that he was inspired by Chico Marx, whom he had played in a touring production of a show about the Marx Bros. He also recalled how his mother encouraged him to get involved in theater as a teen.

__________________
"Pear Pimples for Hairy Fishnuts!"

My So-Called DVD Life (Profiler),A Fistful of Discs (DVDAf)
  Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-12, 07:28 AM   #109
DVD Talk Legend
 
Vibiana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 12,850
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by TomOpus;11092518[IMG
http://i43.tinypic.com/rldcfb.jpg[/IMG]
Dear Mr. Kotter,

Juan will not be in class today. Neither will the rest of the Sweathogs. It is a very sad day.

Signed,
Epstein's Mother

  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 09:03 AM   #110
DVD Talk Ruler
 
General Zod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Where it all happens - SoCal
Posts: 20,121
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Don Cornelius:

'Soul Train' creator Don Cornelius dead in apparent suicide

"Soul Train" creator Don Cornelius was found dead at his Sherman Oaks on home Wednesday morning.

Law enforcement sources said police arrived at Cornelius' home around 4 a.m. He apparently died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, according to sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the case was ongoing.

The sources said there was no sign of foul play, but the Los Angeles Police Department was investigating.

In a 2010 interview with The Times, he said he was excited about a movie project he was developing about "Soul Train."

"We've been in discussions with several people about getting a movie off the ground. It wouldn't be the 'Soul Train' dance show, it would be more of a biographical look at the project," he said. "It's going to be about some of the things that really happened on the show."

According to a Times article, Cornelius’ “Soul Train” became the longest-running first-run nationally syndicated show in television history, bringing African American music and style to the world for 35 years.

Cornelius stopped hosting the show in 1993, and “Soul Train” ceased production in 2006.

__________________
"Kneel Before Zod"
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 09:04 AM   #111
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Jaymole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: N.Y, N.Y
Posts: 8,795
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by General Zod View Post
Don Cornelius:

'Soul Train' creator Don Cornelius dead in apparent suicide

"Soul Train" creator Don Cornelius was found dead at his Sherman Oaks on home Wednesday morning.

Law enforcement sources said police arrived at Cornelius' home around 4 a.m. He apparently died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, according to sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the case was ongoing.

The sources said there was no sign of foul play, but the Los Angeles Police Department was investigating.

In a 2010 interview with The Times, he said he was excited about a movie project he was developing about "Soul Train."

"We've been in discussions with several people about getting a movie off the ground. It wouldn't be the 'Soul Train' dance show, it would be more of a biographical look at the project," he said. "It's going to be about some of the things that really happened on the show."

According to a Times article, Cornelius’ “Soul Train” became the longest-running first-run nationally syndicated show in television history, bringing African American music and style to the world for 35 years.

Cornelius stopped hosting the show in 1993, and “Soul Train” ceased production in 2006.

RIP

Soul Train was never the same after Amtrak took over.
__________________
Feast Your Eyes, Glut Your Soul on My Accursed Ugliness!
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 09:11 AM   #112
DVD Talk Legend
 
wishbone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 19,302
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Someone in my office just mentioned this to me. He seemed a bit surprised when I replied, "Don Cornelius? Soul Train?" I remember seeing it on Saturday afternoons in the '80s.

Don Cornelius
__________________
"Wishbone is spelled with an E not a 3..... *Be gone*" - Minor Threat
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 09:41 AM   #113
DVD Talk Legend
 
Vibiana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Living in a van down by the river
Posts: 12,850
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

God rest his SOOOOOOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUULLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 09:42 AM   #114
DVD Talk Platinum Edition
 
mickey65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 3,684
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

RIP Don!

__________________
Just for the record...I'm female.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 11:47 AM   #115
DVD Talk Legend
 
whotony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: ^ Kristen Bell
Posts: 17,540
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Rest is piece Mr. Pitt.


Ian Abercrombie, a veteran British stage and screen actor whose TV roles included Elaine’s boss Mr. Pitt on “Seinfeld” and the voice of Chancellor Palpatine in “Star Wars: The Clone Wars,” has died. He was 77.
A website statement from LucasArts said Abercrombie died Friday. A friend, Cathy Lind Hayes, told the Los Angeles Times that he died at a Los Angeles hospital from complications of kidney failure and recently had been diagnosed with lymphoma.
“Though he played a villain on our show, you would be hard pressed to meet a kinder person,” said Dave Filoni, a supervising director for “Clone Wars.” ”He loved to laugh and his sense of humor always lightened our record sessions. I will miss his stories, I will miss his performances, and I will miss his contribution to our show.”
Abercrombie began his career as a dancer and made his American stage debut in a 1951 production of “Stalag 17.”

