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Old 12-27-16, 11:39 AM   -   Wikipost
DVD Talk Forum Thread Wiki: Zod's feelgood obituary thread
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This is a place to post death notices/obituaries for lesser-known individuals who probably wouldn't be worthy of an individual thread.

The "feel good" aspect is giving honor to these folks who might fly under the radar, so to speak.

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Old 08-27-09, 02:07 PM   #26
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Russian Anthem Writer Mikhalkov Dies

Sergei Mikhalkov, who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet and Russian national anthems, has died at the age 96.

Mikhalkov, an author who was favoured by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin, died in a Moscow hospital on Thursday.

He also fathered two noted film directors, Academy Award winner Nikita Mikhalkov and Oscar-nominated filmmaker Andrei Konchalovsky.

Stalin commissioned the former war correspondent to write lyrics for a new Soviet anthem in 1943, during World War II.

Mikhalkov's lyrics, co-written with journalist El Registan, were and set to music by Alexander Alexandrov, and celebrated the dictator who he wrote, "inspired us to labour and to heroism."

The Russian government scrapped the anthem after the Soviet collapse in 1991, replacing it with an instrumental piece by 19th-century Russian composer Mikhail Glinka. However, when Vladimir Putin became Russian president in 2000, he restored the old anthem and Mikhalkov revised the text.

In 2005, Putin personally handed Mikhalkov a state award for "literary and social achievements".

Mikhalkov received numerous state awards for his children's books, film scripts, plays and fiction, including his 1935 children's poem Uncle Styopa, which is still taught in Russian kindergartens and primary schools.

In addition to his sons, Mikhalkov is survived by his wife Yulia Subbotina, ten grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
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Old 08-27-09, 03:39 PM   #27
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I'll see your Russian and raise you...

Pop songwriter Ellie Greenwich dies in New York
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Songwriter Ellie Greenwich, who helped shape pop music in the 1960s with such memorable tunes as "Chapel of Love" and "Da Doo Ron Ron," died of a heart attack at a New York hospital on Wednesday, her manager said. She was 68.

The Brooklyn-born writer joined forces with producer Phil Spector and her then-husband Jeff Barry to compose elaborately crafted "Wall of Sound" tunes for the likes of the Crystals and the Ronettes, just as the Beatles were about to lead a shift away from outside songwriters.

Working out of New York's famed Brill Building, a haven for singer/songwriters, she also shepherded a young performer named Neil Diamond, producing his early hits "Cherry, Cherry" and "Kentucky Woman."

All told, Greenwich's songs sold tens of millions of copies, and yielded 25 gold and platinum records, according to the Songwriters Hall of Fame, into which she was inducted in 1991.

During 1963 alone, a year after she graduated university with an English degree, the trio hit the top-10 list with such tunes as the Crystals' "Da Doo Ron Ron" and "Then He Kissed Me," and the Ronettes' "Be My Baby." The following year, they hit No. 1 with the Dixie Cups' "Chapel of Love."

Their 1966 collaboration for Ike and Tina Turner, "River Deep, Mountain High" was a relative sales disappointment in the United States, but reached No. 3 on the U.K. charts. Barry and Greenwich also ended their four-year marriage that year.

Greenwich helped create the play "Leader of the Pack," a show about her own life in the music industry that had a run on Broadway in 1985.

In addition to Barry, she is survived by her sister, Laura Weiner and brother-in-law Bob Weiner, who was also her manager.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis; Editing by Dean Goodman and Eric Walsh)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090826/...us_greenwich_1
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Old 09-01-09, 12:39 PM   #28
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Erich Kunzel, Cincinnati Pops director, dies at 74

CINCINNATI – Erich Kunzel, the longtime conductor of the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, has died. He was 74.

Kunzel has been the Cincinnati Pops' conductor since it was established in 1977. He won international fame through sales of more than 10 million recordings and conducting appearances worldwide.

Kunzel was diagnosed with liver, colon and pancreatic cancer in April, but continued conducting while undergoing treatment. An orchestra spokesman says Kunzel died Tuesday morning at a hospital near his home in Swan's Island, Maine.

Besides the Cincinnati Pops, Kunzel had led the National Symphony in nationally televised Memorial Day and July 4 concerts since 1991.

He also had homes in Naples, Fla., and Newport, Ky., and is survived by his wife, Brunhilde.

