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Old 12-27-16, 11:39 AM   -   Wikipost
DVD Talk Forum Thread Wiki: Zod's feelgood obituary thread
Please read: This is a community-maintained wiki post containing the most important information from this thread. You may edit the Wiki once you have been a member for 90 days and have made 90 posts.
 
Last edit by: General Zod
This is a place to post death notices/obituaries for lesser-known individuals who probably wouldn't be worthy of an individual thread.

The "feel good" aspect is giving honor to these folks who might fly under the radar, so to speak.

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Old 01-13-17, 05:20 PM   #351
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

William Peter Blatty, author of 'The Exorcist,' dies at 89

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/13/entert...r-blatty-dies/
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Old 01-16-17, 07:25 PM   #352
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Jimmy 'Superfly' Snuka

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/15/us/jim...ly-snuka-obit/

Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka, the wrestler known for his high-flying leap off the ring's top rope that flattened his opponents, died on Sunday. He was 73.
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Old 01-16-17, 07:37 PM   #353
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

And murder. Don't forget the murder.
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Old 01-18-17, 11:30 AM   #354
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Eugene Cernan: Last Man on the Moon
By Elizabeth Howell, Space.com Contributor | January 16, 2017 04:17pm ET

Eugene Cernan was the last man to walk on the moon. He visited the moon's neighborhood twice, aboard Apollo 10 and Apollo 17, and also did a challenging spacewalk aboard Gemini 9.

While he chose not to fly in the shuttle program, Cernan remained involved in space as a motivational speaker and sometime television commentator who worked on ABC broadcasts about the space shuttle. He died on January 16, 2017.
http://www.space.com/20790-eugene-ce...biography.html

Only 12 humans have walked on the Moon. Only six are still alive. The youngest of them is 81.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ed_on_the_Moon
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Old 01-19-17, 07:02 PM   #355
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Miguel Ferrer



http://deadline.com/2017/01/miguel-f...an-1201890002/
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Old 01-19-17, 08:58 PM   #356
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Well, damn. Didn't know he was George Clooney's cousin. Enjoyed his performances, RIP Miguel.
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Old 04-16-17, 12:29 PM   #357
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Surprised to learn about this, and that there wasn't a thread in Movie Talk.

Quote:
'Goodfellas' Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus Dies at 81

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...-was-81-993253
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Old 05-03-17, 03:59 PM   #358
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

http://www.thv11.com/news/local/conv...-old/436485626
good riddance, it doesn't get much lower than sex trafficking little girls
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Old 05-09-17, 09:38 PM   #359
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Rob And Big Star Christopher 'Big Black' Boykin Dead At 45

Christopher "Big Black" Boykin, who memorably starred on the MTV series Rob and Big, has died. He was 45.

"MTV is deeply saddened to learn the news of Christopher 'Big Black' Boykin's passing," the network said in a statement. "He was a long time and beloved member of the MTV family and will be greatly missed. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends at this time."

The MTV star's representative confirmed to People that Big passed away on Tuesday morning; the cause of death was a heart attack. He is survived by a nine-year-old daughter Isis Rae Boykin. TMZ was first to report the news.

The MTV audience first met Big when he starred opposite his best friend Rob Dyrdek on Rob and Big. The program aired from 2006 to 2008 and followed the buds as they became video game characters, placed bets on turtle races and attempted to break every earthly skateboarding record.

Big subsequently appeared on Fantasy Factory, Ridiculousness and Guy Code.

http://www.mtv.com/news/3011464/chri...kin-died-dead/
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Old 05-10-17, 09:57 AM   #360
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacon View Post
http://www.thv11.com/news/local/conv...-old/436485626
good riddance, it doesn't get much lower than sex trafficking little girls
http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news...ur-way/672958/

This is the first time I've ever seen "He will not be missed" as the last line of a newspaper obituary.
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Old 05-10-17, 10:32 AM   #361
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Danger View Post
http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news...ur-way/672958/

This is the first time I've ever seen "He will not be missed" as the last line of a newspaper obituary.
Fouke, AR is where 'The Legend of Boggy Creek' was filmed. All of which is to say, the townsfolk were already conversant with monsters, not to mention fleecing.
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Old 05-10-17, 05:48 PM   #362
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Robert Miles, trance producer and DJ, dies aged 47
https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...music-children

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Best known for his No 1 hit Children, the artist has died in Ibiza, Spain, after a short illness.

