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Old 12-27-16, 11:39 AM   -   Wikipost
DVD Talk Forum Thread Wiki: Zod's feelgood obituary thread
Please read: This is a community-maintained wiki post containing the most important information from this thread. You may edit the Wiki once you have been a member for 90 days and have made 90 posts.
 
Last edit by: General Zod
This is a place to post death notices/obituaries for lesser-known individuals who probably wouldn't be worthy of an individual thread.

The "feel good" aspect is giving honor to these folks who might fly under the radar, so to speak.

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Old 06-23-10, 01:00 PM   #76
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/us_...a/10389200.stm

Quote:
A 91-year-old who said she was the nurse photographed being kissed in Times Square in New York at the end of World War II has died.



Edith Shain said she was grabbed and kissed by an unknown American soldier on 14 August 1945.

The picture by Alfred Eisenstaedt was taken as people celebrated Japan's surrender, and it became an iconic image.

The identity of the sailor remains disputed.

Ms Shain died at her home in Los Angeles on Sunday, her family said.
'Marvellous feeling'

The identity of the nurse in the photograph was not known until the late 1970s when Ms Shain wrote to the photographer saying that she was the woman in the picture.

However, Eisenstaedt, who died in 1995, said he was never sure who the woman in the picture was.

Recalling the famous kiss, she said she could not identify the man.

"I went from hospital to Times Square that day because the war was over, and where else does a New Yorker go?

"And this guy grabbed me and we kissed, and then I turned one way and he turned the other."

Ms Shain returned to the scene of the kiss at the head of a group of WWII veterans during the New York Veterans Day parade in 2008.

She then said it was thrilling to be back in New York and "see the street where we had been when World War II was over, when that marvellous feeling was flooding the nation".
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Old 06-23-10, 04:48 PM   #77
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by LASERMOVIES View Post
"And this guy grabbed me and we kissed, and then I turned one way and he turned the other."
If you did that today, you'd be charged with sexual assault and have to register as a sex offender for the rest of your life.
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Old 06-24-10, 06:16 AM   #78
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by Quatermass View Post
If you did that today, you'd be charged with sexual assault and have to register as a sex offender for the rest of your life.
Maybe you would be, but a sailor returning home from combat would be winked at.
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Old 09-12-10, 10:59 PM   #79
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Saw this obit a couple of weeks ago and thought it was a terrific story:



http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/20/wo.../20millin.html

Quote:
Bill Millin, Scottish D-Day Piper, Dies at 88

LONDON — Bill Millin, a Scottish bagpiper who played highland tunes as his fellow commandos landed on a Normandy beach on D-Day and lived to see his bravado immortalized in the 1962 film “The Longest Day,” died on Wednesday in a hospital in the western England county of Devon. He was 88.

The cause was complications from a stroke, his family said.

Mr. Millin was a 21-year-old private in Britain’s First Special Service Brigade when his unit landed on the strip of coast the Allies code-named Sword Beach, near the French city of Caen at the eastern end of the invasion front chosen by the Allies for the landings on June 6, 1944.

By one estimate, about 4,400 Allied troops died in the first 24 hours of the landings, about two-thirds of them Americans.

The young piper was approached shortly before the landings by the brigade’s commanding officer, Brig. Simon Fraser, who as the 15th Lord Lovat was the hereditary chief of the Clan Fraser and one of Scotland’s most celebrated aristocrats. Against orders from World War I that forbade playing bagpipes on the battlefield because of the high risk of attracting enemy fire, Lord Lovat, then 32, asked Private Millin to play on the beachhead to raise morale.

When Private Millin demurred, citing the regulations, he recalled later, Lord Lovat replied: “Ah, but that’s the English War Office. You and I are both Scottish, and that doesn’t apply.”

After wading ashore in waist-high water that he said caused his kilt to float, Private Millin reached the beach, then marched up and down, unarmed, playing the tunes Lord Lovat had requested, including “Highland Laddie” and “Road to the Isles.”

With German troops raking the beach with artillery and machine-gun fire, the young piper played on as his fellow soldiers advanced through smoke and flame on the German positions, or fell on the beach. The scene provided an emotional high point in “The Longest Day.”

In later years Mr. Millin told the BBC he did not regard what he had done as heroic. When Lord Lovat insisted that he play, he said, “I just said ‘O.K.,’ and got on with it.” He added: “I didn’t notice I was being shot at. When you’re young, you do things you wouldn’t dream of doing when you’re older.”

He said he found out later, after meeting Germans who had manned guns above the beach, that they didn’t shoot him “because they thought I was crazy.”

Other British commandos cheered and waved, Mr. Millin recalled, though he said he felt bad as he marched among ranks of wounded soldiers needing medical help. But those who survived the landings offered no reproach.