World's oldest dog dies in NY at 21 — or 147

NEW YORK – A wire-haired dachshund that held the record as the world's oldest dog and celebrated its last birthday with a party at a dog hotel and spa has died at age 21 — or 147 in dog years.

The dog, named Chanel, died Friday of natural causes at her owners' home in suburban Port Jefferson Station, on Long Island.

Chanel, as stylish as her legendary namesake, wore tinted goggles for her cataracts in her later years and favored sweaters because she was sensitive to the cold, owners Denice and Karl Shaughnessy said Monday.

The playful dachshund was only 6 weeks old when Denice Shaughnessy, then serving with the U.S. Army, adopted her from a shelter in Newport News, Va.

Along with her owner, Chanel spent nine years on assignment in Germany, where she became adept at stealing sticks of butter from kitchen countertops and hiding them in sofa cushions in the living room, Shaughnessy said. She also liked chocolate, usually considered toxic to dogs, Shaughnessy said.

"She once ate an entire bag of Reese's peanut butter cups, and, you see, she lived to be 21, so go figure," Shaughnessy added.

Karl Shaughnessy nominated Chanel for the title of world's oldest dog after noticing the Guinness World Records book had no record.

Guinness World Records officials presented Chanel with a certificate as the world's oldest dog at a Manhattan birthday bash hosted by a private pet food company in May.

Chanel loved the party, especially the cake, which had a peanut butter flavor and had been made for dogs, Denice Shaughnessy said.

Chanel exercised daily and ate home-cooked chicken with her dog food, but good care wasn't entirely responsible for her long life, said her owners, who attributed God.

"Dogs are God's angels sent here to look out for us," Denice Shaughnessy said.

A dog from New Iberia, La., named Max, is vying for the record of world's oldest dog. Owner Janelle Derouen said Max marked his 26th birthday on Aug. 9. She said Guinness World Records officials were reviewing documents to authenticate his age; a Guinness World Records official in London didn't immediately answer an e-mail from The Associated Press requesting confirmation of that.

When asked the secret to her dog's long life, Derouen said she was shocked he's still with her.

"I have five kids, and all my kids are grown and gone," she said. "Now my grandkids are playing with this dog."
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Old 09-11-09, 04:10 PM   #29
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

'MASH' writer Larry Gelbart dies at 81

Larry Gelbart, the award-winning comedy writer best known for developing the landmark TV series "MASH," co-writing the book for the hit Broadway musical "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" and co-writing the classic movie comedy "Tootsie," died this morning. He was 81.

More here: http://www.latimes.com/news/obituari...,2812430.story
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Old 09-13-09, 11:32 AM   #30
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6832878.ece

Quote:
Norman Borlaug, scientist who 'saved 245m lives', dies aged 95
September 13, 2009

India paid tribute today to Norman Borlaug, the late American agricultural scientist who won the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize for developing high-yield crops that helped to prevent millions of people from dying of famine across the developing world.

Borlaug, known as the father of the “green revolution” that transformed agriculture in India and many other poor countries in the 1960s, died last night from cancer complications in Dallas, Texas, at the age of 95.

Sharad Pawar, the Indian Minister of Agriculture, said that India and many other nations owed a debt of gratitude to "this outstanding personality” for helping to forge world peace and saving the lives of 245 million people worldwide.

“In the death of Norman Borlaug, the world today has lost not only an eminent agriculture scientist but a man dedicated to the cause of humanity,” he said in a statement.

Mr Pawar said that Borlaug would be “a source of inspiration and sustenance for all of us” as India moved towards a second green revolution designed to breathe new life into its agricultural sector.

The first revolution quadrupled India’s food production through the planting of high-yield grains and turned it from a starving nation into a self-sufficient food exporter.

But Indian agriculture – which supports 60 per cent of the population – has been in decline for several years, growing at a far slower pace than the overall economy, and has been hit this year by the worst drought since 2002.

Manmohan Singh, the Prime Minister, called last month for a second revolution by appealing to Indian scientists to develop new technologies in the same way as Borlaug did.

Borlaug’s groundbreaking work began in 1944, when he was put in charge of a joint project between the Mexican government and the Rockefeller Foundation to try to boost grain production in Mexico.

Within two decades, he had developed a high-yielding, disease-resistant variety of wheat.