Robert Miles, trance producer and DJ best known for his No 1 hit Children, has died aged 47.

News of the Swiss-born Italian artist’s death was first reported by DJ Mag Italia, who claim he died of an “unspecified illness” but this has yet to be confirmed. Producer and longtime friend Joe T Vannelli verified the reports to the Press Association, saying: “Yes man, (it) is a tragedy.”

He later posted a tribute to the producer on his Facebook: “The tragic news of the death of a very talented artist of our time, makes me incredulous and upset,” Vannelli said. “I will miss the fights, brawls, criticism, judgements but especially your talent in finding sounds and melodies unparalleled.”

Miles - real name Roberto Concina - released his debut, Dreamland, in June 1996, an album which went platinum in Europe. It featured the hypnotic trance track Children, which cost just Ł150 to produce, and went to No 1 in more than 12 countries. In the wake of this success, he retreated from the glare, releasing a string of albums that included 1997’s 23am, 2001’s Organik and Miles_Gurtu in 2004. He was also known for launching Open Lab, a Balearic radio station which broadcast from Ibiza and covered arts, media and technology.

Many established names in the world of electronic music have since celebrated the late artist’s career, with DJ Pete Tong, an early champion of Children, thanking Miles “for the music” and Darude thanking him for “the inspiration, direction and courage.”
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Old 05-12-17, 08:58 AM   #363
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

Quote:
Stan Weston, 84, Dies; Sent G.I. Joe Marching Into Childhoods of Millions
By RICHARD SANDOMIR
MAY 11, 2017



Stan Weston, whose concept for a military action figure became the heroic G.I. Joe, one of the most popular toys ever produced, died on May 1 at his home in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 84.

His daughter, Cindy Winebaum, said the cause was complications from surgery.

In 1963, Mr. Weston was a successful licensing agent who represented properties and personalities like the television drama “Dr. Kildare,” the comedian Soupy Sales and the Kingston Trio folk music group. When he approached the Hasbro toy company, he believed he might be able to replicate the success of the Barbie doll, the plastic fashionista that was introduced by Mattel in 1959 and was followed two years later by her boyfriend, Ken.

From Elliott Handler, a founder of Mattel, he had learned that a popular product could spawn a big, continuous business, like Barbie’s outfits and accessories.

“Stan, you’ve got to sell them the razor,” Mr. Weston said, recalling Mr. Handler’s advice in the book “Mego 8-Inch Super Heroes: World’s Greatest Toys!” (2007) by Benjamin Holcomb. “Then you can sell them a lot of blades.”

After trolling the Encyclopaedia Britannica for a subject that might yield Barbie-esque success, he alighted on the men of the United States military, who wore many uniforms, wielded numerous weapons and drove various vehicles (read: accessories).


For his pitch to Hasbro, he mounted paraphernalia from military branches and flags on yellow cardboard, according to a 2012 article by his brother, Jay, in The Huffington Post. At a second meeting, Mr. Weston brought mock-up figures of a soldier, a Marine, a pilot and a sailor using small, flexible wooden models that he had purchased in an art supply store

“You will make a fortune with these,” Donald Levine, a Hasbro executive, told Mr. Weston, according to the article.

In a letter to Mr. Levine that confirmed his ideas, Mr. Weston said that a “complete military package” could be developed around “rugged-looking scale dolls for boys complete with military wardrobes to scale, military headgear to scale, military weapons to scale,” and armed service insignia, combat medals, sharpshooting awards and flags of the United States and the world.

As payment, Hasbro offered him $75,000 or a tiny royalty fee that was below the industry norm because he was new to the toy business, his daughter said. Eventually, he asked for $100,000, and Hasbro agreed.

“When he saw the line at the 1964 Toy Fair,” she said, “he knew he had made a mistake.”


Mr. Levine, a Korean War veteran, told NPR that he named the doll after watching the 1945 film “The Story of G.I. Joe,” and that it was his way to honor the armed forces. Manufacturing of the G.I. Joe figures, 12 inches tall, began in 1964, before American involvement in Vietnam had swelled and public faith in the government and the military had begun eroding.

Hasbro advertised G.I. Joe in a commercial with a martial-sounding song with the lyrics, “G.I. Joe, G.I. Joe, fighting man from head to toe, on the land, on the sea, in the air.”

