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Old 12-27-16, 11:39 AM   -   Wikipost
DVD Talk Forum Thread Wiki: Zod's feelgood obituary thread
Please read: This is a community-maintained wiki post containing the most important information from this thread. You may edit the Wiki once you have been a member for 90 days and have made 90 posts.
 
Last edit by: General Zod
This is a place to post death notices/obituaries for lesser-known individuals who probably wouldn't be worthy of an individual thread.

The "feel good" aspect is giving honor to these folks who might fly under the radar, so to speak.

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Old 04-16-10, 02:47 PM   #51
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I also think he served the city of Los Angeles very well.

He always stood up for his fellow officers and in return I've never heard any policemen/women on the force speak negatively of him unlike Willie Williams, Bernard Parks, and William Bratton (who also served as chiefs of Los Angeles.) Gates was admired and loved by many civilians and policemen.
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Old 05-03-10, 10:17 PM   #52
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Happened a few weeks ago but worth a mention.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100406/...obit_mankiller

Quote:
Former Cherokee Nation chief Wilma Mankiller dies

Tue Apr 6, 2:58 pm ET
OKLAHOMA CITY – Former Cherokee Nation Chief Wilma Mankiller, one of the nation's most visible American Indian leaders and one of the few women to lead a major tribe, died Tuesday after suffering from cancer and other health problems. She was 64.

Mankiller, whose first taste of federal policy toward Indians came when her family ended up in a housing project after a government relocation project, took Indian issues to the White House and met with three presidents. She earned a reputation for facing conflict head-on.

As the first female chief of the Cherokees, from 1985 to 1995, Mankiller led the tribe in tripling its enrollment, doubling employment and building new health centers and children's programs.

"We feel overwhelmed and lost when we realize she has left us, but we should reflect on what legacy she leaves us," current Cherokee Chief Chad Smith said. "We are better people and a stronger tribal nation because her example of Cherokee leadership, statesmanship, humility, grace, determination and decisiveness."
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Old 05-03-10, 10:28 PM   #53
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Also:

Lynn Redgrave, Actress and Playwright, Dies at 67

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Old 05-13-10, 09:20 AM   #54
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Former Ziegfeld Follies dancer from Norman dies at age 106

Doris Eaton Travis, the last surviving member of the Ziegfeld Follies, made her last public appearance in April in New York City.

FROM STAFF REPORTS Oklahoman
Published: May 12, 2010

NORMAN — Doris Eaton Travis, the last surviving member of the legendary Ziegfeld Follies, died Tuesday at age 106. Travis performed with the famous dance troupe from 1918 to 1920 and went on to star in musical revues, Broadway comedies and silent films. Travis made her final public appearance in April.

Doris Eaton Travis

In a statement released to BroadwayWorld.com, Tom Viola, executive director of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, said, "Since first meeting her at the very young age of 94 in 1998 when she appeared at the 12th Annual Easter Bonnet Competition at the New Amsterdam Theatre, through the 24th annual competition two weeks ago at the Minskoff. ... Doris was simply a delight. She taught us all a little bit about how to celebrate the past and live for today. We will miss her forever.”

In 1936, Travis joined Arthur Murray’s New York dance studio as a tap instructor. She later moved to Detroit where she opened an Arthur Murray studio. Under Travis’ leadership, the franchise grew to include 18 dance studios throughout Michigan. She met her husband Paul Travis in Detroit. They were married 50 years.

Doris and Paul Travis moved to Norman in 1970 to begin a horse breeding operation. She operated their 880-acre ranch until her death. Travis earned her college degree from the University of Oklahoma at age 88. She wrote about her life and family in a 2003 book titled "The Days We Danced: The Story of My Theatrical Family.”

Read more: http://www.newsok.com/feed/former-zi...#ixzz0nopfrkFT
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Old 05-13-10, 01:17 PM   #55
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Son of the late Dana Plato commits suicide

http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/TV/0...ion=cnn_latest

Quote:
First Joni Richardson endured the death of her daughter-in-law, Diff'rent Strokes star Dana Plato, in 1999. Now almost exactly 11 years later, Plato's son, Tyler Lambert, committed suicide at the age of 25.