He appeared in the film “Army of Darkness” and on such TV shows as “Wizards of Waverly Place” and “Birds of Prey,” in which he played Alfred Pennyworth, Bruce Wayne’s butler.
He also voiced the worldly owl Ambrose in the animated movie “Rango” starring Johnny Depp.


  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 11:49 AM   #116
DVD Talk Legend
 
whotony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: ^ Kristen Bell
Posts: 17,540
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by vibiana View Post
god rest his soooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuulllllllllllllllll

:d
omg.

Simple, brilliant.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 07:13 PM   #117
DVD Talk Legend
 
Drexl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 15,857
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Was it Suicide Day or something?

In addition to Don Cornelius, Mike Kelley, an artist whose work included Sonic Youth's "Dirty" album cover, apparently shot himself. Al Rio, a Brazilian comic artist, hanged himself. And there might be another: pop singer Leslie Carter, the sister of Aaron and Nick Carter (Backstreet Boys) is dead, and it's rumored she died of a deliberate overdose.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-12, 10:55 PM   #118
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Formerly known as (ahem) "LASERMOVIES"/California
Posts: 9,464
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Angelo Dundee Dead at 90

By TIM DAHLBERG AP Boxing Writer
February 2, 2012 (AP)

Angelo Dundee, the brilliant motivator who worked the corner for Muhammad Ali in his greatest fights and willed Sugar Ray Leonard to victory in his biggest bout, died Wednesday in Tampa, Fla. He was 90.

The genial Dundee was best known for being in Ali's corner for almost his entire career, but those in boxing also knew him as an ambassador for boxing and a figure of integrity in a sport that often lacked it.

He died with his family surrounding him, said son, Jimmy Dundee, but not before being able to attend Ali's 70th birthday bash in Louisville, Ky., last month.

"It was the way he wanted to go," Jimmy Dundee said. "He did everything he wanted to do."

Promoter Bob Arum said he had been planning to bring Dundee to Las Vegas for a Feb. 18 charity gala headlined by Ali. He called Dundee a legend in the sport, someone who worked the corner for some of the greatest fights of the times.

"He was wonderful, he was the whole package," Arum said. "Angelo was the greatest motivator of all time. No matter how bad things were, Angelo always put a positive spin on them. That's what Ali loved so much about him."

Arum credited Dundee with persuading Ali to continue in his third fight against Joe Frazier when Frazier was coming on strong in the "Thrilla in Manilla." Without Dundee, Arum said, Ali may not have had the strength to come back and stop Frazier after the 14th round in what became an iconic fight.

Dundee also worked the corner for Leonard, famously shouting "You're blowing it son. You're blowing it" when Leonard fell behind in his 1981 fight with Tommy Hearns — a fight he would rally to win by knockout.

A master motivator and clever corner man, Dundee was regarded as one of the sport's great ambassadors. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1994 after a career that spanned six decades, training 15 world champions, including Leonard, George Foreman, Carmen Basilio and Jose Napoles.

But he will always be linked to Ali as one of the most successful fighter-trainer relationships in boxing history, helping Ali become the first to win the heavyweight title three times. The pair would travel around the world for fights to such obscure places as Ali's October 1974 bout in Zaire against Foreman dubbed "The Rumble in the Jungle," and Ali's third fight against Frazier in the Philippines.

"I just put the reflexes in the proper direction," Dundee said in a 2005 interview with The Associated Press.

Their partnership began in Louisville, Ali's hometown, in 1959. Dundee was there with light heavyweight Willie Pastrano when the young Ali, then known as Cassius Clay, called their room from a hotel phone to ask if he could have five minutes. Clay, a local Golden Gloves champion, kept asking the men boxing questions in a conversation that lasted 3˝ hours, according to Dundee's autobiography, "My View From the Corner: A Life in Boxing."

After Ali returned from Rome with a gold medal at the 1960 Olympics, Dundee ran into him in Louisville and invited him to come to Miami Beach to train. Ali declined. But that December, Dundee got a call from one of Ali's handlers, seeking to hire Dundee. After Ali won his first pro fight, Dundee accepted.

He helped Ali claim the heavyweight title for the first time on Feb. 25, 1964, when Sonny Liston quit on his stool after the sixth round during their fight in Miami Beach.

