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Old 02-09-06, 06:41 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Bus
Yes but Le Creuset is bakeware. How do you make eggs? Stir-fry?
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Old 02-09-06, 07:01 PM   #27
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In winter, it gets too cold and windy on my 3rd floor Montreal balcony for me to use my crappy BBQ. I've tried and tried, but the light always goes out. Can't wait for spring.
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Old 02-09-06, 07:29 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by The Bus
Why no one sells pre-seasoned iron cookware is beyond me.
Lodge has been selling it for a while now.

And I agree, cast iron rocks. Get a skillet, at least.
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Old 02-09-06, 10:59 PM   #29
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Even though it's pre-seasoned, you pretty well have to season it again anyhow, as by the time you get it, the pre-seasoned oil is very deep within the iron.
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Old 02-09-06, 11:22 PM   #30
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Seasoning is an ongoing process, but the pre-seasoned ones give you a head start. I have two cast iron skillets - one pre-seasoned and one I seasoned myself. I could cook on the pre-seasoned one right away.

(BTW, it's not that I find the seasoning process particulary onerous. It's just that the size I wanted happened to come that way.)
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Old 02-10-06, 01:31 PM   #31
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Well, here's my list, then:

2 and 4 quart saucepans
12" and 15" skillets (frying pans)
8", 10", and 12" nonstick skillets
12" square griddle
Cast-iron dutch oven

Is anything obviously missing? Does anyone have any thoughts about sloped-sided or sheer-sided skillets?
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Old 02-10-06, 01:37 PM   #32
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I would also include a roasting pan. The Dutch oven will do for most purposes, but at Thanksgiving and Christmas, it's nice to have a large oval or rectangular metal roasting pan. They come in handy.
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Old 02-10-06, 01:45 PM   #33
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I have a ceramic roasting pan that I love to use. The great thing is that it's non-stick and poultry skin on the bottom of the pan turns out the same as the top and sides.
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Old 12-13-09, 02:04 PM   #34
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Help me with a couple of non-stick pans....please!

I'm a competent cook. I have been using the same cookware (original Magpan (sp?)) for 20 years. It is extremely heavy and not non-stick. I LOVE it.

However, my wife has been cooking more and hates this commercial stuff. She doesn't understand how to cook on it and gets pissed because of clean up (because she doesn't know how to cook on it). I have a couple of non-stick Calphalon pans for eggs (and a fritatta set).

I'm looking for a couple of non-stick pans for her. Either a mid-priced set or open stock. Specifically I notice she uses a 12" skillet and one of my 8-quart pots a lot.

So suggests for a set, or I'm totally confused on the different non-stick Calphalon (and thus would match my egg pans). I "think" my egg pans are the Calphalon One or Simply.

Suggestions???
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Old 12-14-09, 05:31 PM   #35
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

For non-stick/Teflon pans, DON'T FORGET: NEVER use a metal spatula--use wooden spoons and plastic flippers instead. And NEVER scrub with steel wool--use a plastic scrubber with not too much force.
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Old 12-15-09, 08:55 PM   #36
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Didn't really need a whole set, but this is seems like such a smoking deal, I think I'll get...maybe...LO>

https://www.potsandpans.com/webapp/w...10001_62608_-1
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Old 12-16-09, 09:13 AM   #37
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

I own 3 Teflon coated non stick pans. They are Kirkland brand and I could not believe how well made they were when I got them. And I HATE Teflon. We only use it to cook on low-heat and I have been saying for 5 years that once these pans are done we will not have any more Teflon in my house at all.

My pots and pans basically go like this:
All Clad MC II - 12" skillet
All Clad MC II - 2 & 4 quart sauce
All Clad MC II - 9 quart sauce
All Clad MC II - 8" skillet
All Clad MC II - 12" all purpose pan (fry pan with handle)
All Clad Pasta Pot/Steamer
Le Cruesset - 9 1/2 quart Dutch Oven
Le Cruesset - 7 1/2 quart French Oven
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Old 12-16-09, 09:38 AM   #38
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Here's what you need, IMO:

Cast iron skillet (one problem, it takes years to get a good season going, IMO)

Three good unlined stainless saucepans with thick bottoms and lips that facilitate pouring (dont worry about the brand name, just make sure they don't have plastic handles so they can go straight into the oven)

A Le Creuset dutch oven (this does not involve flatulence...). These are extremely expensive (almost $200) but worth every penny.