“I shall never forget hearing the skirl of Bill Millin’s pipes,” one of the commandos, Tom Duncan, said years later. “As well as the pride we felt, it reminded us of home, and why we were fighting there for our lives and those of our loved ones.”


From the beach, Private Millin moved inland with the commandos to relieve British paratroopers who had seized a bridge near the village of Ouistreham that was vital to German attempts to move reinforcements toward the beaches. As the commandos crossed the bridge under German fire, Lord Lovat again asked Private Millin to play his pipes.

In 2008, French bagpipers started a fund to erect a statue of Mr. Millin near the landing site, but the fund remains far short of its $125,000 goal.

Bill Millin was born in Glasgow on July 14, 1922, the son of a policeman, and lived with his family in Canada as a child before returning to Scotland.

After the war, he worked on Lord Lovat’s estate near Inverness, but found the life too quiet and took a job as a piper with a traveling theater company. In the late 1950s, he trained in Glasgow as a psychiatric nurse and eventually settled in Devon, retiring in 1988. He visited the United States several times, lecturing on his D-Day experiences.

In 1954 he married Margaret Mary Dowdel. A widower, he is survived by their son, John.
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Old 10-19-10, 04:05 PM   #80
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Tom Bosley -- Dead at 83

--


Tom Bosley -- who famously played Mr. Cunningham on "Happy Days" -- died this morning at a hospital in Rancho Mirage, CA.

A rep for the Bosleys tells TMZ Tom "died of natural causes or specifically, from a brief battle with lung cancer."

The rep adds, "In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the American Cancer Society."

He was 83 years old.
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Old 10-19-10, 04:22 PM   #81
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
"died of natural causes or specifically, from a brief battle with lung cancer."
What exactly does that mean?
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Old 10-19-10, 05:35 PM   #82
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Edit King View Post
What exactly does that mean?

Per Wiki:

A death by natural causes, as recorded by coroners and on death certificates and associated documents, is one that is primarily attributed to natural agents: usually an illness or an internal malfunction of the body. For example, a person dying from complications from influenza, (an illness) commonly referred to as the flu, or a heart attack (an internal body malfunction) would be listed as having died of natural causes. "Old age" is not a scientifically recognized cause of death[citation needed] ; there is always a more direct cause although it may be unknown in certain cases and could be one of a number of aging-associated diseases.
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Old 10-19-10, 05:46 PM   #83
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

WOW!

I always thought natural causes were well...'natural causes'.

Like parts naturally wearing out. Like from old age or having been born with a bad part (or parts) to begin with.

For one reason or another I never knew natural causes included illness.

Heart attacks for instance, are many times the result of clogged artries which are, (for what it's worth, in my opinion) un-natural due to eating too much garbage. Is a bad diet a natural cause too?

I suppose one could conclude under those definitions that getting hit by a bus if you live in a city or killed by a bear if you live in the woods, could be considered natural causes.

Have I used the term 'natural causes' enough?

(BTW: Thanks for taking time to post that, Chrisedge. I appreciate it. )

-THEEK LEARNED SOMETHING TODAY! (I THINK. )

Last edited by The Edit King; 10-19-10 at 08:07 PM. Reason: Natural Causes.
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Old 10-19-10, 07:10 PM   #84
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Looks like Mr. C is doin' June Cleaver in that big sitcom in the sky tonight.
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Old 10-21-10, 12:36 AM   #85
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Penthouse magazine founder Bob Guccione dies at 79.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_obit_guccione




Look like he died broke. God, that picture look like that caveman Geico commercial.
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Old 10-21-10, 01:42 AM   #86
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Instead of calling this thread 'Zod's feelgood obituary thread', I demand that we change the title to..

"UPDATE: DEAD!"


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Old 10-28-10, 09:15 PM   #87
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Creator of TV cartoon Rocky and Bullwinkle dies

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Old 10-28-10, 10:04 PM   #88
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Fluffy the world's longest snake dies: The world's longest snake Fluffy, a 24-foot python, has died at a zoo in Ohio at the age of 18

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Old 10-29-10, 10:50 AM   #89
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.film.com/features/story/a...es-72/42131397

Actor James MacArthur Dies at 72
He was best known as Danno from the original Hawaii Five-0.

Pamela Sitt, Oct 28, 2010

Actor James MacArthur, best known for his role as "Danno" in the original Hawaii Five-0, has died. He was 72.

MacArthur died in Florida of natural causes, according to his wife.

MacArthur starred in Hawaii Five-0 as Danny "Danno" Williams, the second banana of the police force, from 1968 to 1979. He was the last surviving member of the original cast, and had agreed last month to make a guest appearance on the CBS hit remake.

He also worked in theater and in films, but was a recognizable TV presence, appearing on such shows as Murder, She Wrote, The Love Boat, Fantasy Island and Vega$.