This is a long article. More at the link.
http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireSto...5#.TyoVzOTO2uo
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-12, 12:04 AM   #119
X
Administrator
 
X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1987
Location: AA-
Posts: 10,566
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

It took a really long time, but he finally succumbed...

Quote:
Popular character actor Ben Gazzara dies in NY
Feb 3 10:47 PM US/Eastern

NEW YORK (AP) - Broadway, film and television actor Ben Gazzara has died in New York City at age 81. His powerful dramatic performances brought an intensity to a variety of roles including Brick Pollitt in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof."

Longtime family friend Suzanne Mados says Gazzara died Friday in Manhattan.

Gazzara was a proponent of method acting, taking on the thoughts and emotions of his characters. That helped him achieve stardom with two stirring Broadway performances.

In 1955 he originated the role of the failed football star in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." He later played drug addict Johnny Pope in "A Hatful of Rain" and earned a Tony Award nomination.

In 1965 he moved on to TV stardom in "Run for Your Life," a drama about a lawyer with a terminal illness.
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-12, 01:39 AM   #120
DVD Talk Hall of Fame
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Formerly known as (ahem) "LASERMOVIES"/California
Posts: 9,464
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Just learned Dimita Arliss recently died who was in one of my favorite movies the Sting. Which reminds me I wish it would get released on blu-ray one of these days since I sold off my DVD and HD-DVD copies.

Quote:
Dimitra Arliss; actress played killer in ‘The Sting’
January 30, 2012

LOS ANGELES - Dimitra Arliss, who played a hired killer alongside Robert Redford and Paul Newman in the caper comedy “The Sting,’’ has died in Los Angeles. She was 79.

Jaime Larkin, a spokeswoman for the Motion Picture and Television Fund Hospital, said Ms. Arliss died Thursday at the Woodland Hills facility of complications from a stroke.

The Ohio native began her acting career at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago.

On Broadway, Ms. Arliss starred with Stacy Keach in “Indians,’’ and with Kevin Kline and John Malkovich in “Arms and the Man.’’

After appearing as a hit woman in the 1973 hit “The Sting,’’ she had roles in “Xanadu,’’ starring Olivia Newton-John and Gene Kelly, and in Clint Eastwood’s “Firefox.’’

Her numerous television credits include “Dallas,’’ “Quincy M.E.,’’ and “Rich Man, Poor Man.’’
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-12, 08:33 PM   #121
DVD Talk Hero
 
TomOpus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 30,254
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

"Night of the Living Dead" actor Bill Hinzman dies

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Bill Hinzman, who was cast on-the-spot as a zombie in 1968 cult film "Night of the Living Dead" in a role that earned him the longlasting admiration of horror fans, has died at age 75, his daughter said.

Hinzman died of cancer on Sunday evening at his home in Darlington, Pennsylvania, his daughter Heidi Hinzman told Reuters.

He played a prominent role in Director George Romero's low-budget, black-and-white 1968 film "Night of the Living Dead," which is credited with revolutionizing the zombie genre.

Hinzman was working as an assistant cameraman on the film when Romero decided to cast him as the zombie in the movie's opening sequence.

"We'd like to tell the story that it was a hard audition session, but Bill was there and old enough and thin enough and he had an old suit," said the film's producer Russ Streiner.

Dressed in that suit, Hinzman appears at a Pennsylvania cemetery and attacks a pair of young siblings by knocking the man's head against a tombstone and chasing the woman.

He lurches across an open field and eventually chases the woman into a farmhouse.

Fans called Heinzman "No. 1 zombie," said Streiner, who also played a character named Johnny who fought with Hinzman in the cemetery.

"He was a very popular guy, he was very accessible to the fans," Streiner added.

Hinzman also went on to direct and star in the 1980s horror movies "The Majorettes" and "FleshEater."

He will be cremated, as he had asked, said Heidi Hinzman.

"He always joked with me that if he got buried he would come back," she said.


__________________
"Pear Pimples for Hairy Fishnuts!"

My So-Called DVD Life (Profiler),A Fistful of Discs (DVDAf)
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-12, 03:13 PM   #122
DVD Talk Special Edition
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,004
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Roger Boisjoly - Morton Thiokol Engineer



The 1986 explosion that destroyed the space shuttle Challenger and killed seven astronauts shocked the nation, but for one rocket engineer the tragedy became a personal burden and created a lifelong quest to challenge the bureaucratic ethics that had caused the tragedy.

Roger Boisjoly was an engineer at solid rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol and had begun warning as early as 1985 that the joints in the boosters could fail in cold weather, leading to a catastrophic failure of the casing. Then on the eve of the Jan. 28, 1986, launch, Boisjoly and four other space shuttle engineers argued late into the night against the launch....
__________________
"They bought their tickets.....they knew whats they was getting into...