"It's a shame that such a talented human being would do this with his life," Richardson told PEOPLE. "He had all the opportunities in the world and we just can't understand it."

According to Richardson, her grandson, a cameraman and amateur songwriter, had long struggled with his mother's premature death at age 36.

Plato died of a prescription pill overdose on May 8, 1999. It was around the time of Mother's Day, Richardson notes, making the anniversary that much harder.

Lambert died of a gunshot wound to the head on May 6. At the time, Richardson claims, he had been experimenting with drugs and alcohol, a factor she believes contributed directly to his death.

"He was talking so sweet to me on the phone that morning," she said. "But you never can tell what's in their mind."

She added that Lambert's body is being cremated, and there will be no memorial.

"Our lives have just been wrapped around him," Richardson said. "It's just devastating."
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Old 05-17-10, 10:37 PM   #56
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/16/bu...16lamotta.html

Quote:
Richard LaMotta, Creator of Chipwich Ice Cream Sandwich, Dies at 67
By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: May 15, 2010

Richard LaMotta, who turned his childhood passion for dunking cookies in milk into the Chipwich — two chocolate chip cookies embracing a chunk of vanilla ice cream dotted with chocolate chips — died Tuesday at his home in Chappaqua, N.Y. He was 67.

The cause was a heart attack, his daughter Kayla said.


On May 1, 1982, Mr. LaMotta dispatched 60 street-cart vendors, each wearing pith helmets and khakis, to the streets of Manhattan to begin selling his 4 1/2-ounce concoction (including 3 1/2 ounces of ice cream) for what at the time was a pricey $1 each. A few hours later, all 25,000 Chipwiches had been gobbled — the start of something big.

Within two weeks, Mr. LaMotta was selling 40,000 a day, and by the middle of that summer, the Chipwich plants in Queens, N.Y., and Lodi, N.J., were turning out 200,000 a day. It didn’t hurt that Mayor Edward I. Koch posed for a photo — for no fee — as he bit into a Chipwich.

Soon there were imitators, banking on the legal position that they could make a Chipwich-like product, using similar ingredients, as long as they called it something else; among them were Chilly Chips and Chips ’n’ Chips.

“That’s the way it works,” a competitor told The New York Times. “One guy comes up with a good idea, and everybody rips him off. It’s the American way.”

Still, Mr. LaMotta did well. By the time he sold his company to Coolbrands International, a Canadian distributor, in 2002, more than a billion Chipwiches had been sold by approximately 3,700 vendors in 36 markets. The brand was eventually bought by Nestlé, which stopped making the product because it competed with its own version, Ms. LaMotta said.

Richard Edmund LaMotta was born in Brooklyn on May 20, 1942, one of two children of Joseph and Mary Gibbons LaMotta. His father was a butcher. (His cousin was the middleweight boxing champion Jake LaMotta.)

Mr. LaMotta’s first marriage, to Rosemary Tadlock, ended in divorce. In addition to his daughter Kayla, he is survived by his second wife, the former Elaine Nadel; another daughter, Marika; a son from his first marriage, Thomas; and a granddaughter.

Though he first dipped cookies as a toddler, it took nearly four decades before Mr. LaMotta found his true calling. For 12 years, while studying at night for a bachelor’s degree in economics at Brooklyn College, he had worked as a video and sound engineer for AT&T and CBS. In 1975 he earned a law degree from New York Law School. Instead of practicing law, he went into what would eventually be a series of businesses, including one that sold food through catalogs and another that created a digital printing system for converting photographs into oil paintings.

But in the late 1970s a friend in need of financial support asked Mr. LaMotta to become a partner in the Sweet Tooth, an ice cream parlor in Englewood, N.J. There, and in the basement of his father’s home in Brooklyn, he began experimenting with ingredients for a perfect marriage between cookies and ice cream that would keep the cookies from getting soggy during the freezing process. It took a lot of taste-testing for Mr. LaMotta, a somewhat rotund man at the time.