He then worked to put such cereal strains into mass production across South America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia, at the same time as pressing governments to introduce farmer-friendly economic policies.

Many experts believe that his efforts averted a widely predicted global famine in the second half of the 20th century and saved up to a billion lives.


A professor of international agriculture at Texas A&M University since 1984, he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian honour of the United States, in 2007.

Borlaug’s children issued a statement saying that they hoped that their father’s life would be “an example to all”.

“We would like his life to be a model for making a difference in the lives of others and to bring about efforts to end human misery for all mankind,” they said.
Borlaug is one of those guys that deserved to be 10 times more famous than he was. He was also one of only five people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.
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Old 09-14-09, 08:13 AM   #31
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Monday, September 14, 2009

Emmy-nominated 'Naked City' actor Paul Burke dies

The Associated Press

Paul Burke, who was twice nominated for an Emmy for his role as Det. Adam Flint in the gritty crime hit "Naked City," died Sunday. He was 83.

Burke, who had leukemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, died with wife Lyn at his side at his home in Palm Springs, family spokeswoman Daniela Ryan said.

Burke was featured in dozens of TV series in his four-decade career, including prominent parts on "12 O'Clock High" and "Dynasty."

In a pair of notable big screen appearances in the late 1960s he played a cop who chased upscale art thief Steve McQueen "The Thomas Crown Affair" and had the leading male role in the tale of young women and Hollywood excess "Valley of the Dolls."

Burke was born in New Orleans in 1926. His father was a boxer, Martin Burke, who had once fought heavyweight champion Gene Tunney.

The family ran a restaurant and nightclub in the city's French Quarter during World War II called Marty Burke's, where Paul Burke spent much of his time before leaving for Southern California to pursue an acting career at 19.

Burke said seeing that seeing the sad characters pass through the club gave him a sense of purpose.

"I stayed up late watching the barflies, the brawlers," he told TV Guide in 1962. "I listened to the stories of wasted lives, I watched the effect of wasted lives. It gave me a strong feeling of urgency about my own life."

He studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse, and after a slew of bit guest spots on television shows, he landed his first starring role in 1956 playing veterinarian Dr. Noah McCann in the short-lived series "Noah's Ark."

Four years later he joined "Naked City" in its second season, when it changed from a half-hour to an hour drama. Burke played the brooding detective Flint on the show famous for its dark, quasi-documentary style. It allowed him to practice his craft with future stars like Robert Duvall and Dustin Hoffman, who made guest appearances.

"Acting is more exciting than living - more electric, more immediate than living," he told TV Guide at the time. "That's because life is full of random elements. In acting, you select, you choose the elements. This selection allows you to get to the essence of the character, the essence of an experience."

Burke would move on to play an Air Force colonel in the adventure show "12 O'Clock High," where he met his actress wife Lyn.

He continued getting steady work into his 60s, including a recurring role in the primetime soap opera "Dynasty" from 1982-1988.

His last part was in the 1990 film "The Fool." He had since retired to Palm Springs.

In addition to his wife, Burke is survived by three children from his first marriage, Paula Burke-Lopez, Paul Brian Burke and Dina Burke-Shawkat.

Funeral plans were pending.
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Old 09-14-09, 08:51 AM   #32
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Gertrude Baines

Gertrude Baines, who lived to be the world's oldest person on a steady diet of crispy bacon, fried chicken and ice cream, died Friday at a nursing home. She was 115.

Baines likely suffered a heart attack but an autopsy will be conducted to confirm the cause of death, said her longtime physician, Dr. Charles Witt.

Born in 1894 in Shellman, Ga., Baines claimed the title of the world's oldest living person when a 115-year-old woman, Maria de Jesus, died in Portugal in January.

The oldest person in the world is now Kama Chinen, 114, who lives in Japan, according to Dr. L. Stephen Coles of the Gerontology Research Group, which tracks claims of extreme old age. Chinen was born May 10, 1895, Coles said.

The oldest person who has ever lived is Jeanne-Louise Calment, according to Coles. She was 122 when she died Aug. 4, 1997 in Arles, France.

Baines outlived her entire family, including her only daughter, who died of typhoid.

Baines worked as a maid in Ohio State University dormitories until her retirement and has lived at the Western Convalescent Hospital in Los Angeles for more than 10 years.