He is survived by his third wife, four children and six grandchildren.
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Old 03-28-11, 08:34 PM   #90
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Harry Coover, creator of Super Glue, dies at 94

KINGSPORT, Tenn. – Harry Wesley Coover Jr., known as the inventor of Super Glue, has died. He was 94.

Coover was working for Tennessee Eastman Company, a division of Eastman Kodak, when an accident helped lead to the popular adhesive being discovered, according to his grandson, Adam Paul of South Carolina. An assistant was distressed that some brand new refractometer prisms were ruined when they were glued together by the substance.

In 1951, Coover and another researcher recognized the potential for the strong adhesive, and it was first sold in 1958, according to the Super Glue Corp.'s website.

Cyanoacrylate, the chemical name for the glue, was first uncovered in 1942 in a search for materials to make clear plastic gun sights for World War II. But the compound stuck to everything, which is why it was rejected by researchers, the website said.

President Barack Obama honored Coover in 2010 with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.

Coover died Saturday at his home in Kingsport, Tenn., his grandson said. He was born in Newark, Del., and received a degree in chemistry from Hobart College in New York before getting a master's degree and Ph.D., from Cornell.

He worked his way up to vice president of the chemical division for development for Eastman Kodak. Coover and the team of chemists he worked with became prolific patent holders, achieving more than 460. The work included polymers, organophosphate chemistry, the gasification of coal and of course, cyanoacrylate.

Coover also had a part in early television history, appearing with Garry Moore for "I've got a Secret." Moore, the show's host, and Coover were hung in the air on bars that were stuck to metal supports with a single drop of his glue during a live television broadcast.

The Industrial Research Institute, for which he served as president in 1982, honored Coover with a gold medal and the U.S. Patent Office inducted him into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Akron, Ohio in 2004.
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Old 03-29-11, 12:45 PM   #91
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Paul Baran - Inventor

Quote:
Paul Baran, who helped build the foundation for the modern Internet by devising a way to transmit information in chunks, has died. He was 84.

He died Saturday at his home in Palo Alto of complications from lung cancer, said his son David.

Paul Baran became one of the pioneers behind "packet switching," which helps a communications network withstand an attack by bundling and dispatching data in small packages, while working on Cold War military research for the Rand Corp. in Santa Monica in the 1960s. The Department of Defense used that concept in 1969 to create the Arpanet, which laid the foundation for the modern Internet.
Thanks to Mr. Baran, we have the Internetz.
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Old 03-29-11, 07:01 PM   #92
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by General Zod View Post
Harry Coover, creator of Super Glue, dies at 94
Too bad he couldn't have stuck around a few years longer.
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Old 04-27-11, 09:17 PM   #93
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

588-2300, deeee-ead.



Empire Carpet Man, Lynn Hauldren, dies at 89.
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Old 04-28-11, 02:41 PM   #94
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://abcnews.go.com/US/teleprompte...ry?id=13460891

The man who helped calm the nervous butterflies in many a public speaker, inventor of the teleprompter Hubert Schlafly Jr., died in Connecticut April 20. He was 91.

Schlafly revolutionized the political and television landscape by allowing public speakers to face the camera and appear as though they were speaking from memory.

The original device created by Schlafly was made up of a motorized scroll of paper inside half a suitcase. The idea was inspired by a Broadway actor named Fred Barton in the 1940s. "I said it was a piece of cake," Schlafly recalled to the Advocate of Stamford in a 2008 story on his reaction to Barton's idea.

The device was first used on the CBS soap opera "The First Hundred Years" in 1950.
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Old 04-28-11, 02:51 PM   #95
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread



Phoebe Snow died
http://www.phoebesnow.com/
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Old 04-28-11, 03:57 PM   #96
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quatermass View Post
http://abcnews.go.com/US/teleprompte...ry?id=13460891

The man who helped calm the nervous butterflies in many a public speaker, inventor of the teleprompter Hubert Schlafly Jr., died in Connecticut April 20. He was 91.

Schlafly revolutionized the political and television landscape by allowing public speakers to face the camera and appear as though they were speaking from memory.

The original device created by Schlafly was made up of a motorized scroll of paper inside half a suitcase. The idea was inspired by a Broadway actor named Fred Barton in the 1940s. "I said it was a piece of cake," Schlafly recalled to the Advocate of Stamford in a 2008 story on his reaction to Barton's idea.

The device was first used on the CBS soap opera "The First Hundred Years" in 1950.
Quote:
Actors on Dragnet never memorized anything. Jack Webb didn't want them to.

One actress told how she was speaking her lines in an episode. Jack Webb stopped her.

"What are you doing? You're not reading your lines!"

"I don't need to read them. I memorized them."