A cast iron flat skillet for crepes/pancakes, if you like them

An electric skillet

None of these things should cost too much, with the exception of the Le Creuset oven. Cast iron is cheap, performs better than anything, will last basically forever and can go straight into the oven. It's slightly harder to maintain (no soap, use a teaspoon of water and kosher salt to clean), but it's not a big deal. The main thing is to keep them seasoned and dry so they don't rust.

The electric skillet's the key. They heat up quickly, cook really fast, are cheap, easy to clean and never break. Lots of professional kitchens use them instead of full stovetops. We use ours all the time.

I try to stay away from non-stick, just use a little oil and let a sear develop on anything you're cooking and nothing will stick. Also, deglazing is the key to good flavor, tough to do with a non-stick...
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Old 12-16-09, 05:00 PM   #39
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Again, I have a lot of very good commercial pans. I have many (more than a full set) of very thick, very heavy commercial pans. I'm out of town, but these are Magpans (sp?) and some are 20 years old. They don't make them anymore (tho I think they sold the name). They were a direct competetor and equal to the Calphalon before they went out of business. I have various size skillets and pots all with lids. All are oven save. I also have two different sizes of Lodge Cast Iron pans and a cast iron double sided griddle. None of these are nonstick. And thus my wife doesn't like them. I have two nonstick Calphalon omelet pans (they connect to make a frittata pan).

I'm looking for a largish (4.5 or 5 qt or 12") skillet with lid and largish (maybe 8 qt) chili pot with lid both nonstick. Wife is cooking more and really prefers the nonstick. I know, I know, she doesn't know how to cook on the commercial stuff. But I want to encourage her to continue to cook. If she wants nonstick, so be it.

However, it appears it is as cheap (sometimes cheaper) to get a set. I'm looking at all options, but I really want something nonstick that is still oven safe in case I use them.
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Old 12-16-09, 06:04 PM   #40
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

I bought some pans at Walmart for 50.00 that included an extra pan and utensils (like a flipper, etc.) back in October and finally used them last weekend at my new house. Eggs stuck to the non-stick pan like cement. I guess my month or so working at Hardees in the 70's did not help any.....Well, about the same, Well done. I remember once the cashier said a lady wanted an easy over egg or something like that, she got an under cooked scrammbled egg.
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Old 01-15-10, 01:17 PM   #41
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Looking for a couple skillets...don't think I can use cast iron, since I have a glass-top stove.

I have a couple Revere Ware non-stick skillets I use now (I think 7" and 9"), and a square teflon coated griddle.

I make eggs and pancakes all the time, try making omelets, and fish, but other than that I really don't make much in skillets. But I find myself wanting to experiment more and more.

So what should I have for eggs/omelets/pancakes?

And what should I be making fish in?

My pans now have plastic handles so I can't put them in the oven - should I be sure to get something that can go right in the oven from the stove?
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Old 01-15-10, 03:49 PM   #42
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by aktick View Post
Looking for a couple skillets...don't think I can use cast iron, since I have a glass-top stove.
I was told that by several people too, COMPLETE BULLSHIT!

I have used cast iron on my electric ceramic cook top stove for years now and it seems to work out better than any other skillet I have tried. Get a lodge logic pre-seasoned, then season it many more times

Just be careful to set it down gently on the glass surface, no banging it (I think that is why people tell you not to do it, to avoid accidents, no other reason)

Quote:

I make eggs and pancakes all the time, try making omelets, and fish, but other than that I really don't make much in skillets. But I find myself wanting to experiment more and more.

So what should I have for eggs/omelets/pancakes?