Nurses at Western Convalescent Hospital described Baines as a modest woman who liked to watch the "Jerry Springer Show" and eat fried chicken, bacon and ice cream. She refused to use dentures.

Witt, her physician, said that when he visited Baines earlier this week, she complained only that her bacon was soggy and arthritis was causing pain in her right knee.

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Old 09-14-09, 09:15 AM   #33
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by jfoobar View Post
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Borlaug is one of those guys that deserved to be 10 times more famous than he was. He was also one of only five people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.

Yep. People like Ted Kennedy get remembered ad nauseum for their supposed greatness, and hardly a word about a man who saved millions of lives.
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Old 09-14-09, 11:06 PM   #34
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roybq View Post
Monday, September 14, 2009

Emmy-nominated 'Naked City' actor Paul Burke dies

The Associated Press

Paul Burke, who was twice nominated for an Emmy for his role as Det. Adam Flint in the gritty crime hit "Naked City," died Sunday. He was 83.

Burke, who had leukemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, died with wife Lyn at his side at his home in Palm Springs, family spokeswoman Daniela Ryan said.

Burke was featured in dozens of TV series in his four-decade career, including prominent parts on "12 O'Clock High" and "Dynasty."

In a pair of notable big screen appearances in the late 1960s he played a cop who chased upscale art thief Steve McQueen "The Thomas Crown Affair" and had the leading male role in the tale of young women and Hollywood excess "Valley of the Dolls."

Burke was born in New Orleans in 1926. His father was a boxer, Martin Burke, who had once fought heavyweight champion Gene Tunney.

The family ran a restaurant and nightclub in the city's French Quarter during World War II called Marty Burke's, where Paul Burke spent much of his time before leaving for Southern California to pursue an acting career at 19.

Burke said seeing that seeing the sad characters pass through the club gave him a sense of purpose.

"I stayed up late watching the barflies, the brawlers," he told TV Guide in 1962. "I listened to the stories of wasted lives, I watched the effect of wasted lives. It gave me a strong feeling of urgency about my own life."

He studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse, and after a slew of bit guest spots on television shows, he landed his first starring role in 1956 playing veterinarian Dr. Noah McCann in the short-lived series "Noah's Ark."

Four years later he joined "Naked City" in its second season, when it changed from a half-hour to an hour drama. Burke played the brooding detective Flint on the show famous for its dark, quasi-documentary style. It allowed him to practice his craft with future stars like Robert Duvall and Dustin Hoffman, who made guest appearances.

"Acting is more exciting than living - more electric, more immediate than living," he told TV Guide at the time. "That's because life is full of random elements. In acting, you select, you choose the elements. This selection allows you to get to the essence of the character, the essence of an experience."

Burke would move on to play an Air Force colonel in the adventure show "12 O'Clock High," where he met his actress wife Lyn.

He continued getting steady work into his 60s, including a recurring role in the primetime soap opera "Dynasty" from 1982-1988.

His last part was in the 1990 film "The Fool." He had since retired to Palm Springs.

In addition to his wife, Burke is survived by three children from his first marriage, Paula Burke-Lopez, Paul Brian Burke and Dina Burke-Shawkat.

Funeral plans were pending.

I've only got 2 more episodes of Naked City to watch on DVD. I really enjoyed the show and was surprised to learn earlier this year that he was still living. Great show. Too bad.
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Old 09-27-09, 06:17 PM   #35
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...l?hpid=topnews

Quote:
William Safire, Speechwriter, N.Y. Times Columnist, Was 79
By Patricia Sullivan
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, September 27, 2009; 4:06 PM

William Safire, 79, conservative political columnist and word maven, died today at a hospice in Rockville, Md., reportedly of pancreatic cancer.

Mr. Safire, who won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1978, wrote a semi-weekly political column in the Times from 1973 to 2005, penning an erudite and opinionated series of articles, ultimately creating a body of work that he described as libertarian conservative. he said he "was hired to be a sore thumb" at the famously liberal newspaper. "It's time to leave when you're still hitting the long ball and have something else you want to do," he told the Washington Post at the time, one of many baseball-related metaphors that popped up in his work.

He was equally known for his On Language column, which he began writing in 1979, a delightful look at the origins of words and phrases and their proper usage that engaged readers from all over the U.S. He wrote it until two weeks ago.