I SAY LET EM CRASH"
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-12, 08:59 AM   #123
DVD Talk Ruler
 
General Zod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Where it all happens - SoCal
Posts: 20,121
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Nello Ferrara:

Candy company executive Nello Ferrara liked to say that he came up with the idea for Lemonheads in 1962 because his newborn son's head was shaped like the yellow fruit.

Ferrara, whose firm also brought the world such popular candies as Atomic Fire Balls, Red Hots and Baked Beans, died Feb. 3 at his home in the Chicago suburb of River Forest, said his son, Salvatore Ferrara. He was 93.

Ferrara Pan Candy Co., the Chicago-based company that he ran for decades, was founded in 1908 by his Italian immigrant father to sell the candy-coated almonds that signify good luck at Italian weddings.

Trained as a lawyer, Ferrara moved into the candy business in the 1950s. Today, the company says it produces 1 million pounds of candy a day.

He came up with the idea for flaming hot Atomic Fire Balls after serving in the military during World War II, Salvatore Ferrara, the company's current president, told the Chicago Sun-Times.

The birth of Ferrara's son was often cited as the inspiration for Lemonheads.

"He always claimed that when I was born, that I came out of my mother sideways," his son said, "and my head was shaped like a lemon."

Born in 1918 in Illinois to Salvatore and Sarah Ferrara, Nello V. Ferrara graduated from Loyola University Chicago and earned a law degree from DePaul University in 1942. He soon joined the Army.

From 1942 to 1946, he was a member of the Counterintelligence Corps and did pretrial work on the Army war crimes tribunal in Japan, according to the Candy Hall of Fame, which inducted him in 1974.

Ferrara also loved to sing, and did so every day — especially when the family dined out, his son said. His repertoire included Italian love songs and his favorite, "Wind Beneath My Wings."

When he was 82, Ferrara credited his energy to candy and said: "I eat an Atomic Fire Ball every day."

Besides his son, Ferrara is survived by Marilyn, his wife of 63 years; two daughters, Serajean and Nella; eight grandchildren; three great-grandchildren, and a sister, Florence.

__________________
"Kneel Before Zod"
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-12, 09:32 AM   #124
DVD Talk Legend
 
Cardsfan111's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 16,250
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by grip View Post
Roger Boisjoly - Morton Thiokol Engineer



The 1986 explosion that destroyed the space shuttle Challenger and killed seven astronauts shocked the nation, but for one rocket engineer the tragedy became a personal burden and created a lifelong quest to challenge the bureaucratic ethics that had caused the tragedy.

Roger Boisjoly was an engineer at solid rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol and had begun warning as early as 1985 that the joints in the boosters could fail in cold weather, leading to a catastrophic failure of the casing. Then on the eve of the Jan. 28, 1986, launch, Boisjoly and four other space shuttle engineers argued late into the night against the launch....
For some reason, I had never heard of him or his story before.
__________________
DVD/BD Spending Tab: 2017; Rank 'Em as You See 'Em: 2017; Challenge Lists; Movie Pass List

"i 'm new here. most of people in here are good. but there is a miserable person. Look into your mirror. Superboy!" --New Member, robert11
  Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-12, 08:57 PM   #125
DVD Talk Ruler
 
General Zod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Where it all happens - SoCal
Posts: 20,121
Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

David Kelly:

Charlie's Grandpa Joe, dead at 82

David Kelly, an Irish actor known for role in "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and "Waking Ned," has died at the age of 82.

The actor reportedly died in the hospital after a short illness, Irish news station RTE reported on February 13.

Kelly played Grandpa Joe, grandfather of Charlie, in the 2005 film "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," starring Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka. Jack Albertson, who played Grandpa Joe in the 1971 film "Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory," died in 1981 at age 74. Leonard Stone, who played Sam Beauregarde, father of Violet, in the movie, died on Nov. 2, 2011.

Kelly earned a Screen Actors Guild nomination in 1998 for his role in "Waking Ned." He is also known in Ireland for his role in the drama mini-series "Strumpet City."

The actor received a lifetime achievement award at the Irish Film and Television Awards in 2005. His final film role was in the 2007 fantasy film "Stardust" co-starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Robert De Niro.

Kelly is survived by his wife Laurie, his son David and daughter Miriam.

__________________
"Kneel Before Zod"
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:56 AM.


Copyright 2011 DVDTalk.com All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.2.0