"Well, stop it! Just read your lines!"

She started reading the teleprompter. But her eyes were moving back and forth. Jack Webb stopped her.

"It looks like your reading!"

"You TOLD me to read!"

"Okay, well, just go back to what you were doing!"

Harry Morgan told her that she was the first person on the show to get away with memorizing lines.
http://cinemasmear.blogspot.com/2011/02/dragnet.html



The actress was Veronica Cartwright.
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Old 05-02-11, 01:49 AM   #97
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread



Star Trek actor William Campbell has died, aged 87.

Campbell, who played Klingon warrior Captain Koloth on Star Trek, also teamed up with Elvis Presley in his first film Love Me Tender.

He was married to President John F Kennedy's one-time mistress Judith Campbell Exner.

Campbell made his film debut in The Breaking Point in the early 1950s. He also appeared in Cell 2455 Death Row in 1955, The Naked and the Dead and Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte.



Or course he also played General Trelane (retired).
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Old 05-05-11, 09:51 AM   #98
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

SYDNEY -- Claude Stanley Choules, the last known combat veteran of World War I, has died.

His daughter Daphne Edinger told The Associated Press that British-born Choules -- nicknamed "Chuckles" by comrades -- died in a nursing home Thursday in his adopted home of Australia.

He was 110.

Choules joined the British navy as a teenager and served on the battleship HMS Revenge, from which he watched the 1918 surrender of the German High Seas Fleet.

He later migrated to Australia and served in the military for more than 40 years.

According to the Order of the First World War, a group that tracks veterans, Choules and another Briton, Florence Green, were the last known surviving service members from the conflict. Green served as a waitress in the Women's Royal Air Force.
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Old 05-05-11, 09:59 AM   #99
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Choules witnessed the surrender of the German Imperial Navy at the Firth of Forth in 1918, ten days after the Armistice, and also witnessed the scuttling of the German fleet in Scapa Flow.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Choules

He lived to 110 -- amazing.
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Old 10-27-11, 08:58 PM   #100
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Dennis Ritchie obituary
As co-inventor of Unix and the programming language C, he had a key role in shaping today's computing environment


Martin Campbell-Kelly
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 13 October 2011 17.25 EDT


The American computer scientist Dennis Ritchie, who has died aged 70 after suffering from cancer and heart disease, was one of the co-inventors of the Unix operating system and the C programming language. Unix and C provided the infrastructure software and tools that created much of today's computing environment from the internet to smartphones and so have played a central part in shaping the modern world.

The origins of Unix go back to the 1960s, long before the microchip and personal computers had been invented. The nearest thing to personal computing was the computer utility, a large mainframe machine that was used simultaneously, and at great expense, by a couple of dozen users sitting at typewriter terminals.

By the middle of the decade, the utility appeared to provide the way ahead, and a consortium of General Electric, Bell Labs and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) embarked on a project called Multics (Multiplexed Information and Computing Service). Multics would be the world's largest computer utility, supporting several hundred simultaneous users. Bell Labs was responsible for the operating software.

Ritchie joined the programming division of Bell Labs in 1967. His father, Alistair, had spent a long career there and had co-authored an influential technical book, The Design of Switching Circuits (1951). Dennis was born to Alistair and and his wife, Jean, in the New York suburb of Bronxville and grew up in New Jersey, where Bell Labs had its Murray Hill site. He studied physics and applied maths for a bachelor's degree (1963) and computer science for a PhD (1968) at Harvard University.

Multics was in crisis when he arrived at the research organisation. Indeed, many big software projects were in crisis people were just beginning to learn that writing large programs was horrendously difficult and costly. In 1969, after four years of development, Bell Labs pulled out of the project.

Ritchie and another lead programmer on Multics, Ken Thompson, were left somewhat bereft by the project's demise. Multics had promise, but the operating system was too complex to build. This led them to a rethink. They would build a simpler, smaller system that they would call Unix the name was "a kind of treacherous pun on Multics", Ritchie once explained.

The idea was not immediately appreciated by their managers, and they had to cast around for an obsolete computer on which to develop Unix. The machine had just 16 kilobytes of memory, and this alone was an encouragement to keep things simple. If Multics was the victim of baroque software architecture, then Unix would be pure Bauhaus.

Unix was designed over a few months in 1969, and a prototype was running early in 1970. Their colleagues remained unconvinced. However, by offering to write some text-processing software, Ritchie and Thompson managed to persuade the Bell Labs patent department to acquire a full-size computer and run Unix on it.

They decided to rewrite the operating system entirely for the new machine. The first version of Unix had been written in the computers' native machine code, which was difficult and slow. For the next version, Ritchie invented a language called C, which bridged the gap between machine code and programming languages such as Fortran and Cobol.

More: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology...dennis-ritchie
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