Vincent Santelmo, who has written several books about G.I. Joe, recalled seeing displays of the action figure in a toy store in the Bronx when he was growing up. “My mother wasn’t fond of the war-toy thing, but she let me have them, and after that, my relatives purchased anything that had to do with Joe for me as gifts,” he said in a telephone interview. “Once in a while, an unsuspecting aunt would slip in a Ken. I could just tell by the style of the book that he wasn’t a G.I. Joe, and I put him to the side someplace.”

G.I. Joe was a breakthrough: a boy’s doll, only in battle dress, with a footlocker full of accessories that kept young fans hungry for more. More than 400 million G.I. Joe action figures had been sold in the United States by 2009, according to Toys and American Culture: An Encyclopedia (2010). And hundreds of G.I. Joe characters have been produced by Hasbro.

“It defined the beginning of the action figure category,” said Steve Pasierb, president and chief executive of the Toy Association, the trade group for manufacturers.



But the good times did not last forever. In the late 1970s, Hasbro shelved G.I. Joe, but it revived him as a three-and-three-quarter-inch figure several years later.

Stan Weston was born Stanley Alan Weinstein on April 1, 1933, in Brooklyn. His father, Philip, worked in the garment industry; his mother, the former Shirley Bisnoff, was a homemaker and a jazz pianist.

As a child, Stan not only loved and read comic books but also sold some of his from a milk crate for 3 cents each. He attended New York University before serving in the Army; after his discharge, he earned his bachelor’s degree and M.B.A. there. He changed his surname to protect against anti-Semitism in the business world.

Mr. Weston worked at the advertising agency McCann Erickson in Manhattan before starting his own licensing firm there.

After creating G.I. Joe, Mr. Weston balanced licensing work with other ventures. In 1966, he created Captain Action for the Ideal Toy Company. The accessorial twist to Caption Action was that his blue and black superhero uniform could be replaced with the costumes of better-known superheroes like Superman, Batman, the Lone Ranger, the Green Hornet and Spider-Man. Ideal discontinued it after a few years as “the superhero craze began to lose steam,” according to the Captain Action website.

Mr. Weston was also a major part of a group that developed the 1980s cartoon series “Thundercats,” about a team of humanoid cat people, and licensed its products worldwide.

But there was unfinished business between Mr. Weston and Hasbro over G.I. Joe. In 2015, Mr. Weston filed suit in federal court to terminate Hasbro’s copyright to the toy in 2020, when it was scheduled to lapse, using a provision of copyright legislation that went into effect in 1978. The value of the copyright interests that he transferred to Hasbro “exceeds $100 million,” the suit said.

In the suit, Mr. Weston described overseeing Hasbro’s fabrication of the “outfitted action figures” that became G.I. Joe, and contended that each side in the dispute viewed him as its “creator and author.”

His daughter, Cindy, said: “He never felt he got what he should have, and once there was an opportunity to revisit the issue through the copyright law, he took it. He regretted the deal he originally chose, but he didn’t live his life in regret.”

His lawyer, Bert Fields, said that the case was settled last year and that the terms were confidential.

In addition to his daughter, his son Steve and his brother, Mr. Weston is survived by another son, Brad, and five grandchildren. His two marriages ended in divorce.

G.I. Joe found another life as the basis a live-action film in 2009. In “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra,” starring Channing Tatum and Dennis Quaid, the action figure’s name was used not for a single human soldier but for an elite military unit.

The movie’s production was overseen by Mr. Weston’s son Brad, who was then president of production at Paramount. The film — which grossed more than $300 million worldwide — does not appear to have been a project suggested by Mr. Weston to his son.

“Paramount had already done a couple of ‘Transformers’ movies,” Steve Weston said, “and ‘G.I. Joe’ was a natural extension to the Hasbro portfolio.”

A sequel, “G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” starring Mr. Tatum and Dwayne Johnson, was released in 2013 and sold $375 million in tickets worldwide.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/b...e-creator.html

I didn't know he was involved with Thundercats. From a yard sale I had a fuzzy beard G.I. Joe with training tower but most of my action figures were the early '80s 3 3/4" G.I. Joes and vehicles.

Taps for Mr. Weston.
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Old 05-12-17, 09:23 AM   #364
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

I had a G.I. Joe back in the 60s. Other than Legos, it was my main entertainment. I even had a jeep for him.
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Old 05-13-17, 05:44 AM   #365
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Re: Zod's feelgood obituary thread

My G.I Joe had a beard, a scar on his face and Kung fu grip.
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