Although the ice cream parlor eventually went out of business, Mr. LaMotta was able to raise about $500,000 from friends to start Chipwich Inc. In 1981, as sales started climbing, he told The Times that he could not foresee selling the company.

“I have devoted 20 pounds of my life to Chipwiches,” he said.


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Old 05-20-10, 11:02 PM   #57
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

John Shepherd-Barron has made his last withdrawal...

Inventor of ATM, John Shepherd-Barron, dies
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Old 05-22-10, 06:10 PM   #58
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Dorothy Kamenshek, ‘League of Their Own’ Figure, Dies at 84

Dorothy Kamenshek, a star player in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League who helped inspire the lead character in the movie “A League of Their Own,” has died. She was 84.

She died of natural causes Monday at her home in Palm Desert, Calif., said the Riverside County coroner’s office.

Kamenshek played for the Rockford (Ill.) Peaches from 1943 to 1951 and again in 1953. She played first base and was named among the top 100 female athletes of the century by Sports Illustrated, partly for winning batting titles in 1946 and 1947. She was selected to seven All-Star teams, and retired in 1953.

She went by her nicknames, Kammie and Dottie, and was one of the players who formed the basis for the composite character Dottie Hinson in the 1992 movie “A League of Their Own,” the Penny Marshall-directed film about women’s professional baseball in the 1940s and 1950s.

In the movie, Dottie, played by Geena Davis, is a crackerjack catcher and a dependable hitter who is so beautiful that she winds up on the cover of Life magazine. The players association has said that the movie’s characters, who played for a team called the Peaches, did not necessarily depict any one player.
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Old 05-24-10, 09:09 AM   #59
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Martin Gardner

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...052304271.html

Excerpt:

By Emma Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 24, 2010; 8:52 AM

Martin Gardner, 95, a journalist whose omnivorous curiosity gave rise to wide-ranging writings that popularized mathematics, explored theology and philosophy, debunked pseudoscience and provided in-depth analysis of Lewis Carroll's Cheshire Cat, died May 22 at a hospital in Norman, Okla.

His son, James Gardner, said the exact cause of death was not known.

A native of Tulsa, Okla., Mr. Gardner was writing stories and poems for a children's magazine in the 1950s when he submitted an article about hexaflexagons -- pieces of paper folded intricately to resemble, Mr. Gardner once said, "a budding flower" -- to Scientific American. Then-editor Dennis Flanagan was so taken with the piece that he hired Mr. Gardner to produce a regular column on recreational mathematics.

The resulting monthly feature, "Mathematical Games," ran from 1956 until 1981. It became one of Scientific American's most popular items, capturing the imagination of amateur and professional mathematicians and introducing a generation of young readers to the pleasures of problem-solving.

The sharp-witted column, packed with cultural references, humor and accessible logic puzzles instead of academic jargon, featured the mathematical concepts behind fractals, Chinese tangram puzzles, and the art of surrealist M.C. Escher. Widely read around the world, "Mathematical Games" made Mr. Gardner -- who never took a math class after high school -- the beloved grandfather of recreational mathematics and the inspiration for countless young people to consider careers in math and science.

"Beyond calculus, I am lost," he once told a reporter. "That was the secret of my column's success. It took me so long to understand what I was writing about that I knew how to write in a way most readers would understand."

"To Martin Gardner," three prominent mathematicians wrote in their dedication of a 1982 book of puzzles, "who brought more math to more millions than anyone else."

Math puzzles were just one part of the sprawling career Mr. Gardner built out of his efforts to examine the world.

In 1952, he published his first of more than 70 books, "Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science." Deemed "unputdownable" by Washington Post critic Michael Dirda, the book heralded a lifelong passion for discrediting scientific fraud and quackery. With a mix of humor and calm logic, Mr. Gardner took on and exposed flat-earth theorists, flying saucers, the spoon-bending psychic Uri Geller and believers in extrasensory perception.