Born in New York City, he dropped out of Syracuse University after two years. He returned a generation later to deliver the commencement address and became a university trustee. He was a correspondent in the U.S. Army and a radio, television and newspaper reporter before running a public relations firm in New York. As a PR man, he was responsible for bringing then-Vice President Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev together in the 1959 Moscow kitchen debate.

In 1968, he joined Nixon's presidential campaign and became a senior speechwriter, credited with coining the phrases "nattering nabobs of negativism" and "hysterical hypochondriacs of history" that Vice President Spiro Agnew used to describe the U.S. media.
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Old 10-20-09, 12:32 PM   #36
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Vic Mizzy

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The songwriter who wrote the catchy theme songs to "The Addams Family" and "Green Acres" television shows has died. Vic Mizzy was 93.

His manager Jonathan Wolfson says Mizzy died Saturday at his home in Bel Air. He didn't know the cause of death.

Mizzy got his start in vaudeville and wrote songs that were recorded by Dean Martin, Doris Day, Perry Como and Billie Holiday in the 1940s and 50s.

His hits included "The Whole World Is Singing My Song" and "With a Hey and a Hi and a Ho-Ho-Ho."

Mizzy has said that he didn't mind if people only remember him for the finger snaps at the start of the "The Addams Family" theme song. After all, he said "two snaps got me a mansion in Bel Air."
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Old 10-20-09, 01:25 PM   #37
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

[setup]I hope he didn't suffer for long.[/setup]
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Old 10-20-09, 01:28 PM   #38
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfoobar View Post
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6832878.ece

Borlaug is one of those guys that deserved to be 10 times more famous than he was. He was also one of only five people to have won the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal.
Damnit, I realize I'm a month late on this, but that's terrible news. Borlaug was one of the great ones and deserved to be a household name. Hell, I wouldn't have known about him if he didn't teach at A&M. Simply an amazing man.
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Old 10-21-09, 10:42 AM   #39
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

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Originally Posted by Rockmjd23 View Post
What about Dr. No?
http://www.cinemaretro.com/index.php...AT-AGE-91.html

Quote:
Joseph Wiseman, who made screen history as the first 007 screen villain in the title role of Dr. No, has died at age 91. Wiseman was a distinguished name in both film and on stage, and remained active on Broadway in recent years. Only a few years ago, he had a major role in the revival of Judgment at Nuremberg. Wiseman also had many other major films to his credit including The Night They Raided Minsky's, Detective Story and The Unforgiven. Wiseman rarely granted interviews, despite countless requests to discuss his role in Dr. No. On a personal note, back in the 1990s, I attended a New York film event at which Sean Connery was honored. To everyone's surprise, Joseph Wiseman was among the speakers and he reflected fondly on Dr. No. When a film clip was shown of Connery and Wiseman in the film, the audience went wild. He was a major talent and will be sorely missed
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Old 10-23-09, 12:11 AM   #40
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://enews.earthlink.net/article/t...91022535545292

Quote:
Pie-splattered comedian Soupy Sales dies at 83

DETROIT - Soupy Sales, the rubber-faced comedian whose anything-for-a-chuckle career was built on 20,000 pies to the face and 5,000 live TV appearances across a half-century of laughs, has died. He was 83.

Sales died at Thursday night at Calvary Hospice in the Bronx, New York, said his former manager and longtime friend, Dave Usher. Sales had many health problems and entered the hospice last week, Usher said.

At the peak of his fame in the 1950s and '60s, Sales was one of the best-known faces in the nation, Usher said.

"If President Eisenhower would have walked down the street, no one would have recognized him as much as Soupy," said Usher.

At the same time, Sales retained an openness to fans that turned every restaurant meal into an endless autograph-signing session, Usher said.

"He was just good to people," Usher said.

Sales began his TV career in the Ohio cities of Cincinnati and Cleveland, then moved to Detroit, Michigan, where he drew a large audience on WXYZ-TV. He moved to Los Angeles in 1961.

The comic's pie-throwing schtick became his trademark, and celebrities lined up to take one on the chin alongside Sales. During the early 1960s, stars such as Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis and Shirley MacLaine received their just desserts side-by-side with the comedian on his television show.

"I'll probably be remembered for the pies, and that's all right," Sales said in a 1985 interview.

Sales was born Milton Supman on Jan. 8, 1926, in North Carolina and grew up in Huntington, West Virginia.