I also have a couple sizes of this skillet

Cuisinart Classic Nonstick Fry Pan

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00..._ya_oh_product

and it is perfect for when you want to do a quick fried egg. However, once you get the cast iron seasoned and learn how to cook with it, you can do fried eggs without a problem (need about an additional 6 months of seasoning on the skillet at a min)


Fish = cast iron

and yes, you want to go from stove top to oven when cooking certain meats. It is nice to batter fry a thick center cut pork chop, then toss it in the oven to finish cooking.
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Old 01-15-10, 05:49 PM   #43
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4KRG View Post
I was told that by several people too, COMPLETE BULLSHIT!

I have used cast iron on my electric ceramic cook top stove for years now and it seems to work out better than any other skillet I have tried. Get a lodge logic pre-seasoned, then season it many more times

Just be careful to set it down gently on the glass surface, no banging it (I think that is why people tell you not to do it, to avoid accidents, no other reason)
Thanks a lot...and wow, they actually had Lodge Logic at Walmart. Picked up a 10.5" one.

So frying eggs shouldn't be attempted on it right away?
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Old 01-15-10, 10:13 PM   #44
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by aktick View Post

So frying eggs shouldn't be attempted on it right away?
Our lodge cast iron pieces have several years worth of seasoning on them (remember to only clean with a towel/sponge and hot water, no soap) I can cook an over easy egg on it and my wife can't some of it has to do with technique, but you need it well seasoned for eggs (or tons of oil, which I usually don't do, I just like a thin layer of oil)
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Old 01-15-10, 10:34 PM   #45
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

LeCreuset ovens and skillets can be found at a considerable discount at estate sales. I've scored some there, kept a 20 cm Tiffany-blue pot, sold the ones I didn't like on eBay, then bid on what I did like. I also found a small Griswold cast iron skillet, seasoned from use, and brought it home, cleaned it up with steel wool and we use it to fry an egg for a quick breakfast.

Someone mentioned stoneware for baking, I want to give that a big thumbs up. It should be safer to use than teflon coated metal bakeware and it seasons up really well.

As far as stainless steel goes, I found myself grousing about heaving my heavy LeCreuset pots around and washing them up for something as simple as boiling ravioli. I didn't want to drop a crapton on All-Clad so I cruised on over to IKEA where they have a great small set for $9.99. I've been so pleased with that purchase. It's the best 10 bucks I've spent there in awhile! It's going on my essential housewarming present list from here on out.
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Old 05-06-12, 05:29 PM   #46
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Bought my first stainless steel pan. Got a 10" sauté pan for searing, making pan sauces, etc. thought I'd give it a try.

Suggestions? I see it is recommended to use lower heat than normal (or that you would a typical pan).

It sounds like similar use to what I use my cast iron pan for. But dang some just love them some SS. So found a decent deal and grabbed,

http://www1.macys.com/shop/product/e...xx.esn_results

Any favorite recipes to use with it?

(sorry for the old bump, just didn't think worth a new thread)
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Old 05-07-12, 06:10 PM   #47
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by FunkDaddy J View Post
Well, here's my list, then:

2 and 4 quart saucepans
12" and 15" skillets (frying pans)
8", 10", and 12" nonstick skillets
12" square griddle
Cast-iron dutch oven

Is anything obviously missing? Does anyone have any thoughts about sloped-sided or sheer-sided skillets?
Do you have covers for the skillets and pans? Plenty of cooking recipes call for covering the pan/skillet and allowing it to simmer to finish cooking.

I also use Calphalon and I like them. If you use a cooking spray such as PAM, your food won't stick to the pans. It's healthier than spreading oil or butter on the bottom of your pans. And easier too! Cooking sprays are the way to go IMO.
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Old 05-07-12, 11:59 PM   #48
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sdallnct View Post
Suggestions? I see it is recommended to use lower heat than normal (or that you would a typical pan).
I have All-Clad, which is similar to the Emeril pans. When you first put meat into a traditional (in other words, not nonstick) pan, you might be tempted to try to move the food around. You need to leave it alone for a couple of minutes so a crust can form. It'll seem like it's sticking, but it will release on its own once the crust forms.