In 1976, he joined with Carl Sagan, Isaac Asimov and others in founding the Committee for the Scientific Evaluation of Claims of the Paranormal to encourage the rational investigation of everything from homeopathic remedies to fortune tellers. He later wrote a monthly column, "Notes of a Fringe Watcher," for the journal Skeptical Inquirer.
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Old 05-24-10, 09:27 AM   #60
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by Quatermass View Post
Martin Gardner

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...052304271.html

Excerpt:

By Emma Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 24, 2010; 8:52 AM

Martin Gardner, 95, a journalist whose omnivorous curiosity gave rise to wide-ranging writings that popularized mathematics, explored theology and philosophy, debunked pseudoscience and provided in-depth analysis of Lewis Carroll's Cheshire Cat, died May 22 at a hospital in Norman, Okla.

His son, James Gardner, said the exact cause of death was not known.

A native of Tulsa, Okla., Mr. Gardner was writing stories and poems for a children's magazine in the 1950s when he submitted an article about hexaflexagons -- pieces of paper folded intricately to resemble, Mr. Gardner once said, "a budding flower" -- to Scientific American. Then-editor Dennis Flanagan was so taken with the piece that he hired Mr. Gardner to produce a regular column on recreational mathematics.

The resulting monthly feature, "Mathematical Games," ran from 1956 until 1981. It became one of Scientific American's most popular items, capturing the imagination of amateur and professional mathematicians and introducing a generation of young readers to the pleasures of problem-solving.

The sharp-witted column, packed with cultural references, humor and accessible logic puzzles instead of academic jargon, featured the mathematical concepts behind fractals, Chinese tangram puzzles, and the art of surrealist M.C. Escher. Widely read around the wosrld, "Mathematical Games" made Mr. Gardner -- who never took a math class after high school -- the beloved grandfather of recreational mathematics and the inspiration for countless young people to consider careers in math and science.

"Beyond calculus, I am lost," he once told a reporter. "That was the secret of my column's success. It took me so long to understand what I was writing about that I knew how to write in a way most readers would understand."

"To Martin Gardner," three prominent mathematicians wrote in their dedication of a 1982 book of puzzles, "who brought more math to more millions than anyone else."

Math puzzles were just one part of the sprawling career Mr. Gardner built out of his efforts to examine the world.

In 1952, he published his first of more than 70 books, "Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science." Deemed "unputdownable" by Washington Post critic Michael Dirda, the book heralded a lifelong passion for discrediting scientific fraud and quackery. With a mix of humor and calm logic, Mr. Gardner took on and exposed flat-earth theorists, flying saucers, the spoon-bending psychic Uri Geller and believers in extrasensory perception.

In 1976, he joined with Carl Sagan, Isaac Asimov and others in founding the Committee for the Scientific Evaluation of Claims of the Paranormal to encourage the rational investigation of everything from homeopathic remedies to fortune tellers. He later wrote a monthly column, "Notes of a Fringe Watcher," for the journal Skeptical Inquirer.
I do believe that it was Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims Of the Paranormal.

Used to always read "Mathematical Games."

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Old 05-26-10, 03:03 PM   #61
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,1855037.story

Quote:
Art Linkletter, host of 'People Are Funny' and 'House Party,' dies at LA home, son-in-law says

LYNN ELBER

AP Entertainment Writer

2:54 PM CDT, May 26, 2010

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Art Linkletter, whose "People Are Funny" and "House Party" shows entertained millions of TV viewers in the 1950s and '60s with the funny side of ordinary folks and who remained active as a writer and speaker through his ninth decade, died Wednesday. He was 97.

Linkletter died at his home in the Bel-Air section of Los Angeles, said his son-in-law, Art Hershey, the husband of Sharon Linkletter.

"He lived a long, full, pure life, and the Lord had need for him," Hershey said.

Linkletter had been ill "in the last few weeks time, but bear in mind he was 97 years old. He wasn't eating well, and the aging process took him," Hershey said.

Linkletter hadn't been diagnosed with any life-threatening disease, he said.

Linkletter was known on TV for his funny interviews with children and ordinary folks. He also collected their comments in a number of best-selling books.

"Art Linkletter's House Party," one of television's longest-running variety shows, debuted on radio in 1944 and was seen on CBS-TV from 1952 to 1969.