His greatest success came in New York with "The Soupy Sales Show" - an ostensible children's show that had little to do with the usual kiddie fare. Sales' manic, improvisational style also attracted an older audience that responded to his envelope-pushing antics.

Sales, who was typically clad in a black sweater and oversized bow-tie, was once suspended for a week after telling his legion of tiny listeners to empty their mothers' purse and mail him all the pieces of green paper bearing pictures of the presidents.

The cast of "Saturday Night Live" later paid homage by asking their audience to send in their joints. His influence was also obvious in the Pee-Wee Herman character created by Paul Reubens.

Sales is survived by his wife, Trudy, and two sons, Hunt and Tony, a pair of musicians who backed David Bowie in the band Tin Machine.
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Old 10-23-09, 05:58 AM   #41
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I would have guessed that Sales was older than 83.
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Old 10-26-09, 01:18 PM   #42
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Lou Jacobi

NEW YORK (AP) — Actor Lou Jacobi, who was known for comic roles and won praise in dramatic ones over a long career in the theater and movies, has died. He was 95.

The Canadian-born actor died Friday at his home in Manhattan. The death was confirmed by Leonie Nowitz, a social worker who had been overseeing his care.

Jacobi made his Broadway debut in 1955 in "The Diary of Anne Frank," playing one of the occupants of the Amsterdam attic where the Franks were hiding. He played the same role in the 1959 film version.

He was in nine other Broadway plays, including Paddy Chayefsky's "Tenth Man" in 1959 and Neil Simon's "Come Blow Your Horn" in 1961.

Jacobi was in some two dozen other movies, including the Dudley Moore comedy "Arthur," Woody Allen's "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex" and Barry Levinson's "Avalon."

His last movie was "I.Q." in 1994. He played the logician Kurt Godel, one of Albert Einstein's professor friends at Princeton.

He also appeared in many TV shows, including "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." and "That Girl." He was a regular on "The Dean Martin Show" on NBC for two seasons in the early 1970s.

Jacobi was born Louis Harold Jacobovitch in 1913 in Toronto and began acting as a boy.



---

Shiloh Pepin

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Shiloh Pepin, a girl who was born with fused legs, a rare condition often called "mermaid syndrome," and gained a wide following on the Internet and national television, has died. She was 10.

Doctors had predicted she would only survive only for days after her birth at the most, but the girl, described by her mother as "a tough little thing," died at Maine Medical Center on Friday afternoon, hospital spokesman John Lamb said. She had been hospitalized in critical condition for nearly a week.

Being born with "mermaid syndrome," also known as sirenomelia, meant that the Kennebunkport girl had only one partially working kidney, no lower colon or genital organs and legs fused from the waist down.

Some children who have survived sirenomelia have had surgery to separate their legs, but Shiloh did not because blood vessels crossing from side to side in her circulatory system would have been severed. She had received two kidney transplants, the last one in 2007.

Her story was featured recently on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" and other national television programs.

Shiloh was a fifth-grader at Kennebunkport Consolidated School. Counselors will be available next week to talk to students.
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Old 10-26-09, 03:58 PM   #43
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I do believe that Jacobi pic is a cap from Amazon Women on the Moon.
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Old 10-26-09, 04:05 PM   #44
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfoobar View Post
I do believe that Jacobi pic is a cap from Amazon Women on the Moon.
I thought he looked familiar!

Where am I?
On the Disney Channel. At least there I know you won't catch anything.
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Old 10-28-09, 12:30 PM   #45
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Troy N. Smith

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Troy N. Smith, the founder of a drive-in chain that became Sonic restaurants, has died in Oklahoma City. He was 87.

A spokeswoman for the Oklahoma City-based restaurant chain says Smith died Monday at an Oklahoma City hospital after a recent decline in health.

Smith started the Top Hat root beer stand in Shawnee, Okla., in 1953 and later converted it into a drive-in restaurant where customers used an intercom speaker system to place orders from their cars.

He eventually changed the name to Sonic Drive-Ins. There currently are nearly 3,600 restaurants in 42 states.
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Old 11-12-09, 05:25 PM   #46
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Carl Ballantine

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Carl Ballantine, a comedian, magician and actor who was in the 1960s TV sitcom "McHale's Navy," has died. He was 92.

His daughter says he died Nov. 3 in his sleep at his home in the Hollywood Hills.