One big advantage of traditional pans is that you get browned bits of food stuck to the bottom, what in French cooking is called the fond. Most recipes call for adding more liquid later (water, stock, wine or even the moisture from vegetables like onions or carrots) that will help the fond dissolve into the food, adding flavor.

You'll learn through trial and error how hot the pan needs to be, but in general add your oil and let it heat up until it's shimmering, then add the food.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshic View Post
If you use a cooking spray such as PAM, your food won't stick to the pans. It's healthier than spreading oil or butter on the bottom of your pans. And easier too! Cooking sprays are the way to go IMO.
I'm going to disagree. PAM is nothing more than aerosolized vegetable oil, the only difference being that it tends to be inferior quality oil. It's no more or less healthy than any other oil. All you have to do is be aware of how much oil you need to add to the pan to accomplish whatever you're trying to do and no more.

PAM is useful for spraying things like cake pans where it can be hard to wipe oil into every nook and cranny, but for general cooking you're better off using liquid oil, which will be cheaper, too.

Olive oil is the go-to oil these days, but it has a low smoke point. That means it's good for most uses other than high-temperature frying.

You don't need to use extra-virgin olive oil for sauteing and so forth because heating it negates the flavor advantages of using more expensive oil. Just use a decent quality olive oil for sauteing and save the pricier stuff for other uses.
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Old 05-08-12, 08:06 AM   #49
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Salty View Post
I have All-Clad, which is similar to the Emeril pans. When you first put meat into a traditional (in other words, not nonstick) pan, you might be tempted to try to move the food around. You need to leave it alone for a couple of minutes so a crust can form. It'll seem like it's sticking, but it will release on its own once the crust forms.

One big advantage of traditional pans is that you get browned bits of food stuck to the bottom, what in French cooking is called the fond. Most recipes call for adding more liquid later (water, stock, wine or even the moisture from vegetables like onions or carrots) that will help the fond dissolve into the food, adding flavor.

You'll learn through trial and error how hot the pan needs to be, but in general add your oil and let it heat up until it's shimmering, then add the food.



I'm going to disagree. PAM is nothing more than aerosolized vegetable oil, the only difference being that it tends to be inferior quality oil. It's no more or less healthy than any other oil. All you have to do is be aware of how much oil you need to add to the pan to accomplish whatever you're trying to do and no more.

PAM is useful for spraying things like cake pans where it can be hard to wipe oil into every nook and cranny, but for general cooking you're better off using liquid oil, which will be cheaper, too.

Olive oil is the go-to oil these days, but it has a low smoke point. That means it's good for most uses other than high-temperature frying.

You don't need to use extra-virgin olive oil for sauteing and so forth because heating it negates the flavor advantages of using more expensive oil. Just use a decent quality olive oil for sauteing and save the pricier stuff for other uses.
Ok, I'm use to using sticky (not non-stick pans). Including my beloved 12" cast iron pan.

I just wondered if something unique to SS.

Oh and agree with your oil statement. Tho I tend to mix a touch of unsalted butter with the oil. I think it adds better color when searing. And while butter has a low smoking point mixed with a little oil will raise that. Or I have tried making clarified butter and using that. But not entirely sure worth the effort unless you want to use it alone (clarified has a higher smoking point).

As for oil's for higher heat, I've been using peanut. Not only higher smoking point than extra virgin, but in lighter food, gives a touch of nutty flavor that is typically nice.
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Old 05-08-12, 08:27 AM   #50
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Re: Essential Pots & Pans

My favorite use for stainless is a basic one...making eggs.

Just a tiny bit of butter or spray oil on it on medium-medium high heat, drop some eggs down and give them a few moments to cook on the bottom, then add some water and cover (maybe a quarter cup, just enough that it's coming up around the edges of the eggs a little). This gives me perfect eggs every time (never a blemish on the white, which I hate), and you can basically do them sunny side up, over easy, or hard and do a bunch at one time without fiddling around with the flipping. Also, you have a pretty clean pan when you are done.
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