Though it had many features, the best known was the daily interviews with schoolchildren.

"On 'House Party' I would talk to you and bring out the fact that you had been letting your boss beat you at golf over a period of months as part of your campaign to get a raise," Linkletter wrote.

"All the while, without your knowledge, your boss would be sitting a few feet away listening, and at the appropriate moment, I would bring you together," he said. "Now, that's funny, because the laugh arises out of a real situation."

Linkletter collected quotes from children into "Kids Say The Darndest Things," and it sold in the millions. The book "70 Years of Best Sellers 1895-1965" ranked "Kids Say the Darndest Things" as the 15th top seller among nonfiction books in that period.

The prime time "People Are Funny," which began on radio in 1942 and ran on TV from 1954 to 1961, emphasized slapstick humor and audience participation — things like throwing a pie in the face of a contestant who couldn't tell his Social Security number in five seconds, or asking him to go out and cash a check written on the side of a watermelon.

The down-to-earth charm of Linkletter's broadcast persona seemed to be mirrored by his private life with his wife of more than a half-century, Lois. They had five children, whom he wrote about in his books and called the "Links."

But in 1969, his 20-year-old daughter Diane jumped to her death from her sixth-floor Hollywood apartment. He blamed her death on LSD use, but toxicology tests found no LSD in her body after she died.

Still, the tragedy prompted Linkletter to become a crusader against drugs. A son, Robert, died in a car accident in 1980. Another son, Jack Linkletter, was 70 when he died of lymphoma in 2007.

Art Linkletter got his first taste of broadcasting with a part-time job while attending San Diego State College in the early 1930s. He graduated in 1934.

"I was studying to be an English professor," Linkletter once said. "But as they say, life is what happens to you while you're making other plans."

He held a series of radio and promotion jobs in California and Texas, experimenting with audience participation and remote broadcasts, before forming his own production company in the 1940s and striking it big with "People Are Funny" and "House Party."

Linkletter was born Arthur Gordon Kelly on July 17, 1912, in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. His unwed mother put him up for adoption when he was a baby; when he was about 7, he and his adoptive parents moved to the U.S., eventually settling in San Diego.

He recalled his preacher-father forced him to take odd jobs to help the family. So Linkletter left and became a hobo, hopping trains across the West, working where he could. He recalled later that he felt the religious faith instilled by his father had been a great gift.

After leaving daily broadcasting in 1969, Linkletter continued to write, lecture and appear in television commercials.

Among his other books, were "Old Age is Not for Sissies," ''How To Be a Supersalesman," ''Confessions of a Happy Man," ''Hobo on the Way to Heaven" and his autobiography, "I Didn't Do It Alone."

A recording Linkletter made with his daughter Diane not long before she died, "We Love You, Call Collect," was issued after her death and won a Grammy award for best spoken word recording.

"Life is not fair ... not easy," Linkletter said in a 1990 interview by The Associated Press. "Outside, peer pressure can wreak havoc with the nicest families. So that's the part that's a gamble.

"But I'm an optimist. Even though I've had tragedies in my life, and I've seen a lot of difficult things, I still am an optimist," he said.

Linkletter had extensive business interests. He headed a company involved in real estate development and management and operation of cattle ranches in Montana, New Mexico and California. He held interests in oil and gas wells, owned livestock in Australia and was involved in a solar energy firm.

He is survived by his wife, Lois, whom he married in 1935, and daughters Dawn Griffin and Sharon Linkletter, as well as seven grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.
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Old 05-26-10, 03:10 PM   #62
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Contour Chairs will be at 1/2 mast all around the country
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Old 05-26-10, 03:53 PM   #63
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
"But I'm an optimist. Even though I've had tragedies in my life, and I've seen a lot of difficult things, I still am an optimist," he said.
Must be a sad feeling to be mid 90 and one of your children passes away at 70. He certainly had a full and engaging life. He was an American institution.