Ballantine, who was born Meyer Kessler in Chicago, switched from straight magic to comedy in the 1940s. He would fumble tricks while joking with the audience. He appeared in Las Vegas, in nightclubs and on TV variety shows, including "The Tonight Show."

Steve Martin says Ballantine influenced him and a generation of magicians and comedians.

Ballantine was crewman Lester Gruber in "McHale's Navy" and had roles in several other TV shows and movies.

He also did voiceovers in many cartoons and commercials.
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Old 11-13-09, 12:48 AM   #47
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

David Lloyd

David Lloyd, who wrote scores of scripts for some of the most popular television sitcoms of the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s — including the memorable Chuckles the Clown episode of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” which was revered by comedy connoisseurs for wringing belly laughs from a funeral — died Tuesday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 75.

The cause was prostate cancer, which was diagnosed 21 years ago, his son Christopher said.

Mr. Lloyd was an astonishingly productive writer by series television standards, not only generating scripts on his own but also working with other writers to doctor scripts in trouble. In addition to “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” for which he had credits on more than 30 episodes between 1973 and 1977, Mr. Lloyd wrote for, among other shows, “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Lou Grant,” “Rhoda,” “Phyllis,” “The Tony Randall Show,” “The Associates,” “Taxi,” “Dear John,” “Amen,” “Wings,” “Cheers” and “Frasier.”

(Source: New York Times)

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Old 12-23-09, 05:18 AM   #48
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Ann Nixon Cooper

ATLANTA — Ann Nixon Cooper, the Atlanta centenarian lauded by President Obama in his election night speech last year, has died. She was 107.

Obama in his 2008 speech called Ms. Cooper an example of "the heartbreak and the hope" of the past century. He noted she was born at a time when women and blacks couldn’t vote and lived to cast her ballot for the country’s first black president.

...

On Inauguration Day, she proudly hosted a full house of media and guests to watch Obama take office — a feat for which she took partial credit. When one of her grandsons asked, "How do you feel about having a black president?" she quickly responded, "I helped put him there."

Ms. Cooper first registered to vote on Sept. 1, 1941, but because she was a black woman in a segregated, sexist society, she didn’t exercise her right for years — deferring instead to her husband, Dr. Albert B. Cooper, a prominent Atlanta dentist.

Ann Nixon Cooper outlived her husband, who died in 1967, and three of her four children. She cast an early ballot for Obama on Oct. 16, 2008.

Ms. Cooper was an active woman who did aerobics until she was 100, took the stairs to her bedroom until she broke her hip last year and wore out friends 20 years her junior on shopping trips.
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Old 04-13-10, 01:58 PM   #49
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

A few lately that are notable..

Dixie Carter

Dixie Carter, who gained television fame as Julia Sugarbaker on the long-running CBS sitcom "Designing Women," has died. She was 70.

Carter died Saturday morning at a Houston hospital of complications from cancer, said Steve Rohr, publicist for Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook. "This has been a terrible blow to our family," Holbrook said in a written statement. "We would appreciate everyone understanding that this is a private family tragedy."

Meinhardt Raabe

As coroner, I must aver

I thoroughly examined her.

And she’s not only merely dead,

She’s really most sincerely dead.

When Meinhardt Raabe, an unknown 23-year-old from Wisconsin, sang those lines in his first and only Hollywood feature film, he little suspected that they would shape the course of his life for the next seven decades.

The lines, of course, belong to the Munchkin coroner in the classic 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz.” Raabe’s brief appearance in the film — about 13 seconds of uncredited screen time — made him an internationally recognized pop-cultural figure, if not precisely a household name.

Raabe, who was also a wartime aviator and the first Little Oscar, the mascot of the Oscar Mayer meat company, died Friday in Orange Park, Fla., at 94. Bob Rigel, president of the Penney Retirement Community in Penney Farms, Fla., where Raabe had lived since 1986, said that the cause had not been officially determined but that it was presumed to be a heart attack.

At his death, Raabe was one of a handful of surviving Munchkins from the film.
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Old 04-16-10, 02:20 PM   #50
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Daryl Gates

Daryl Gates, the blunt former Los Angeles police chief best known for his handling of the Rodney King beating and 1992 race riots, died on Friday. He was 83.

---

I always thought he did a good job as police chief.
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