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Old 05-26-10, 04:12 PM   #64
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Fun fact: His daughter lived next door to a family friend, we were visiting him when she committed suicide at the age of 20.
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Old 05-26-10, 04:23 PM   #65
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Fun fact: His daughter lived next door to a family friend, we were visiting him when she committed suicide at the age of 20.
That's the darnedest thing.
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Old 05-26-10, 04:35 PM   #66
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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He is survived by his wife, Lois, whom he married in 1935.
Wow.
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Old 05-28-10, 05:06 AM   #67
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

John Finn, Medal of Honor Winner, Dies at 100

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/28/us/28finn.html?src=me

Quote:
John W. Finn, the last survivor of the 15 Navy men who received the Medal of Honor for heroism during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, died Thursday at a nursing home in Chula Vista, Calif. He was 100 and had been the oldest living recipient of the medal, the nation’s highest award for valor.

John W. Finn, with his wife, Alice, was awarded the Medal of Honor during ceremonies at Pearl Harbor in 1942.

His death was announced by J. P. Tremblay, deputy secretary of the California Department of Veterans Affairs.

On the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, when Japanese planes bombed the American battleships in Hawaii, plunging the nation into World War II, numerous acts of valor played out. Most of them took place aboard the stricken ships — in some cases efforts by the wounded and the dying to save their fellow sailors. Amid the death and destruction, Chief Finn, on an airfield runway, was waging a war of his own against the Japanese.

A few minutes before 8 o’clock, Japanese planes attacked the Kaneohe Bay Naval Air Station, about 12 miles from Battleship Row at Ford Island, hoping to knock out three dozen Navy aircraft before they could get aloft.

Mr. Finn, the chief petty officer in charge of munitions at the naval station and a veteran of 15 years in the Navy, was in bed in a nearby apartment with his wife, Alice. He heard the sound of aircraft, saw one plane flash past his window, then another, and he heard machine guns.

He dressed hurriedly, and drove to the naval station. At first, he observed the base’s 20 miles-per-hour speed limit. But then, “I heard a plane come roaring in from astern of me,” he recalled decades later in an interview with Larry Smith for “Beyond Glory,” an oral history of Medal of Honor recipients.

“As I glanced up, the guy made a wing-over, and I saw that big old red meatball, the rising sun insignia, on the underside of the wing. Well, I threw it into second and it’s a wonder I didn’t run over every sailor in the air station.”

When Chief Finn arrived at the hangars, many of the planes had already been hit. He recalled that he grabbed a .30-caliber machine gun on a makeshift tripod, carried it to an exposed area near a runway and began firing. For the next two and a half hours, he blazed away, although peppered by shrapnel as the Japanese planes strafed the runways with cannon fire.

As he remembered it: “I got shot in the left arm and shot in the left foot, broke the bone. I had shrapnel blows in my chest and belly and right elbow and right thumb. Some were just scratches. My scalp got cut, and everybody thought I was dying: Oh, Christ, the old chief had the top of his head knocked off! I had 28, 29 holes in me that were bleeding. I was walking around on one heel. I was barefooted on that coral dust. My left arm didn’t work. It was just a big ball hanging down.”

Chief Finn thought he had hit at least one plane, but he did not know whether he had brought it down. When the attack ended, he received first aid, then returned to await a possible second attack. He was hospitalized the following afternoon.

On Sept. 15, 1942, Chief Finn received the Medal of Honor from Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet, in a ceremony aboard the carrier Enterprise at Pearl Harbor. Admiral Nimitz cited Chief Finn for his “magnificent courage in the face of almost certain death.”

John William Finn was born on July 23, 1909, in Los Angeles County, the son of a plumber. He dropped out of school to join the Navy at age 17.

He served stateside after he recovered from his Pearl Harbor wounds, became a lieutenant in 1944 and remained in military service after the war. He had been living on a cattle ranch in Pine Valley, Calif., about 45 miles east of San Diego, before entering the nursing home where he died.

His survivors include a son, Joseph. His wife died in 1998.

Ten of the 15 servicemen who received the Medal of Honor for their actions at Pearl Harbor died in the attack. Among them were Rear Adm. Isaac C. Kidd, commander of Battleship Division 1, who was aboard the Arizona when it blew up and sank; Capt. Franklin Van Valkenburgh, commander of the Arizona; and Capt. Mervyn S. Bennion, commander of the battleship West Virginia.

Four of the Pearl Harbor medal recipients survived the war. Cmdr. Cassin Young, awarded the medal for reboarding and saving his repair ship, the Vestal, after being blown into the water, died in November 1942 in the battle for Guadalcanal.

In 1999, Mr. Finn was among Pearl Harbor veterans invited to Hawaii for the premiere of the Hollywood movie “Pearl Harbor.” “It was a damned good movie,” he told The Boston Herald in 2001. “It’s helped educate people who didn’t know about Pearl Harbor and what happened there.”

“I liked it especially,” he said, “because I got to kiss all those pretty little movie actresses.”
I love that last line.

Last edited by Fist of Doom; 05-28-10 at 05:08 AM.
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Old 05-30-10, 03:08 PM   #68
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by Quatermass View Post
Martin Gardner

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...052304271.html

Excerpt:

By Emma Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, May 24, 2010; 8:52 AM

Martin Gardner, 95, a journalist whose omnivorous curiosity gave rise to wide-ranging writings that popularized mathematics, explored theology and philosophy, debunked pseudoscience and provided in-depth analysis of Lewis Carroll's Cheshire Cat, died May 22 at a hospital in Norman, Okla.

His son, James Gardner, said the exact cause of death was not known.

A native of Tulsa, Okla., Mr. Gardner was writing stories and poems for a children's magazine in the 1950s when he submitted an article about hexaflexagons -- pieces of paper folded intricately to resemble, Mr. Gardner once said, "a budding flower" -- to Scientific American. Then-editor Dennis Flanagan was so taken with the piece that he hired Mr. Gardner to produce a regular column on recreational mathematics.

The resulting monthly feature, "Mathematical Games," ran from 1956 until 1981. It became one of Scientific American's most popular items, capturing the imagination of amateur and professional mathematicians and introducing a generation of young readers to the pleasures of problem-solving.

The sharp-witted column, packed with cultural references, humor and accessible logic puzzles instead of academic jargon, featured the mathematical concepts behind fractals, Chinese tangram puzzles, and the art of surrealist M.C. Escher. Widely read around the world, "Mathematical Games" made Mr. Gardner -- who never took a math class after high school -- the beloved grandfather of recreational mathematics and the inspiration for countless young people to consider careers in math and science.

"Beyond calculus, I am lost," he once told a reporter. "That was the secret of my column's success. It took me so long to understand what I was writing about that I knew how to write in a way most readers would understand."

"To Martin Gardner," three prominent mathematicians wrote in their dedication of a 1982 book of puzzles, "who brought more math to more millions than anyone else."

Math puzzles were just one part of the sprawling career Mr. Gardner built out of his efforts to examine the world.

In 1952, he published his first of more than 70 books, "Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science." Deemed "unputdownable" by Washington Post critic Michael Dirda, the book heralded a lifelong passion for discrediting scientific fraud and quackery. With a mix of humor and calm logic, Mr. Gardner took on and exposed flat-earth theorists, flying saucers, the spoon-bending psychic Uri Geller and believers in extrasensory perception.

In 1976, he joined with Carl Sagan, Isaac Asimov and others in founding the Committee for the Scientific Evaluation of Claims of the Paranormal to encourage the rational investigation of everything from homeopathic remedies to fortune tellers. He later wrote a monthly column, "Notes of a Fringe Watcher," for the journal Skeptical Inquirer.
The story is that in the 1970s, the computers at MIT got bogged down on the same day each month. It turned out that that was the day Scientific American was delivered. The computers were overloaded because students were working out the problems in Gardner's column.
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Old 06-01-10, 11:50 AM   #69
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Chris Haney

---

Chris Haney, a co-creator of the popular Trivial Pursuit board game, has died at the age of 59.

Scott Abbott, who created Trivial Pursuit with Haney, said Haney died Monday in a Toronto hospital after a long illness.

Haney worked for The Canadian Press and the Montreal Gazette newspaper as a photo editor before going into the board game business.

He teamed up with Canadian Press sports reporter Scott Abbott in 1979 to invent Trivial Pursuit.

Abbott said he and Haney always had a "blind faith" that the game would be successful if it got to market. Released in 1982, it took off after a slow start and the duo sold the rights to toy giant Hasbro in 2008 for US$80 million.

Haney is survived by his wife and three grown children.
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Old 06-01-10, 12:17 PM   #70
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I heard his ashes were divided up into 6 pie pieces.
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Old 06-01-10, 12:19 PM   #71
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread



Chris Haney
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Old 06-03-10, 09:39 PM   #72
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Rue McClanahan

Rue McClanahan, who helped make “The Golden Girls” a long-running television hit playing the saucy, man-devouring Southern belle Blanche Devereaux (in one scene she made a date at her husband’s funeral), died Thursday in Manhattan. Unlike Blanche, she had no trouble admitting her age, 76.



---

Miss Ellie

She was known and will be remembered for her bug-eyed stare, crooked tongue and messy mane.

Miss Ellie — who was crowned the world's ugliest dog in 2009 — has died at the age of 17 in her Tennessee home.

"It was not unexpected even though she had been doing well," owner Dawn Goehring told the Mountain Press newspaper.

The Chinese Crested Hairless dog was rescued by Ms Goehring from an owner who no longer wanted her and went on to become a successful dog model who raised money for animal shelters.

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Old 06-04-10, 12:24 PM   #73
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by General Zod View Post
Rue McClanahan

Rue McClanahan, who helped make “The Golden Girls” a long-running television hit playing the saucy, man-devouring Southern belle Blanche Devereaux (in one scene she made a date at her husband’s funeral), died Thursday in Manhattan. Unlike Blanche, she had no trouble admitting her age, 76.


---

Miss Ellie

She was known and will be remembered for her bug-eyed stare, crooked tongue and messy mane.

Miss Ellie — who was crowned the world's ugliest dog in 2009 — has died at the age of 17 in her Tennessee home.

"It was not unexpected even though she had been doing well," owner Dawn Goehring told the Mountain Press newspaper.

The Chinese Crested Hairless dog was rescued by Ms Goehring from an owner who no longer wanted her and went on to become a successful dog model who raised money for animal shelters.
I'll miss that ugly old bitch.

Spoiler:
Naaah...just too easy
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Old 06-04-10, 12:43 PM   #74
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by crazyronin View Post
I do believe that it was Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims Of the Paranormal.

Used to always read "Mathematical Games."

Would have been better if it was panel instead of committee.
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Old 06-18-10, 06:34 PM   #75
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Jose Saramago, Nobel-Winning Novelist, Dies At 87



Quote:
Jose Saramago, the first Portuguese writer awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, died at his home in the Canary Islands on Friday. He was honored in his homeland as a major cultural figure, but as a committed Communist, he attracted his share of controversy as well. Saramago moved to the Canary Islands in 1998 after a very public dispute with the Portuguese government.

Saramago's 1982 novel, Baltasar and Blimunda, was the first to be widely translated, and his work began attracting international attention. In 1998, he became the first Portuguese writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. At a banquet in Oslo celebrating the award, Saramago said he owed a great debt to all those who had written in Portuguese.

"The ones of the past and of today, I am but one of them," he said.

Saramago is known for his imaginative blend of fantasy, fact and folklore. He takes on big subjects and big themes: In The Stone Raft he envisions a world in which Spain and Portugal are literally cut off from the rest of Europe. In Blindness, which was also made into a movie, the entire population of a city loses its sight.

"It's not a 'Once upon a time,' but 'What if?' " Macedo says. "What if suddenly the world became blind? What if the Iberian Peninsula was geographically separated from Europe? He writes fables in a sense."

Not surprisingly, Saramago attracted his share of controversy. In 1991, his novel The Gospel According to Jesus Christ, which depicts a very flawed, human Jesus, was condemned by the Catholic Church. The next year, the Portuguese government withdrew it from competition for a literary prize. Saramago accused the government of censorship and moved to the Canary Islands.
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